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Passion Fruit Farming In Kenya on the rise Again

The prospects of passion fruit farming in Kenya may change for the higher if plans to elevate the fruit into a significant farming crop are adopted by the Ministry of Agriculture.

This is once details emerged that Kenya’s production of the passion Fruit has been on the decline for the past decade within which no passion fruit exports visited Europe.

During a stakeholders’ forum for farmers, consumers and development partners, Fresh Produce Exporters Association of Kenya chairman Apollo Owuor said the country produced and exported passion fruit in massive scale within the 90’s and early 2000.

Related Post: How well-planned are you for tree fruit farming this season?

However, since 2003 it declined principally owing to pest management challenges a number of that contravened European markets’ strict tips on pesticides residue, with Kenya’s passion fruit reported to contain higher than acceptable limits.

In Addition, Mr. Owuor said that there haven’t been efforts to revive the trade since, partially as a result of passion fruit being listed as a minor farming crop by the Ministry of Agriculture thus it’s not within the government’s policy for priority support.

Passion Fruit is listed as a minor crop

Agriculture Food Authority Horticulture Crops Directorate head Zakayo Magara acknowledged that as a result of passion fruit being listed aboard a hundred different minor crops and little has been in advancing a policy to market and boost its cultivation.

In effect, the Council of Governors Agriculture Committee, depicted by Anne Koech, a county govt member accountable of agriculture in Kericho County, created a commitment to support the elevation of the crop to major crops standing in order that resources can be allotted to its development in counties appropriate for its cultivation.

She said county governments ought to likewise subsidize its seedlings purchase to boost production and additionally produce market linkages to contour selling.

Related post: Best Tips of Growing Grapes In Kenya

Research has shown that passion fruit will grow anyplace in Kenya owing to convenience of sorts for each hotter and colder climate – yellow passion for lower, hotter regions and therefore a lot of common purple selection for the upper cooler regions.

Experts at the stakeholders’ forum noted that there’s potential for Kenya to be a world leader in tropical juice production owing to its year-round convenience of tropical fruits like passion fruit, mangoes and pineapples, being a rustic that may grow these crops in turn.

Through passion fruit cultivation, farmers will observe better financial gain.

(Source: Brian Okinda, Seeds of Gold; Jan 27,2018)

We have already started preparing for the long rains, Book your seedlings today. Seedlings are delivered on a first-come basis.

 

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Cultivation of Mangoes in Kenya

The mango industry in Kenya has expanded considerably over recent years, not only in size but also in the geographical location of commercial and homestead plantings. Mango is one of the most important fruit crops in the tropical and subtropical lowlands. It is native to India, Bangladesh, Myanmar and Malaysia, but can be found growing in more than 60 other countries throughout the world.

Also Read: Tips on how to get over 20Kgs/Tree from Tree-tomato farming

Counties Where Mangoes can be grown in Kenya

No longer is commercial mango cultivation restricted to the Coast region, as significant plantings of improved cultivars now also exist in the Makueni county,Meru County, Murang’a County, Nairobi County, Nakuru County, Siaya County, Taita-Taveta County, Tana River County, Tharaka Nithi County, Bungoma County, Kitui County, Embu County, Machakos County, Kiambu County among other regions.

 

Basically, In Kenya 7 out of 8 provinces produce mangoes. But the generally arid eastern region produces 61 per cent of all mangoes, followed by Rift Valley at 30 per cent and Coast, which produces 28 per cent.

 

As a result of this expansion, the mango fruit is becoming more popular with the local population. Despite this increasing popularity, only a few consumers and potential growers are familiar with the characteristics of the many different cultivars of mango that are now grown and available in the country.

 

Varieties of Mangoes Grown in Kenya

These include Apple, Ngowe, Kent, Keitt, Tommy Artkins, Van Dyke, Haden, Sensation, Boribo, Sabine among others. Main characteristics that differentiate varieties are the fruit shape, size, aroma, sweetness, colour, fibre content, taste, seed size and resistance to diseases. Proper selection of a mango cultivar for production has to take into account the following criteria:

  • good adaptation to the local conditions (e.g. rainfall and dry periods)
  • alternation of flowering and fruiting
  • tolerance to pest and disease infections
  • designated use and market requirements

 

The mango is best adapted to a warm tropical monsoon climate with a pronounced dry season (>3 months) followed by rains. However, information from other countries indicates that crops

cultivated for a long time over an extended area show a high degree of diversity due to varied environmental influences

Economic Importance of Mangoes include;

  • Consumed as fresh fruits
  • Source of income
  • Source of foreign exchange
  • Source of employment
  • Combats nutritional disorders

Also Read: How well-planned are you for tree fruit farming this season?

For more information about mangoes farming visit our offices. Also, book your seedlings today!!!

 

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Amazing Health Benefits of Plums

Plum Fruits are amazing for human body, mainly for preventing cancer. You call it plum when it is fresh, and you call it prune when it is dried, but both of them are full of nutrients. So no matter which type that you eat, you can still reap the benefits. They are packed with an immense range of phenols and flavonoids, which offer an impressive range of health benefits. Listed below are few of the health benefits of plum fruit

Cardiovascular Health

Regular consumption of plums is quite beneficial for maintaining cardiovascular health. Research has proven that the regular intake of dried plums helps in promoting fluidity of blood in the arteries. This protective effect aids in the prevention of various cardiac complaints, including the development of atherosclerosis and the reduction in chances for heart attacks and strokes.

Also Read: How to establish grafted purple passion Fruits Orchard

Prevent Cancer

Several researches have proven that the plum extracts have been proven beneficial in the treatment of cancer. Research has shown that the component epicatechin, present in plums, helps in preventing the growth and proliferation of malignant cancer cells and encourages apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma or liver cancer. They are rich in antioxidants and phytonutrients, including chlorogenic acid and neo-chlorogenic acid which have a restorative effect on breast cancer cells, without harming the normal healthy cells of the body.

Prevent Osteoporosis

Regular Consumption of dried plums exerts anabolic and anti-resorptive actions, which aid in maintaining healthy bones. Plums consist of Flavonoids such as caffeic acid and rutin which helps in preventing the deterioration of bone tissues and prevent diseases such as osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Polyphenols, along with the potassium content present in dried plums, encourage the formation of bones, enhances bone density and prevents bone loss caused by ovarian hormone deficiency. Research has proven that regular consumption of dried plums helps in the restoration of bone density that has already been lost due to aging.

Boost Immunity

Plums consist of Vitamin C which is proven beneficial in strengthening the immune defense of the body. It helps to promote the body’s resistance against various infections and inflammations. Research has shown that oriental plums have immune-stimulatory constituents that encourage the production of nitric oxide in the body, obstruct the metastasis of tumor cells, and are valuable in preventing various diseases.

 Skin Care

Plum consists of huge amount of vitamin C, along with other antioxidants, which help to maintain healthy, radiant and youthful skin. Regular consumption of plums helps in reducing dark spots and wrinkles due to the presence of anti-aging nutrients. Plum extracts are used in various skin care products such as face wash and packs.

Control Diabetes

Plums use anti-hyperglycemic effects and help in combating diabetes. Research has shown that the consumption of plum extracts aids in the reduction of blood glucose and levels of triglyceride in the body. Flavonoids present in plums exert protective effects against insulin resistance and help to enhance insulin sensitivity in the body

Regulate Cholesterol Levels

Dried plums or prunes are quite helpful in preventing hypercholesterolemia and hyperlipidemia. Research has proven the effectiveness of prunes over grape-juice in maintaining healthy levels of plasma and liver cholesterol. Fiber content present in it also adds to the protective effect of the heart by reducing LDL cholesterol and helping to elevate the levels of HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol)

Cure Influenza

Japanese plums are effective against the infection caused by influenza A virus. Research has shown that concentrated juice of Japanese plums contains lectin-like molecules which help in inhibiting and treating the infections caused by human influenza A virus.

Improve Cognitive Health

Researches have shown that the flavonoids present in plum juice are effective in providing protection against age-related cognitive impairment. Beneficial phytonutrients present in plums help in reducing the inflammation in the neurological areas to improve learning and memory functions. Regular consumption of plums also helps in preventing age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

Removes Dandruff

Vitamin C in the plum can help you get rid of dandruff. Hair follicles often get clogged due to dandruff and flaky skin. This damages the follicles and inhibits the hair growth, if not treated in time. Plums can help fight the bacteria on the scalp and soothe the skin to ward off dandruff. This will get rid of the follicles debris and encourage new hair growth.

 

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How To Grow Peaches And Nectarines

Peaches and Nectarines are within the scope of all to grow successfully in this Kenya, no matter where you live. The way in which you grow them can be varied according to climate, locality and position but they can be a real triumph and are generally hardier than is often realized.

The Peach and Nectarine tree flowers early – second only in this respect to the Apricot – and usually opens blossom from the end of March. For this reason, some protection is advisable so that the flowers do not become frosted and if this happens you may lose some or all of your crop. As far as the winter goes well they are usually quite frost tolerant whilst dormant and only extreme or prolonged cold temperatures will harm them.
They can be grown as bush trees in the open in more favorable counties, against a warm sunny wall as ‘fan trained’ and in containers. Or if you have a nice greenhouse, conservatory or sun lounge why not afford them some luxury? o

The best position

Is of course the most favorable one you can afford. Soil isn’t very critical as long as it has good drainage and I haven’t found PH to be particularly important. They resent poor drainage and heavy clay soils might be problematical overwinter as the ground gets so cold and wet. Under those conditions better to grow them in containers.
The more sunshine your tree gets the better the fruits will be – bigger, rosier, sweeter. The tree will revel in its position and ripen more wood to use as flower production for ever greater crops. Peach and Nectarine trees can be planted at any time of the year

Planting itself – best practices

Dig a hole large enough to take the roots. The root system can vary quite a lot in size according to variety, Rootstock and the land the tree has been grown on as well as the age of the tree. So, don’t dig the holes in advance, wait until you have the tree and can see what you have got to work with. The tree should be planted at a depth similar to that it was set at before on the Nursery; you can usually still see the soil mark on the stem and so use this as a guide. If you can’t maybe the trunk was washed by heavy rain or whatever then sue the grafting point as your guide. The graft is often clearly to be seen as a bulge or kink in the stem not far above the roots. It may still have wax or tree sealant on it as well. This grafting point should always be kept above the soil lebel so make sure it is sitting about 2” above the soil ideally. It should never be buried. The roots themselves should always have not less than 2” of soil over them.
Make sure the tree is firmed in well when you are satisfied with it, use the heel of your boot and press down repeatedly and firmly all around the circumference of the trunk. Peaches and Nectarines do not normally need much of a stake, if the position is an open one then insert a good tree stake of 48” length into the ground before planting. Tie to it with a rubber strap. Tree guards are a necessity where rabbits or deer may be a problem.

Pruning Bush trees

Immediately after planting, if the tree is a maiden, the main stem should be cut just above a bud at approximately 3 feet from the ground and any side shoots cut back to just 2 or 3 buds from the main stem. These young side shoots are called feathers, any that are closer to the ground than 2 feet should be removed.
Thereafter during subsequent seasons select a number of semi mature growths which should be pruned back by about a third each Spring. This encourages strong new growth which is what will bear the fruits next year.

Also Read: Amazing benefits of Plums

Pests and diseases

There is really only the one significant problem associated with Peach and Nectarine trees and that is Peach Leaf curl which can and will affect both Peach and Nectarine trees, but does not touch Apricots.
It is easily identifiable because the leaves twist, curl and ‘bubble’ and come out in rather alarming red blisters. Sometimes trees can be completely disfigured by it. It looks a lot worse than it is and the best remedy for infected trees is to remove all the affected foliage and destroy it. This can leave a tree almost denuded of foliage but don’t worry, it will quickly leaf again and the new foliage will be ‘clean’ and won’t become infected again that season.
There were effective control sprays for leaf curl but they have been removed, meaning there is only one precautionary measure available to gardeners wishing to avoid this disease. The fungal spores are spread by moisture droplets in the air. Therefore, if the tree is kept dry during the key period when these spores are active – which is very early spring just as the tree start to break dormancy – then the problem can largely be eliminated or at least reduced significantly. Bush trees of modest size, fans against a wall, and pot grown trees are fairly easily protected from rain during this essential period. Cover with a transparent material until the leaves are fully open, usually by May it can be removed and the period for infection has passed for another year. That is why trees grown in greenhouses or inside seldom get much if any leaf curl.
Aphids, greenfly and red spider mite may also attack Peach and Nectarine trees. Spray with soapy water, use biological controls, or buy a systemic insecticide or a so called ‘bug gun’ – all will provide effective treatment.

Pollination

There are no pollination issues with Peach and Nectarine at all as all varieties are self-fertile and lone trees will provide a good crop with no need for a pollinating partner. The only thing to remember is that trees grown under cover will need hand pollinating with a soft haired brush because there won’t be any flying insects around to do the job for you. Hand pollinating can also increase the yield employed outside, especially if the weather is inclement during flowering and insects may not be on the wing.

Thinning the fruits

This isn’t really a necessary practice unless you want to concentrate the trees energy into a lesser number of larger fruits. This of course has the effect of increased fruit size and the class of the fruit produced. It might be a consideration if your tree seems to be over producing because then you might end up with a lot of smaller fruit which may be no less enjoyable. For gorgeous big ripe fruits of peach and nectarine, remove every other fruit along the branch when about the size of an acorn, allowing the rest to develop to maximum magnificence. Remember that the tree may shed some fruits of its own accord, and this is especially true if it becomes dry at the roots during crop formation.

Also Read: How to establish grafted purple passion Fruits Orchard

 

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Common challenges to mango production in Kenya

Many farmers in Kenya invest in mango orchards. However, there are a number of production-related hindrances at farm level, including:

Limited access to good quality planting materials

-There is a general shortage of grafted planting materials of improved and higher yielding varieties in many areas. Farmers often use inferior seedlings obtained by germinating mango seeds from indigenous varieties. Such ungrafted trees take much longer to bear fruit. Whereas grafted trees begin to bear fruit within 3 to 4 years, ungrafted trees will take at least 5 years to bear fruit, depending on the growing conditions.

Pest and disease problems

Mangoes have many devastating pests and diseases, which can result in total yield loss. Major pests include the fruit fly (Bactrocera invadens), seed weevil (Sternochetus mangiferae) and mealy bugs (Rastrococcus invadens). Diseases like anthracnose and powdery mildew are common in almost all mango growing areas.

Poor orchard management –

In many areas, mango trees are left to grow so big that pest and disease management, harvesting and other field operations are difficult to implement. Except in big or commercial farms, mango trees are normally scattered around the gardens, ranging from 2 to 100 trees per household. This scattered nature makes mango a commonly neglected crop in terms of management, but becomes important only during the harvesting season.

Also Read: how to grow peaches and nectrines

Post-harvest losses

Fruit damage is a common problem as a result of poor pest and disease management and the poor harvesting practices. Also, a lot of fruit is lost after harvest, especially during the peak seasons due to the limited capacity to store and process fruit. This is further worsened by the poor roads and transport infrastructure to markets.

Limited returns from mango production

Mango is highly seasonal and harvest is only expected at certain times of the year

depending on the local conditions. During this time, most areas are harvesting and so the local markets are saturated and, therefore, offer very low prices, which may not even cover transportation costs.

For more information about mango farming in Kenya, visit our offices. In addition book your seedlings today!!

 

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Why Record Keeping is Important in Fruit Farming

 

Production record-keeping is an important task for any fruit or crop farm, whether small, medium or large.

Currently, government agencies, lenders, and insurance companies are requiring better and more accurate records. Not only bushels per acre, income and expenses, but also weather records are becoming increasingly necessary.

An important tool for any Fruit or crop production farming operation, regardless of size, is having and maintaining a recordkeeping system for crop production. A common question that often gets asked is why should I keep production records? There are several reasons as follows: keeping records meets the requirements of various farming regulations; complete and accurate records help demonstrate your protection of soil, water and other environmental resources; records will help you analyze the performance of your farm’s cropping system; records may provide liability protection in the event of a complaint or lawsuit concerning your farming operation; and complete records demonstrate conformance with regulations.

The Recordkeeping System for fruit Production is designed for recording pesticide applications, nutrient applications, manure applications, animal burial and composting, irrigation, employee training, and pesticide drift management plans.

Also Read: Why Hass Avocado is the new Cash Crop

Lenders and Insurance Need your records

From the business aspect of the operation, record keeping is needed for future analysis of production methods, cropping history, and decision making. Record keeping provides valuable information concerning what worked and what did not and possibly, the reasons why something did not turn out as planned. As we all know, the best production methods and hybrids can fail due to weather conditions. Keeping daily records of precipitation and high and low temperatures is easy to accomplish and you can have a fairly accurate weather station. A high/low thermometer, rain gauge, something to record them on, and about ten minutes a day is all that is needed.

One set of accurate records should be enough to satisfy all your needs. If you keep good records of production, expenses, income, and weather, you should have all the required information for any purpose, from crop insurance to lenders to your own needs. You should be able to make informed conclusions regarding the past and to plan for the future.

Good records lead to better decisions and hopefully higher returns.

For more information on recordkeeping for fruit or crop production, contact Oxfarm Organic Ltd, Extension horticulture educators for tree fruit Production.

Also Read: how to grow peaches and nectrines

 

 

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Growing Lemons in Your Backyard

Favored by gardeners and cooks, lemons do not  only seem  attractive, but they bear fruit most year round.

If there’s one tree that ought to be included in each garden it’s a lemon tree. Not only attractive with shiny leaves and white flowers, lemons bear fruit most year round. And as it’s a tiny low to medium-sized tree, it’s ideal for little gardens.

CONDITIONS

While they grow best in warm, temperate and sub-tropical areas, you’ll grow them in cold midland areas if you plant them in an exceedingly protected spot. In exceptionally cold areas, plant them in massive pots which will be stirred onto a terrace or below the roof overhang during cold weather condition.

VARIETIES

  • The Cape rough-skinned lemon will well in colder areas. however, remember that the skin comes off sort of a naartjie which implies it’s tasking to slice.

  • Smooth-skinned Eureka is that the preferred selection. It doesn’t handle frost well therefore it desires a protected spot against a north or west-facing wall. And once it’s young, keep it coated with garden fleece on cold winter nights.

  • The Meyer selection is slighter sweeter and a lot of compact creating it ideal for pots. massive pots are essential so they don’t dry out too quickly. Raise them off the bottom on bricks or stones to enhance the avoidance and air flow.

Also Read: The role of an Agronomist

PLANTING

Lemon trees want a sunny spot in soil that drains well.

Dig an oversized hole. Keep the top soil and the sub soil separate. to every pile add compost, some of organic fertilizer and 1-2 cups of 2:3:2, ideally organic. If the soil is clay, add coarse river sand and peanut shells to enhance the drainage.

Put some of the sub soil back to the outlet. Place the tree at constant level as it was within the bag or pot and fill in around it with soil. Leave the top soil until last. Firm the soil and water well.

Read Also: The benefits of certified fruit seedlings

CARE AND MAINTENANCE

To encourage fruiting, feed with 3:1:5 fertilizer each four months. Apply some of Epsom salts each few months and water in well.

Water trees often and deeply, a minimum of twice per week, and a lot of for pots. Mulch with compost to forestall the soil from drying out.

To let in light-weight and air, prune gently once every crop and before they flower once more.

PESTS AND DISEASES

Look out for citrus psylla that causes little bumps on the leaves. Remove and destroy the  infected leaves and spray the undersides of all  leaves with an eco-friendly product like Bioneem or Pyrol.

Aphids, white woolly insects that leave a black, pitchy substance on the undersides of leaves, may also be a problem. Spray with Efekto Oleum as counseled on the pack till the leaves are clear.

For more information about tree fruit farming, visit our offices. Book your seedlings today!!!

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Passion Fruit Farming: How to get 15-20 tonnes per hectare

Passion fruit, a climbing vine, may be a versatile crop whose demand is growing in  export as well as domestic markets.

The fruit are often eaten fresh or consumed after extracting the pulp and creating juice.

The juice is used in a very  many forms of products and also the pulp could also be added to completely different dishes. A large range of cosmetic merchandise and food flavours are derived from the fruit that’s made in Vitamins A and C and carotene.

Varieties

Yellow and purple varieties exist. Purple varieties do higher at higher altitudes than the yellow varieties. Yellow varieties, on the other hand, tend to yield higher and is more resistant against diseases.

The purple selection is acidic, varies in style and succulence with intense aromatic scent and spherical in form. The yellow selection is greater, with similar taste however presumably less aromatic, a lot of acidic and is also additionally spherical in form.

Both varieties are green before ripening, and they are big for industrial and domestic functions.

Ecological necessities

Passion fruits perform well in a very wide selection of altitudes from 1200m to 1,800m on top of water level East of the Rift valley  and up to 2,000m on top of water level West of the Rift valley.

Optimum temperature for purple passion fruit is between 180C to 250C and 250C to 300C for yellow passion fruit whereas the rain ought to be well-distributed, between 900mm to 2000mm p.a..

Excess rain causes poor fruit set and encourages diseases principally leaf and fruit rusts. For good production, passion fruits do well in a  variety of soils, that ought to be moderately deep and fertile with soil PH going  between 6.0 and 6.5.

In high rainy areas, the soils ought to be well-drained as plants won’t face up to waterlogging or flooding. Some passion fruit enterprises that were doing well in Uasin Gishu County some 5 years ago  folded thanks to soil acidity (pH < 5.0), that reduces nutrient uptake and accelerates Fusarium wilt disease that causes rot of roots and stems finally drying of the entire plant. Farmers are encouraged to use manure and lime within the holes and whole field to cut back the soil acidity effects.

Planting and trellising

Passion fruit are often grown from seeds however grafting often produces improved stock. Yellow passion fruit is best for production of rootstock thanks to superior disease resistance whereas purple is sweet for fruit production.

Seeds germinate in four weeks after removal of the pulp and drying. Production of seedlings in plastic luggage is that the most used methodology.

Up to 3 seeds are planted in every bag then reduced to 1 after emergence. Seedlings would force up to four months to achieve an acceptable transplanting growth stage. After about seven weeks of growth following transplanting, each plant ought to have up to four healthy lateral stems.

Transplanting ought to be done at the start of the season around April-June. Passion fruit has deep roots, therefore soils ought to be well-tilled. Transplant to a field with posts having wire trellis to support the growing crop and fruits made.

The vines are sometimes directed in order that growth is in each directions on the supporting wires. Yields are highest following a regular fertilization regime. Old or dead shoots ought to be pruned. Intercropping with vegetables or different annuals is suggested to maximize free area particularly once the crop is young.

Once established, the vines grow speedily and the fruit ought to flower after about seven months. Ideally, young passion vines ought to be set within the field early in the season when there’s no danger of drought.

Passion vines are planted 2m from one row to the opposite and 3m from one plant to the other. Horizontal trellises have cross-pieces at the highest of every post with 2 to four wires set up horizontally 60cm apart on the highest of every cross-piece.

Vertical trellises accommodate significant posts without cross-pieces, with 2 to 3 wires set up on the row like wire fencing, hooked up to the posts from the highest down at intervals of regarding 30-40cm apart.

Trellis wires ought to be size nine or ten galvanized steel. The posts got to be stout enough to face up to the load of the vines and fruits produced throughout a season that unremarkably includes the blow of robust winds. Ideally, they ought to be long enough to produce a trellis height of 1.5m, with 45-75cm within the ground. Trellis rows ought to be oriented north-south for max exposure to daylight, and also the vines ought to be allowed to conjoin on the trellises to market cross-pollination.

Read Also:The role of an Agronomist

Fertilizer application

At planting, use 175g of Triple Super Phosphate (TSP) and one ‘debe’ (about 20kg) of yard manure and mix well. To get high yields, regular fertilization is critical.

Apply 300g of metal nitrate (CAN) per plant p.a. in 2 applications of 150g each during rainy season. Spraying with foliar feeds and trace components is additionally suggested.

Crop protection

Weeding is crucial once the plants are in initial stages. Diseases is sometimes sufficiently controlled by crop rotation as plantations are not kept for over 3 years.

Infected stuff ought to be pruned and destroyed and vines kept as open as attainable to permit thorough application of sprays. Diseases may be controlled by combination of excellent management, smart plantation hygiene, and an acceptable spray programme.

Pests lower fruit quality and will be controlled by often checking the areas round the plantation for signs of build-up. If necessary, spray to manage the pests before they unfold to the crop.

Harvest

When prepared for harvesting, the skin of the fruit is deep purple or yellow. Its pulpy interior is bright yellow, full of tiny black seeds. For contemporary market or use, the fruit is picked once color changes occur.

For processing, the fruit is allowed to drop to the bottom and picked a minimum of each second day. At this stage, the fruit is shriveled however quite appropriate for process. Yields decline every year till harvests don’t seem to be adequate within the four year.

Yield and incomes

Yields of over 15-20 tonnes/ha are attainable. In one year, a farmer might earn up to Sh1 million per acre as compared to Sh35,000-Sh60,000 for wheat or maize.

Read Also:The benefits of certified fruit seedlings

For more information visit our offices. Book your grafted purple passion seedlings today.

 

Purple passion fruit seedling

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Avocado Exports Banned for one Month Due To Rising Local Prices

The Directorate of Horticulture has banned all avocado exports following a severe shortage that has raised costs of the fruit to a three-and-a-half-year high.

The average worth of a 90-kilogramme bag of avocado shot up to Sh2,560 in December, creating it the very best value of the artifact since May 2014, when a bag was merchandising for slightly higher than Sh2,700.

A single avocado is presently selling for between Sh50 and Sh80 in Nairobi’s retail markets, up from between Sh10 and Sh20 each throughout peak season.

The Agriculture and Food Authority (AFA), where that the Directorate of Horticulture falls, attributes the rise within the worth of the fruit to the biting shortage of widespread varieties, Fuerte and Hass, that are off-season.

Read Also:Why Record Keeping is Important in Fruit Farming

Why AFA has Banned Avocado Exports

“We have stopped the export of Fuerte and Hass varieties because of traders would ship out immature crop thanks to high demand within the world market. However, we’re planning to elevate (the ban) beginning next month once harvest starts,” said AFA director-general Alfred Busolo.

Avocado is very widespread on Kenyans’ eating tables. Most households mix it with different foods or eat it plain.

“The shortage isn’t solely in Kenya, however additionally globally. This is often the explanation why the costs have gone up,” further Mr. Busolo. The ban on exports was settled in December.

Mr. Busolo says the shortage is predicted to ease beginning next month once the new season crop can begin to touch the market.

“Fuerte selection can begin attending to the market next month whereas Hass are going to be in offer in March, bridging this deficit and reversing costs to the previous lows,” he said.

The Jumbo avocado selection is presently the only one offered within the market.

This selection is often in offer throughout the year however it’s not as widespread as Fuerte and Hass.

Avocado contributes seven per cent of Kenya’s total fruit export to the international market however production has been static over the years. Farm production stood at 230,948 tonnes in 2015, rising slightly to 246,057 tonnes in 2016.

About 387.2 tonnes valued Sh5.4 billion was exported in 2016, compared to 461.1 tonnes value Sh7.1 billion last year as per AFA information. Foreign investors are keen on finance the avocado sub-sector in Kenya thanks to its low-risk investment surroundings, wide market access, and improved infrastructure.

The Netherlands fund launched a $1 million project in 2016 to boost the export fight of the avocado sector in Kenya.

The project’s strategy includes change the artifact commodity business plan for the avocado sub-sector and increasing the export capability of exportation SMEs and farmer teams linking them to international consumers.

The horticultural sector is one amongst the biggest sources of interchange earnings in Kenya, bringing in more than Sh101 billion in 2016.

Now you know why we insist on farmer to plant more hass avocados, the demand and the market is ways above us. Book your seedlings today!

Read Also : The role of an Agronomist

 

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Healthy benefits of Macadamia nuts

Macadamias are an underestimated nutrient-powerhouse. A rich source of essential vitamins and minerals including vitamin A, iron, B vitamins, and folate. They also have a little protein and pack a healthy dose of good fats and antioxidants.

Commonly featured in more indulgent desserts rather than thought of as an everyday health food, macadamias are often skipped for almonds and cashews for a daily snack. But these 10 fascinating health benefits of macadamias will show you why they’re worthy of a regular spot in your healthy nut rotation:

Helps To Keep Your Heart Healthy!

These nuts are rich in healthy monounsaturated fats which are said to be cardioprotective by reducing cholesterol level and help to clean the arteries. Macadamia also lowers the level of triglycerides, which is a kind of body fat and reduces the risk of coronary disease.

They Fight Free-Radical Damage Leading To Cancers

Another health benefit of macadamia comes from their high flavonoid content. Flavonoids, which are found naturally in these plants help to prevent cells from damage and protects from environmental toxins. These flavonoids convert into antioxidants in our body. These antioxidants search and destroy free radicals and protect our bodies from various diseases and certain types of cancer which include breast, cervical, lung, prostate and stomach cancer.

They Curb Your Appetite!

The fat content of macadamias helps to curb your appetite much longer than a sweet treat. Macadamias are also a source of palmitoleic acid which increases fat metabolism and reduces fat storage – bonus! You only need a few to feel satisfied as a snack, so despite their price, you won’t need many to get a hunger-busting, nutrient-rich fix.

They Strengthen Your Hair, Skin, And Nails

Macadamias are an excellent source of protein, calcium, potassium, dietary fiber and antioxidants. They are also very low in sodium. all of these factors make them a fabulous beauty food, giving your hair and nails a healthy sheen and your skin a nourished glow!

Supports Your Gut Health

That’s right, macadamias contain around 7% dietary fiber, and both the insoluble and soluble types, helping to not only promote satiety, but provide roughage sweeping toxins out of the body, and aiding digestion.

Strengthens Your Bones

Phosphorus and magnesium are abundant in macadamias, and play a variety of roles including bone and teeth mineralization, metabolism, absorption and transportation of nutrients. Calcium also helps in the formation of teeth and bones. Manganese in macadamias also help the body to deposit new bone tissue so that the skeleton stays strong as you age.

They Look After Your Brain And Nervous System

Macadamias contain copper, B1, magnesium, and manganese which helps to make healthy neurotransmitters, the chemicals which our brain cells use to send chemical signals, and nourish the brain. Copper also helps to ensure proper growth of the body, efficient utilization of iron, proper enzymatic reactions, as well as improved health of connective tissues, hair, and eyes!

They’re Lower In Inflammation-Causing Omega-6’s

Consuming too many omega-6 fatty acids in our diet can be a contributing factor to chronic inflammation in the body. Chronic inflammation has been linked to a variety of diseases such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes and other life-threatening conditions. A handful of nuts a day, or a spread of nut butter in your smoothie is a great way to get added protein, fiber, and vitamins and minerals. But most nuts tend to be higher in omega-6 fats than omega-3s, which can tip our body into an inflammatory state if we don’t balance it out with omega-3s from other foods too. Macadamias, on the other hand, are much lower in omega-6s. For example, pecans contain 3.7g per 100g, almonds 3.4g, and cashews 2.2g compared to 0.36g macadamias.

The incidence of heart disease is significantly lower in people who eat nuts regularly (more than five times per week) than in those who eat nuts less than once a week. So why not include some of these nutritious macadamias and start reaping their benefits today!

Macadamia nuts are widely grown in central and upper eastern province in Kenya.

Overtime, the nuts have peaked momentum and they are now among the best selling nuts in the country. At Oxfarm Organic Ltd, we have the modern grafted Macadamia nuts that we sell to our farmers at an affordable price. Book Your Now!!!