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Hass Avocado farmers reap big in Muranga

This year hass avocado farmers have shared Sh20 million as their annual bonus following direct contact with a processor. Through negotiations by the Muranga county government and multi-national Kakuzi Ltd, 3,000 farmers drawn from 60 co-operative societies delivered their quality fruits for processing.

In the past three years, avocado farmers have been benefiting with annual bonus from the processors depending on production, quality and size of the fruits. In 2014, the farmers, after they complained of exploitation by middlemen, made Governor Mwangi wa Iria to scout for a market before settling on Kakuzi and other players.

On Friday, 8th December Governor Wa-Iria witnessed the Kakuzi assistant general manager Paul Mbugua declaring the annual bonus to thousands of farmers drawn from four counties in the region. Quality fruits in the negotiated contract, the company buys a four-kilo carton of quality fruits at Sh420.  According to Mr. Mbugua, this year, production of avocado remained low due to prolonged drought that led to better payment in the international market. Payment is made to farmers a week after delivery at the factory in Makuyu. Farmers should employ strategies to increase production to supply the growing market locally and internationally.

Read Also: The benefits of certified fruit seedlings

Viability

Avocado fruit business is growing rapidly in Kenya with small-scale farmers reaping profits from this investment. It is viable with benefit-cost ratio>1 and affordable initial capital requirements. Demand projections for the consumption of Kenyan grown Hass avocado fruits locally and internationally is increasing due to its inherent characteristics and adherence to Organic production.

This agri-enterprise is ideal for Kenyan farmers and buyers finds them at their growing regions. The cost of production is low as it requires less labor, it is a perennial crop, resistant to diseases and pest which gives Kenyan farmers comparative advantage and well placed for organically grown Hass avocado.

The governor lauded the achievement following partnership between his administration and Kakuzi that has benefited the small-scale farmers who had been exploited by middlemen. Before 2013, our farmers were greatly exploited by brokers who bought an avocado at one shilling but presently they are reaping better payment.  Wa-Iria said that his administration will not entertain brokers who had been a threat.

As an agricultural organization, we work to enhance diverse seed access to our farming communities. For more information Contact our offices.

 

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Pruning, Hedging and Topping Mature Hass Avocado Trees

The need and desirability to prune or control the growth of mature avocado trees has been a matter of debate for many years. We have found that pruning does not increase fruit yield in Kenya. Continual and severe pruning generally stimulates vegetative growth at the expense of fruiting, so pruning should be done only when absolutely necessary. There are, however, situations in all avocado-growing areas where tree control by pruning is necessary and desirable.

Reasons for Pruning

  • To reduce harvest costs. Increasing harvest costs are becoming a major factor in avocado production. Fruit produced in the tops of tall, upright trees are more difficult and costlier to harvest. It is questionable in some cases if the cost of harvest is compensated by the return. Reducing and maintaining the height of the tree at an economical level is a practice followed by many even though the total crop may be reduced.
  • To prevent wind damage. Major damage and breakage may be prevented in areas of extreme winds by lowering the height of fall-growing cultivars.
  • To allow more effective pest control. More efficient and effective spray coverage may be achieved where there is less congestion between rows and when tree heights are not excessive, so pruning may be justified in areas which require chemical pest control.
  • To permit effective irrigation. Some pruning may be necessary in orchards that are sprinkler-irrigated to assure a uniform water-distribution pattern. Low-hanging branches may interfere with the pattern of low-head sprinklers. These branches should be selectively removed. Similarly, overhead sprinklers may be obstructed by tall trees and tree height control must be practiced allowing uniform coverage.
  • To permit cultivation and mowing. Low-hanging branches may interfere with cultivation or mowing where these practices are used. It is best to selectively prune the low branches rather than risk breaking them off accidentally with cultivation or mowing equipment.
  • To delay crowding. The need to thin an orchard may be delayed for a year or 2 by selective removal of branches on temporary trees which will later be removed. This provides more illumination to permanent trees and prevents loss of lower foliage and production. Such pruning does reduce the yield of the temporary trees, but reduced production for a year or 2 is preferred to no production at all on the temporary trees.

Methods of Pruning

Selective pruning

Selective pruning is accomplished by hand tools or power-assist hand tools in which the cuts made are individual and selective. This is preferred in most cases and is the only type of pruning adaptable to the terrain on which some avocado orchards are planted. Selective pruning, as the name implies, allows the individual selection of branches which are to be removed. It may be upright shoots or branches to limit or reduce the height of the tree,

overhanging side branches to reduce crowding, low-hanging branches which interfere with irrigation or other

cultural operations etc.

Prune sparingly and make cuts as close to a lateral branch as possible when such pruning is necessary. The greatest growth stimulation is nearest the cut. Removal of large branches will stimulate vegetative growth over the entire tree.

Read Also: how to grow peaches and nectrines

Mechanical hedging and topping

Hedging and topping are non-selective types of pruning which are being used today by economic necessity. Relatively little topping and even less hedging has been practiced in Muranga. However, the use of hedgers and toppers in southern Florida for avocado tree control has increased in recent years and has become an accepted cultural practice.

Hedging and topping are done by large machines which are non-selective in their cutting but which remove growth at a lower cost. The lower cost of this type of pruning may well compensate the temporary loss of production that results and the repeated tree control necessary with the following regrowth. It should be noted that the vigor and productivity of avocado trees vary depending on the cultivar and climate in which they are grown. We are not sure that frequent non-selective cutting to control growth would be a sound or economical practice in climates and with cultivars such as we have in Muranga. More information is needed concerning these practices in other areas. Chemical growth inhibitors to retard the regrowth of pruned trees or to initially train them to a more compact size has been investigated. There are currently no satisfactory materials for use, even though some have shown promise.

Time of Pruning

Light selective pruning may be done at any time of year. Heavy pruning is best done after the crop is harvested but before late summer or early fall. Late pruning may stimulate growth.

For more information, visit our offices. Book your hass avocado seedlings today.

 

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Why farmers should embrace new Hass avocado variety

Kenya produces an estimated one hundred and fifteen thousand metric tons of avocados annually. Out of this, 70%  are grown by small scale farmers. The local market has been a major beneficiary of these avocados, but lately, this has changed drastically. Many farmers have begun commercializing to the export market thanks to new variety; Hass,which has high demand in the European market.

Other varieties grown are Fuerte and Pinkerton. Initiatives by the Kenyan government have seen a major boost to the avocado industry to fully comply with global market standards and regulations. KEPHIS has been actively involved in monitoring and educating farmers and exporters. Increased investment by county governments also plays an important role in boosting farmers who have consistently struggled with low prices from middlemen.

For instance, Murang’a County one of avocado growing areas, many farmers have embraced avocado cultivation following the County government initiative of distributing free commercially viable Hass variety seedlings to farmers. They have also directed that the price of one piece of export avocado should be at least 10 Kenya shillings.

An avocado farmer reveals that they used to cultivate fuerte and pinkerston which were not high yielding. Since they embraced Hass variety they have seen an emergence of many buyers such as; Kakuzi, Vegpro, Olivado among others.

Also see: The role of an Agronomist

How to plant avocados

Most people in Muranga used to depend on coffee as their source of livelihood. Farmers attests that avocados are easy to grow unlike other fruits as they do well in different types of soil and do not require a lot of water and attention. They are fairly resistant to drought and average distributed rainfall is adequate for proper crop plant development. There are two ways of planting avocados.

  • First they are planted as seedlings which involve digging huge holes to retain water when the plants are young for a better growth. Manure is also required during their initial stages for a strong and better root development.
  • The second method is planting the ordinary avocado seeds. Top working entails cutting a whole tree and when it starts to shoot up again, we graft the emerging branches with the Hass variety to achieve a new tree which is highly productive.

Grafted hass Avocados

Grafted avocados trees take close to three to four years to be ready for fruiting and fruits can be harvested to a period of four months. On average, a single tree can yield to a maximum of 500 fruits in a season. The harvesting season for the fruit in this region is between the months of March to June.

One farmer attests that for them to have a bumper harvest, they usually have to crop manage their plant to the latter. This involves removing excess branches which reduces yields and application of ash to control mites which feeds on the base of the trees causing them to rot and eventually to dry. White flies are a major challenge they grapple with and to control them, they do regular sprays as well use traps.

On their three acre piece of land, a farmer can garner an average of two hundred and fifty thousand shillings in a season. Boniface a farmer in Muranga usually sell at forty shillings a kilogram to the established companies in the area and sometimes seven shillings per fruit to middlemen who transports the fruits to Nairobi, Thika and other major towns.

Oxfarm Organic Ltd is a licensed company that deals with seedlings. A part from growing avocados for sale, we run an avocado nursery as well. This entails planting ordinary avocado seeds in small black polythene paper bags and once they sprout and attain a height of three centimeter, we graft with the scion of the Hass variety before transplanting and selling the rest.

This process takes a period of four months for the grafted plants to be ready for planting. The demand for grafted avocados has increased by a great margin and we are are receiving orders from various people within all over the country.

We also graft and sell other seedlings. Book now for the next rainy season!!!

 

 

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Benefits of Growing Your Own Fruits

Benefits for you and your family:

  • Fresh and nutritious fruits. Fruits from your own garden are higher in nutrients than the ones that have traveled several thousand miles to get to your grocery store.
  • Having your children assist you in the garden can increase the chance that they will eat more of the fruits and vegetables they have helped to grow.
  • Growing your own fruits can offer you the opportunity to reduce the amount of pesticides that you use in your garden, making them healthier.
  • Growing your own fruits will save your money at the grocery store.
  • Gardening increases physical activity. It is a great way to engage the whole family in physical activity and lets them help to take responsibility for the garden.
  • The fruits grown in your garden will promote health because they are rich in nutrients, especially in phytochemicals, anti-oxidants, vitamin C, vitamin A and folate.
  • Gardening gives you’re a real sense of appreciation when you can see the bounty of your efforts.
  • Growing a garden gives you a new appreciation for nature, when you can have the opportunity to see how things grow.
  • Gardening may stimulate many new interests. You may want to learn more about botany, landscape architecture, photography, nutrition, and farmer’s markets.
  • Gardening gives you the opportunity to give back. If you have an abundant garden, you might give some of your produce to the local soup kitchen or food bank.
  • This can be a great time to create memories with your children, memories that can last a lifetime.
  • Your garden can lead to new skills, and knowledge for you and your family, your child may have a new found interest to become a farmer!

Society and Community

  • Gardens can foster a great sense of community through parent to parent connections, teacher to student or student to student.
  • Schools and community may decide to build a community or school garden. This is a tremendous learning tool for all involved as well a providing a source of nutritious fruits
  • A community/school garden can help to foster and motivate future leaders (e.g., 4-H afterschool programs).
  • Neighborhood Community Gardens beautify landscape, support local farmers, can create a food secure community where residents do not need to rely on vendors to supply fresh produce.

Environment

Tall fruit trees provide shade.

  • You can use less pesticides or use natural pesticides and this will be less contamination to the environment.
  • Produce peels and waste can create a lot of green waste and takes up a lot of space in the garbage can. Recycle them to make your own compost. It is less expensive than buying fertilizers.
  • Turn unsightly lands into attractive landscapes.
  • Get creative. There is a potential to grow an innovative gardens like futuristic horticulture gardens that are very cost-effective and require substantially less space.

If you’ve got a bit of empty space on your farm, growing a fruit tree is a good way to fill it and still get a passive income- beehives are a similar option, but you can surround a grown tree with beehives for kicks.

Investing in more fruit trees will make them more worthwhile, definitely- the combined benefit of many fruits is always going to be more apparently valuable for the time you spend interacting with the tree every few days. Even ignoring the quality level gain of a fruit tree and placing some kegs or preserves jars right next to your trees can boost the profits you’re seeing from your tree without much extra effort, or you could keep them around as a guarantee of some portable energy consumables during a given season.

Start exploring today!! Book seedlings today!

 

 

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How To Start A Lucrative Fruit and Vegetable Farming Business In Kenya

Kenya has a vast abundance of land, resources, and climate variations that allows it to produce different varieties of food and cash crops in its agricultural sector. This industry goes on to employ up to 70% of the Kenyan workforce, while contributing about 80% of the country’s GDP.

In the light of the economic output agriculture contributes to the economies of various African nations, the widespread demand and consumption of fruit and vegetable products in fast growing urban and rural areas has made fruit and vegetable farming in Kenya or Africa a lucrative agribusiness to venture into.

This opportunity is driving knowledgeable farmers living in Kenya to take advantage of the fast-growing market by either expanding their fruit and vegetable farms or to setup fruit and vegetable farms as one of their agribusiness subsidiaries.

What Is Fruit Farming About?

Fruit and vegetable farming is the cultivation of fruits and vegetables for human consumption. They can be grown by planting them in hanging baskets and window boxes or sown into dry or moist ground, and are widely consumed in many places around the world.

Facts and Benefits of Fruit Farming

Fruits and vegetables are one the world’s most popular source of food.

  1. China is the world’s largest producer of vegetable crops.
  2. fruits and vegetable farming is a great source of employment.
  3. Some fruits like tomatoes are very high in the carotenoid Lycopene. This means that eating them can lower your risk of cancer.
  4. A large amount of the nutrients in potatoes are just below the skin layer.
  5. Most vegetables don’t have to be stored in a fridge, but should be kept dark and dry.
  6. The Green-Yellow-Orange vegetables are rich sources of vitamin B-complex, vitamin-C, vitamin-A, vitamin K, calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, and beta-carotene.
  7. Fruits and vegetables are nutritious no matter their variant.
  8. Fruits and vegetables have a lot of fiber.
  9. Some fruits and vegetables contain toxins.
  10. Apples give an average human more energy than coffee.
  11. Tomatoes are botanically fruits because they have seeds.
  12. The skins of most fruits and vegetables are the most nutritious, and so, are better than the actual fruit.
  13. Orange peels are healthy because they contain a lot of fiber.

Business Opportunities in Fruit and Vegetable Farming

1). A Great Source of Food:

Fruits and vegetables have been feeding both humans and animals as far back as history has recorded. They’re highly nutritious and can serve as emergency meals in situations where cooking certain meals may take a long time to complete.

Some commonly consumed fruits include:

  • Apples
  • Oranges
  • Mangoes
  • Strawberries
  • Avocado
  • Tomatoes
  • Water Melons
  • Paw Paws

2). Consumer Goods:

Asides just serving as a great source of food, fruits and vegetables are also used in the production of consumer goods like hair dye, olive oil, jam, foot rub, and metal polish.

 

Setting Up Your Fruit and Vegetable Farming Business

1). Select the Fruit And/or Vegetable Crop You Intend to Cultivate:

The first step in starting a fruit and vegetable farming business is to decide what type of fruits or vegetables you intend to grow. As earlier stated, there are vast numbers of fruits and vegetables to choose from, and picking the right one or set is critical to growing a successful fruit and vegetable farm.

Some questions to ask yourself in your decision-making process are:

  • How resistant is this crop to pests and diseases?
  • Is there a large demand for this crop?
  • What are the risks of growing this crop?
  • Where and how will the fruits and vegetables be sold?
  • What volume of this crop should I first produce?

When you’ve answered the questions to the best of your knowledge and are satisfied with the preliminary results your fruit or vegetable crop of choice may fetch you, you can go ahead to start a fruit or vegetable farming business in that regard.

2). Choose A Suitable Farmland:

Depending on the type of fruit and/or vegetable crop you’ve decided to plant, you should choose a farmland that’d work perfectly for it. Some factors to consider in choosing a farmland include:

  • Access to sunlight
  • Topography
  • Demographic
  • Availability of water
  • Soil type

Every fruit and/or vegetable crop has the best type of soil or conditions in which it can grow, and your second job as a farmer is to choose the best farmland that’s suitable for the fruits and vegetables you’ve decided to grow.

3). Apply Manure and Start Planting:

Mix a soilless mix and a balanced manure that contains equal percentages of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium with the soil. Soilless mixes are sterile and will help rid the soil of weed and diseases, and provide great drainage for the vegetables.

Next, separate each vegetable per container and plant the seeds at the correct depth. Also ensure there’s enough spacing between the plants.

4). Irrigate

Water the plants carefully, at least once a day to keep the soil moist, and re-fertilize the soil when the plants begin to grow.

5). Harvest & Market:

After a couple of months, depending on which type of fruit and vegetable farming business you ventured into, the next step is to harvest your crops, keep them in optimal storage locations, and sell them through your supply chain network.

Challenges of Fruit and Vegetable Farming

Some of the challenges of fruit and vegetable farming in Kenya and many parts of Africa include:

1). Lack of experience

2). Land tenure insecurity

3). Low and unstable investment in agricultural research

4). Financial Constraints:

  • High interest rates.
  • Inaccessible credit due to tough conditions.
  • Expensive for manually irrigated and controlled environment.

5). Storage Constraints:

  • Poor storage methods.
  • Lack of post-harvesting preservation skills.
  • Theft.

6). Farm Inputs Constraints:

  • High prices of farm inputs.
  • Choice of variety to use.

7). Infrastructural Constraints:

  • Inaccessible roads.
  • Poor market facilities.

8). Marketing Constraints:

  • Price fluctuation.
  • Presence of middlemen.
  • Competition.

 

Fruit and vegetable farming in Kenya or Africa, is one agricultural sector with a lot of highly profitable sub-sectors. Whether you choose to focus on growing a fruit or vegetable, there’s an abundant market for the products, both locally in the country and for exportation to many parts of the world.

Book your seedlings today.

 

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Sweet Yellow Passion: What you need to Know

Passion fruit is among the most competitive fruits in Kenya with a great economic importance. Sweet yellow passion fruit is newly released in Kenya. Sweet yellow passion fruit has high demand from the juice makers as it yields more juice than the purple passion fruit. There are two main types of passion fruits; yellow and purple.

The sweet yellow passion fruit could soon overtake the once black gold of coffee if more farmers embrace its production in the country. Its farm gate price stands at Sh 70 per kilogram during the peak while those lucky farmers who produce the commodity at off peak can comfortably earn Sh 120 per kilogram. 

Yellow Passion fruit production

Mostly, passion fruit is round or oval, 4-6cm diameters. Vines commence cropping at 6 months of age and reach full bearing in 18 months. The vines have a productive life of 3 to 4 years. New plantings should be made on a continuous 3 year rotation to maintain production. Passion fruit grows well in cooler temperatures at an elevation of between 1200m-1800m above sea level east of the Rift Valley and up to 2000m above sea level west of the Rift valley.

More specifically, the purple passion fruit does well in the upper midland to upper highland zones (1200-1800m) while as the yellow passion fruit does well in the lower midland to lower lowland zones (up to 1200m). Further, the fruit does well in optimum temperatures, where the production of purple and yellow passion is between temperatures of 18-25 degrees Celsius and 25-30 degrees Celsius respectively.

To improve the profitability of yellow passion fruit cultivation, the development of technologies to increase yield productivity, especially those pertaining to the mineral nutrition and irrigation and fertilization is essential.

Related Content: The role of an Agronomist

Challenges

Challenges that smallholder farmers face in the production of passion fruit is the low volumes of produced fruits by individual smallholder which is uneconomical to sell individually;

  • pressure to sell to middlemen even at lower prices;
  • poor post-harvest handling due to lack of skills and capacity to maintain good post-harvest quality; pests and diseases, particularly die back disease.

 

Smallholder farmers in Kenya begun growing passion fruit as a result of the support gained from the Kenyan government, private foundations and bilateral and multilateral donors since the early 2000s. The gross value of an acre of passion fruit with a good harvest was estimated to be Ksh. 600,000 ($8,000), or 12 times as much as that of maize at the time.  Yellow passion fruit production has led to farmers earning sh. 10,000,000 in Meru County through a project initiated by Techno serve an NGO whose primary goal was to encourage farmers to produce more mangoes and yellow passion fruits which can access international markets with required residue levels.

Yellow passion fruit farmers have realized higher profits due to lower growing costs since the purple passion fruit requires spraying six times each fruit season, compared to three times a season for the yellow variety. The new variety has doubled fruit incomes, with industrial fruit processors opting for the yellow passion fruit over the purple passion fruit because it is sweeter, less acidic and bigger with more juice.

Passion fruit has quick financial returns for both the domestic and export markets because it takes only one year for the crop to mature.

Book yours today!

 

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Make money by Growing Passion fruit in Kenya

The creation of juice making companies in Kenya is gradually opening up avenues for Kenyan farmers to make money by producing raw materials for these industries. Until recently, Passion Fruit farming was done by major companies in Kenya. Passion Fruit has huge market potentials in the country and it is highly sought after in the international fruit market.

The passion fruits

Passion Fruit, (Passiflora edulis, a close relative to violets, is botanically part of the Passifloraceae family. There are more than 500 species in this family and more than 50 of them are edible. However, only the purple passion fruit and the yellow are grown commercially. The main variety for producing juice and juice concentrate is the yellow variety.

Passion fruit’s unique, intense, aromatic flavour characteristics and its “natural” ingredient make it viable for juice blends. It has also been described as a natural concentrate and it blends so well with other juice flavors. In Germany, one of the largest juice consuming countries in the world, passion fruit concentrate and banana puree constitute the base of almost every “multivitamin” juice produced. These “multivitamin” juices are second only to apple juice in popularity among Germans. In Brazil, the fruit is used in fresh beverages made both at home and in “stalls” or juice stands popular throughout the country.”

How passion fruit grows

The passion fruit is a vigorous, climbing vine that clings by tendrils to almost any support. It can grow 15 to 20 ft. per year once established and must have strong support. It can produce for five to seven years if good agronomy practices are adopted.

Related Post: Farmers already earning more from Macadamia nuts and hass Avocados

Planting the fruit

A farmer is expected to plant the vines in full sun except in very hot areas where partial shade is preferable. The vine can be rather rampant, so it is important to plant it next to a chain link fence or install a strong trellis before planting. The plants can also be cultured into an attractive arbor. Pruning is necessary to keep the vines within bounds, to make harvest easier and to keep the plants productive by maintaining vigorous growth.

Soil requirement

Passion fruit vines need fertile soils, probably additional fertiliser, and they appreciate all the compost and mulch you can spare. A healthy soil, teeming with worms and microbes and lots of organic matter is your best bet.

Irrigation

The root system of passion fruit is small for the size of the plant it has to sustain. Especially while a passion fruit is fruiting, it needs a lot of water. It needs a very regular water supply at all times. However, passion fruit can’t handle waterlogged soil. Make sure your site is free draining.

When to harvest

When the fruits are ripe they will drop. Dropping on the ground does not hurt the fruits. Passion fruit can be collected in bags and stored for weeks.

Market for passion fruits

There is growing consumer interest internationally in general and this means opportunity for Kenyan farmers.  According to the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations, the international market for passion fruit is growing due to the consumer trend of seeking more and more exotic fruit varieties.  The FAO Trade statistics in recent years show that the United States, EU, Japan and China are the largest importer of tropical fruits.

In addition, if you buy passion fruit seedlings from us, we guarantee a market for you. Call us today and place your order.

 

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Kenyan’s Diamonds are hanging on Tree Fruits

How huge is the potential for the fruits farming and export business in Kenya? You’re about to find out…

As millions of people around the world look for healthier and organic foods, fruits are growing in demand both locally and globally.

Apart from the millions of fruits that we eat at home in Kenya, many of us do not notice the huge volumes of bananas, avocados, pineapples, mangoes and several other tropical fruit varieties that are shipped to Europe, the Middle East and USA every week!

Kenya has a unique advantage to profit from this very lucrative market for tropical fruits which grow abundantly on our continent.

Why is the market potential for tropical fruits huge for Kenya?

apple fruits grown in Kenya
apple fruits grown in Kenya

In line with our tradition on Small starter, it’s important to us that our readers understand the market forces and economic opportunities behind every business opportunity we share.

Our research has identified three strong reasons why Africa’s future in the tropical fruits business is shining very bright.

Africa has a strong geographic advantage

More than 70 percent of fruits consumed on earth come from the tropics, which is why they’re called ‘tropical fruits’.

A very large portion of our dear continent is located in the tropics – a region that enjoys all-year-round sunlight and has a perfect climate for fruits to thrive and grow abundantly.

As a result, Africa remains one of the world’s largest producers of some of the most popular fruits on the planet – citrus, pineapples, bananas and many others.

Despite our continent’s huge potential to produce fruits for the world, a lot of fruits grown in Kenya are consumed locally.

Because fruits are highly perishable (spoil very quickly) and many farmers have little access to good storage facilities, Kenya currently exports less than 5 percent of the fruits it produces every year.

Related Content: make money through passion fruit farming

A growing demand for healthier and organic foods

Due to the revelations by modern science about the health benefits of eating fruits and, millions of people around the world (especially in developed countries) now include some form of fruit in their daily diets.

Apart from their rich nutrient, mineral and vitamin content, fruits are now known to lower blood pressure; reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, and probably some cancers; and help to lower the risk of eye and digestive system problems.

The growing consciousness in Western countries to adopt fruit-rich diets is one of the major drivers of the growing demand for tropical fruits which are abundant in Africa. As a result, countries like Ghana, South Africa, Ivory Coast and Kenya earn millions of dollars every year from fruit exports to Europe, the Middle East and USA.

According to the World Health Organisation, millions of people around the world still die prematurely from diseases associated with low fruit consumption. While this is sad, it signals a promising and lucrative growth in the demand for African tropical fruits now and in the future as more people add fruits to their diets.

A rapidly growing fruits juice industry

This rapid growth is driven by a rising preference by customers for healthy drinks (like fruit juices) over soft drinks (such as carbonated drinks – like Coke and Pepsi). There is also a rising demand for organic, super fruit and 100 percent natural fruit juices without any sweeteners and preservatives.

This means that in the very near future, producers will require more raw fruits to make a glass of juice.

As more manufacturers shop for fruits to produce more juice to serve the growing demand, Africa will become a huge supplier due to the abundance of fruits that grow on the continent. This added demand from fruit juice manufacturers is allowing farmers across Africa to process their harvested fruits into less perishable concentrates thereby reducing spoilage and earning them more money.

Make an effort today by calling us. We have all types of tree fruits. Book Now!

 

 

 

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Plant hass avocado as a retirement plan

Maybe you have always dreamed about retiring when you hit 60—or even before you get at 50. Having a clear focus and a plan to retire early can be empowering. It feels good to have a purpose and a strategy. plant hass avocado today and you will never regret.

Grab this opportunity to think about what “early” and “retirement” mean to you—and set yourself on a path to bring that vision to life. Some successful early retirees who now blog about their experience prefer the term “financial independence” to “retirement”: The essence is that you, and not an employer, get to call the shots on how you spend your days. That might be a pleasant schedule of travel and community service or maybe working as hard as—or harder than—before on a new business venture you’ve always hoped to pursue.

That’s not to say that making an early exit is easy, though. The more ambitious your vision, the more important it is to start saving and planning as soon as possible and the more compromises between your current lifestyle and future goals you’ll likely need to make.

Related Post: The role of an Agronomist

Consider Avocado Farming

Hass Avocado treeHass avocados matures between 2-3 years, have a long-life span of more than 50 years and you are guaranteed of the market for the fruits. Hass avocado is an investment like no other. With only 40, 000 per acre you can be getting a minimum of KSh 500,000 per year. Oxfarm Organic Ltd plant 150 seedlings per acre and each tree can produce over 1000 fruits per year with the current price of KSh 15 per fruit.

Take for example an employee aged 40 years, and earning an average of 50,000 per month. He can plan an early exit today. What many people don’t know is that working for a person is pursuing someone’s dreams. What about your dreams? We all get it, one needs capital to either start a company or a business. But the question we ask people is, how long have your land laid idle? Five, seven, fifteen years? Now do the math, get out of your comfort zone, plant avocados today and have all the freedom you want. With an avocado farm, you can do other things since avocados require minimal maintenance.

Yes, plant fruit trees, hass avocado, and other perennial crops with haste. For those who work in the office day after day, such can be incorporated in the retirement plan. Such a farm can be a comfortable retreat after years of going back and forth to office. As admitted by those traditional monocrop corn farmers, it can raise the market value of a farm and so it can become a sound investment.

Take a loan if you have to, plant hass avocados and we guarantee you, soon you will fire your boss. We are supporters of anyone who grows avocados.

 

Book your seedlings today, prepare early for next season and two three years to come you will laugh all the way to the market. Call us today for more information.

 

 

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Why you Should Consider Farming as a career

Farming is a Career

Most Kenyan youths don’t think farming as a career choice. When I was growing up, I was told I could be anything I wanted: An astronaut, a doctor, a lawyer, or even a law-practicing doctor on the moon. But no one ever mentioned becoming a farmer.

But why? Why is this profession sidelined? It’s a job, after all. It’s a way to make a living. Anyone with an entrepreneurial spirit might be interested; anyone who loves animals might want to check out farming; anyone who loves being outside would probably want to be a farmer.

I just want to put it out there: If you want to become a farmer, you can. Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

If you have high school or college aged children who “don’t know what they want to be when they grow up,” consider suggesting that they investigate becoming a farmer. It’s no different than considering being a doctor, an astronaut, a banker, a teacher, a writer, a model, or a retail store manager.

If no one has suggested that you consider farming as a career, then let me be the first.

Today’s teenagers, my contemporaries (the folks in their 20s), and people in their 30s and 40s should really think about it.

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But I Don’t Know Anything About Farming!

AgribusinessThat’s okay! You didn’t know how to read until someone taught you, right? And you didn’t know how to drive until you learned.

I almost hate to say this, because it does sort of take some of the romanticism out of farming, but there really are no skills associated with farming that the average person can’t learn and even master. Even if you’re not very mechanically inclined, it’s all just nuts and bolts. Even if you’ve never grown anything, it’s just about supplying the plants with what they need to grow properly, and paying attention to them, and learning when it’s time to harvest. Working with livestock animals is no different. What does someone who has never owned a dog do when they decide to get a dog? Research! Books! The internet! Maybe they even go take a class at their local pet store or community college about how to take care of a dog.

My suggestion to anyone interested in learning how to farm would be to try to find a small family-farm where you can volunteer, or even take an internship. Look at it like going to college. Go to farmer’s markets and meet people who are already farming. Talk to them – they would probably love to talk to you. I literally have yet to meet anyone who operates a farm and doesn’t want to talk about it and share what they do. Come to us we will talk to you.

Small-scale farming may be the one business where the more people there are doing it, the better off everyone in the business will be. My point is that the information is all out there, and if you’re motivated you can get it. You do not need to be the son or daughter, or even grandchild of a farmer to become one yourself.

But Farming Is Hard Work!

This is true. But so is sitting at a computer all day, or running after toddlers in the daycare that you manage, or being an important (but very stressed out) financial analyst for a big company. In general, work is hard. That’s why we call it work. It doesn’t really matter what kind of work it is.

The benefits of working in farming versus working in, say, an office, are so numerous that I should probably just write another article on the topic. But to name a few, here goes:

  • Exercise! Stop paying for that gym membership and buying workout videos. As a farmer, you’ll get plenty of exercise and you’ll naturally get into and stay in shape.
  • Sunshine! Forget the tanning booth and get a “farmer’s tan!” Okay, maybe that’s not so glamorous, but being out in the sun gets you some Vitamin D, and it’s good for the spirit, too.
  • Eat better! Vegetables are much more fun to eat when you’ve grown them yourself. Raise your own beef, pork, chicken, lamb or some other kind of meat, and you will get to decide what the animal will eat and what kind of life it will have before it goes to the butcher. It’s trite, but it’s true: You are what you eat.
  • Live in the seasons! You should get to experience more than one season through the year, and if you work in a “climate controlled” environment I think you’ll appreciate what I’m saying. Life is fuller when you get to be too hot and sweaty, when you get to be cold, when you get to watch the subtle change in green from summer to autumn, when you become aware of the approaching spring because the air quality changes, when you can “smell” winter coming. The natural world is so much more complex than I think we will ever understand, much less appreciate.

But Success Isn’t Guaranteed in Farming!

Nothing is certain. And bad things can happen to any business; small farms are certainly not excluded from this rule.

If the uncertainty of success in a small farming business venture is what really turns you off, then I would encourage you to consider some other profession.

Let’s take banking, for instance. You might get a job with a well-known, successful bank. You might move up the ranks and end up with a job making $170,000 per year. You might work for this bank until you’re 40 or 50.

And this bank might fail. It might merge with another bank and lay you off. The Powers That Be might decide that your position is no longer essential to business functions.

There is no guarantee of success in any career. At least if you’re a farmer, you will have a more direct effect on the chances for success. And if something goes horribly wrong, you will be the one to decide how to react to it.

If the storm comes and you can weather it, you can succeed. There’s no gain without risk, no winning without trying, and no success without some failure intermixed.

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Independence and Self-Reliance

If I’m not mistaken everyone has this “dream” that has to do with becoming an independent, self-reliant person; someone who takes care of themselves and their own. Maybe that way of thinking doesn’t even apply anymore, but I think there is real value in choosing a profession that will allow you to eventually become an independent person.

The way I see it, I have two options in terms of careers (and so does everyone else):

  1. I can work for someone else, doing something that they have deemed to be important to the function of their business (the government included), and in exchange for my work they will pay me money that I can live off of.
  2. I can start my own business and work for myself, doing something that I’m interested in, and I will earn money that I will allocate to myself, and I will reinvest my earnings in the business

There’s risk involved either way.

It appears to me that life is fraught with uncertainty, and maybe I’m a bit of a control-freak but I’d rather be as independent as possible than rely on someone else to make sure that I can put food on my table and a roof over my head.

I don’t think there’s a profession out there that allows for more independence than farming. First, you produce your own food, then you produce excess food, and you sell that food to others.

It’s the profession I’m headed for, anyway. Thanks for reading this article – truth is, I wrote it for myself as much as for anyone else

To start with, consider fruit farming. Contact us today for booking.