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Cultivation of Mangoes in Kenya

The mango industry in Kenya has expanded considerably over recent years, not only in size but also in the geographical location of commercial and homestead plantings. Mango is one of the most important fruit crops in the tropical and subtropical lowlands. It is native to India, Bangladesh, Myanmar and Malaysia, but can be found growing in more than 60 other countries throughout the world.

Also Read: Tips on how to get over 20Kgs/Tree from Tree-tomato farming

Counties Where Mangoes can be grown in Kenya

No longer is commercial mango cultivation restricted to the Coast region, as significant plantings of improved cultivars now also exist in the Makueni county,Meru County, Murang’a County, Nairobi County, Nakuru County, Siaya County, Taita-Taveta County, Tana River County, Tharaka Nithi County, Bungoma County, Kitui County, Embu County, Machakos County, Kiambu County among other regions.

 

Basically, In Kenya 7 out of 8 provinces produce mangoes. But the generally arid eastern region produces 61 per cent of all mangoes, followed by Rift Valley at 30 per cent and Coast, which produces 28 per cent.

 

As a result of this expansion, the mango fruit is becoming more popular with the local population. Despite this increasing popularity, only a few consumers and potential growers are familiar with the characteristics of the many different cultivars of mango that are now grown and available in the country.

 

Varieties of Mangoes Grown in Kenya

These include Apple, Ngowe, Kent, Keitt, Tommy Artkins, Van Dyke, Haden, Sensation, Boribo, Sabine among others. Main characteristics that differentiate varieties are the fruit shape, size, aroma, sweetness, colour, fibre content, taste, seed size and resistance to diseases. Proper selection of a mango cultivar for production has to take into account the following criteria:

  • good adaptation to the local conditions (e.g. rainfall and dry periods)
  • alternation of flowering and fruiting
  • tolerance to pest and disease infections
  • designated use and market requirements

 

The mango is best adapted to a warm tropical monsoon climate with a pronounced dry season (>3 months) followed by rains. However, information from other countries indicates that crops

cultivated for a long time over an extended area show a high degree of diversity due to varied environmental influences

Economic Importance of Mangoes include;

  • Consumed as fresh fruits
  • Source of income
  • Source of foreign exchange
  • Source of employment
  • Combats nutritional disorders

Also Read: How well-planned are you for tree fruit farming this season?

For more information about mangoes farming visit our offices. Also, book your seedlings today!!!

 

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Common challenges to mango production in Kenya

Many farmers in Kenya invest in mango orchards. However, there are a number of production-related hindrances at farm level, including:

Limited access to good quality planting materials

-There is a general shortage of grafted planting materials of improved and higher yielding varieties in many areas. Farmers often use inferior seedlings obtained by germinating mango seeds from indigenous varieties. Such ungrafted trees take much longer to bear fruit. Whereas grafted trees begin to bear fruit within 3 to 4 years, ungrafted trees will take at least 5 years to bear fruit, depending on the growing conditions.

Pest and disease problems

Mangoes have many devastating pests and diseases, which can result in total yield loss. Major pests include the fruit fly (Bactrocera invadens), seed weevil (Sternochetus mangiferae) and mealy bugs (Rastrococcus invadens). Diseases like anthracnose and powdery mildew are common in almost all mango growing areas.

Poor orchard management –

In many areas, mango trees are left to grow so big that pest and disease management, harvesting and other field operations are difficult to implement. Except in big or commercial farms, mango trees are normally scattered around the gardens, ranging from 2 to 100 trees per household. This scattered nature makes mango a commonly neglected crop in terms of management, but becomes important only during the harvesting season.

Also Read: how to grow peaches and nectrines

Post-harvest losses

Fruit damage is a common problem as a result of poor pest and disease management and the poor harvesting practices. Also, a lot of fruit is lost after harvest, especially during the peak seasons due to the limited capacity to store and process fruit. This is further worsened by the poor roads and transport infrastructure to markets.

Limited returns from mango production

Mango is highly seasonal and harvest is only expected at certain times of the year

depending on the local conditions. During this time, most areas are harvesting and so the local markets are saturated and, therefore, offer very low prices, which may not even cover transportation costs.

For more information about mango farming in Kenya, visit our offices. In addition book your seedlings today!!

 

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Mango Farming in Kenya: The best way to do it

Mango Farming in Kenya needs time and patience. Oxfarm grafted mangoes take less time to mature.

Mango Farming in Kenya: Planting

Land should be ready by deep plowing followed by levelling with a mild slope. Spacing varies from 5m x 5m, within the dry zones where growth is in smaller amount, 8m x 8 m, in substantial downfall areas and rich soils where rich vegetative growth happens. New dwarf hybrids like Amrapali is planted at nearer spacing. Holes are stuffed with top soil mixed with 20-25 kilo well rotten mature.

One year previous healthy, straight growing grafted mangoes from Oxfarm is planted at the center of holes in conjunction with the ball of the intact soil throughout season in such a simplest way that the roots aren’t distended and the graft union is on top of the bottom level. Plants should be irrigated forthwith when planting. Within the initial one or 2 years, it’s better to produce some shade to the young plants and additionally stake to create them grow straight.

Mango farming in Kenya: Irrigation

Young plants are more opt for correct institution. Just in case of full-grown up trees, irrigation at ten to fifteen days interval from fruit set to maturity is useful for up yield. However, irrigation isn’t counseled for 2-3 months before flowering because it is probably going to market vegetative growth at the expense of flowering.

Mango Farming in Kenya: bury Cropping

Inter crops like vegetables, legumes, short length and dwarf fruit crops like papaya, guava, peach, shrub, etc. betting on the agro-climatic factors of the region is full-grown. The water and nutrient necessities of the bury crops should be met singly.

 

Mango farming in Kenya: harvest and yield

Mango faming in Kenya

The yield of mango varies greatly, relying upon the variability and agro-climatic conditions prevailing in an exceedingly region. Grafted mango trees begin bearing from the second year onward. However, phanerogam trees might take 5-8 years. At the beginning of bearing at the age of two – three years the yield is also as low as 10-20 fruits (2-3 kg) per tree, rising to 50-75 fruits (10-15 kg) within the succeeding years, and to regarding five hundred fruits (100 kg) in its tenth year. within the age group-20- forty years, a tree bears 1,000-3,000 fruits (200-600 kg) in a year. The productive age of a grafted fruit tree is sometimes 40-50 years, when that the yield declines.

 

Related Content: Why Hass Avocado is the new Cash Crop

 

Mango Farming in Kenya:  Post Harvest Management

 Storage

Shelf life of mangoes being short (2 to three weeks), they should be cooled as soon as they are attained to storage temperature of thirteen degree Celsius. Several varieties will stand up to storage temperature of ten degree Celsius. Steps concerned in post-harvest handling embody preparation, grading, washing, drying, waxing, packing, pre-cooling, palletization and transportation.

Mango Packaging

Mangoes are typically packed in furrowed fiber board boxes 40cm x 30cm x 20cm in size. Fruits are packed in single layer eight to twenty fruits per carton. The boxes should have decent variety of air holes (about V-day of the surface area) to allow sensible ventilation.

Banks in Kenya have additionally developed mango funding schemes in potential spaces for enlargement of area below mango. Individual mango development schemes with farm infrastructure facilities like well, pump set, fencing and drip irrigation system etc. have additionally been thought of.

Contact Oxfarm now and be advised on a way to best grow mangoes. In addition, book your mango seedlings now because the demand for mango seedlings is incredibly high and we would really like all our customers to have the primary priority.

 

Mango tree seedling

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PEST AND DISEASE MANAGEMENT IN MANGO FARMING IN KENYA

In organic farming systems, preventive methods based on proper crop and habitat management are encouraged. Direct methods of control are reserved for emergencies only. Synthetic insecticides and fungicides are not allowed in organic mango production. The most destructive mango pests are the mango seed weevil and the mango fruit fly, common nearly in all mango producing areas.

ants on a mango
  • Mango seed weevil (Sternochetus mangiferae)

Mango seed weevil, also called the mango stone weevil, is one of the major pests of mangoes in sub-Saharan Africa. The larva, which is the damaging stage of the pest, enters the fruit by burrowing through the flesh into the seeds, where it feeds until pupation, destroying the seed. Early attack (when the fruit is forming) leads to premature fruit fall. If the attacks occur at a later stage, fruit infestation is very difficult to detect, since there are no external signs of infestation. When the adult emerges, it tunnels through the flesh, leaving a hole in the fruit skin which may serve as an entry point for secondary fungal infections, greatly affecting the quality of the fruit. This is particularly a problem because, in many instances, weevil attack remains undetected in the field, and is first noticed in storage or when cutting the fruit.

The weevil spreads into clean areas through the movement of infested fruit for propagation or consumption. It can, however, be managed by:

  • Continuous monitoring to ensure timely intervention is important, for instance, a weevil attack can be detected by monitoring for egg-laying marks on young fruit. Regular fruit scouting is important to detect adult activity during fruit growth.
  • Ensuring good orchard sanitation by collecting and destroying all scattered mango seeds and fallen fruit. All collected fruit and seeds should be buried deeply (about 50 cm deep).
  • Ensuring orchard quarantine by restricting movement of fruit from old orchards or areas known to have mango seed weevils to areas where young orchards, free of seed weevil, have been established.
  • Applying sticky bands at the upper end of tree trunks when the trees start flowering to reduce migration of weevils to branches for egg laying.
  • Mango fruit flies (Bactrocera invadens)

Female fruit flies puncture the fruit skin and lay eggs that develop into maggots (larvae) in the flesh of the fruit after hatching. The larvae feed on the fruit and cause it to drop prematurely and destroy the pulp of the fruit. Generally the fruit falls to the ground as, or just before, the maggots pupate. In fruit for export, fruit flies cause indirect losses resulting from quarantine restrictions that are imposed by importing countries to prevent introduction of fruit flies. Nearly all fruit fly species are quarantine pests. Fruit flies attack soft, fleshy fruit of a wide variety of fruit and vegetables. Management strategies of fruit flies include:

  • Continuous monitoring of fruit flies to determine when they arrive in the orchard and to decide when treatment is needed. Monitoring can be done using bait traps like the ‘bucket trap’ (Also see transparency 4-18). The farmer should, however, be able to identify fruit flies from among other trapped insects. Pheromone traps are also available to attract male fruit flies, hence reducing reproducing populations.
  • Orchard sanitation is important as poorly managed or abandoned orchards can result in buildup of fruit fly populations. All fruit with dimples and oozing, clear sap should regularly (e.g. twice a week for the entire season) be removed from the tree as well as all rotten fruit from the ground. The maggots are killed by burning or tying collected fruit in black plastic bags and exposing them to the heat of the sun for some hours. The fruit can also be buried deep, at least 50 cm (about two feet), to prevent emerging adult flies from reaching the soil surface.
  • Several natural enemies can contribute to the suppression of fruit flies. Major natural enemies are parasitic wasps (e.g. Bracon spp.) that attack the maggots of fruit flies and predators such as rove beetles, weaver ants, spiders, and birds and bats. In particular, weaver ants have been shown to be very efficient in protecting fruit trees from pests, including fruit flies. These ants pray on fruit flies, but most importantly, their presence and foraging activity hinders the fruit flies from laying eggs, resulting in reduced fruit fly damage, as shown in mango orchards in Benin. Although natural enemies alone do not give satisfactory control of fruit flies, efforts should be made to protect them, and to complement their effect on fruit flies with other management options. Dill, parsley, yarrow, zinnia, clover, alfalfa, parsley, cosmos, sunflower and marigold are flowering crops that attract the native wasp populations and provide good habitats for them. African Organic Agriculture Training Manual Module 09 Crops Unit 22 Mango 11 ­ ­ Mango fruit fly damage.
Mango rose flower beetle.
  • Biopesticides such as a spray pyrethrum solution is effective in controlling fruit flies. Other plant extracts like neem, garlic, chilli and tephrosia can also be used. The biopesticides can also kill beneficial insects like bees if they are sprayed directly. Therefore, it is best to spray in the evenings after most of the bees are back in their hives (after 6 pm).
  • Bagging prevents fruit flies from laying eggs on the fruit (See also transparency 4-19). In addition, the bag provides physical protection from mechanical injuries (scars and scratches). Although laborious, it is cheap, safe and gives a more reliable estimate of the projected harvest. Bagging not only protects fruit from fruit fly damage, but protects the fruit from physical damage improving the market appearance of the fruit. However, it is only practicable on small trees. Other common pests of mangoes include scales, mealy bugs, aphids and mango flies.
  • Scales suck the plant sap. Feeding by scales may cause yellowing of leaves followed by leaf drop, poor growth, dieback of branches, fruit drop and blemishes on fruit. Heavily infested young trees may die. In addition, soft scales excrete honeydew, causing growth of sooty mould. In heavy infestations, fruit and leaves are heavily coated with sooty mould, turning black.
  • Mealy bugs (Rastrococcus invadens) suck sap from the leaves, branches, flowers and fruit. They excrete honeydew that develops into black sooty mould.
  • Whiteflies and Blackflies (Aleurocanthus woglumi) can also be regulated through the beneficial insects. They suck sap from leaves and may weaken the plants when numbers are high. They excrete large amount of honeydew where sooty mould develops. High numbers of these insects can almost blacken trees, reducing photosynthesis and may cause leaf drop. >
  • Mango Aphids (Toxoptera odinae) live in clusters sucking sap on the underside of young leaves, on petioles, young branches and fruit. Their feeding causes slight rolling, or twisting of the leaf midrib. Sooty mould growing on honeydew produced by the aphids may cover leaves, twigs and fruit, reducing its market value.

These are all sucking insects that live on leaves, young branches and buds and can cause great damage. However, all of them have natural enemies such as lady beetle larva, wasps, spiders and parasitic fungi. Therefore, improving diversity, by planting wild flower strips in the orchard and hedge rows, will enhance the beneficial insects. By wrapping a smooth, slippery plastic band around the trunk or any sticky substance will also restrict the movement of the mobile pests. In case of heavy infestation it is possible to control by spraying a 1 % soap solution with 1 % pure alcohol, with an application of paraffin oil (white oil) as a 3 % water emulsion or with a plant extract of neem or other botanicals.

Most diseases of mango are caused by either fungi or bacteria. The first preventive measure is, therefore, to obtain healthy vegetative propagation material free of these infections.

  • Anthracnose is caused by the fungus Collectrichum gloeosporioides and is the most common disease of mango, especially in regions that have high rainfall and heavy dews. It affects leaves, stems and floral panicle, but the fruit receive the most damage. The fungus causes brown spots on leaves and black spots on fruit and flowers and makes the young branches brittle. The infestation can be reduced if dead material (branches, leaves and infested fruit) is removed from the orchard. After harvest, anthracnose can be controlled if the fruit is given a water bath for 3 to 5 minutes at 55° C.
  • Bacterial infection with Erwinia spp. can infect the stem, branches, flowers and young fruit. The symptoms are similar to the spots on the fruit and leaves as in anthracnose. These bacteria can survive in the soil. When it rains, the bacteria spores get under the leaves and fruit through rain splash (when soil particles get pushed into the air on contact with raindrops). Cover crops reduce rain splash, thus reducing the infestation of the leaves and fruit. An active and living soil can also reduce bacterial multiplication because Erwinia spp. does not explosively propagate in soil.

  • Powdery mildew (Oidium mangiferae) can damage young fruit and flowers. This fungus appears mostly in warm, humid weather (temperature of 22° C and relative humidity of 65 %). In severe attacks, the entire blossom panicle may be involved and fruit fail to set (affecting yields). An open, well-ventilated and faster drying orchard that is regularly pruned hinders the mildew infestation.
  • Leaf spot disease (Cercospora mangiferae) – causes spots on leaves and fruit. An open, well-ventilated and well-drained orchard is the best preventive measure against Cercospora infestation. Infested fruit is not marketable.
    leaf mango spot

    African Organic Agriculture Training Manual Module 09 Crops Unit 22 Mango 13 ­ ­ ­ ­ Handling mangoes for marketing of fresh fruit Discussion on postharvest handling Inquire among the farmers how they commonly utilize mangoes. Do they sell to the fresh fruit market, dry the fruit or produce pulp or juice? Discuss for all uses what the best harvest time is and how postharvest handling is best managed. In acute cases, mildew, anthracnose and leaf spot diseases can be regulated with sulphur or copper preparations, which are allowed in organic farming. However, in case of certified organic mango production, the farmers should consult their certification body for guidance before applying any of those preparations.

 

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New Mango breeds promise fortune for farmers

More than 500 farmers in Kilifi and Malindi are growing five new commercial mango breeds with yield potential of 10 times conventional varieties. The new drive is aimed at taking the returns from local mango farming to new highs. Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (Kari) has brought in five new mango varieties from Florida, in the US.
The varieties include Haden, Tommy Atkins, Van Dyke, Sensation and Kent. They yield between 1,000 to 1,200 fruits per tree. The move will increase yields for farmers who were previously growing conventional mango varieties like Ngoe, Boribo and Apple, which yield at most 200 fruits per tree.
“The coastal area was chosen for the roll-out of the new breeds because of its endemic poverty levels and the economic impact the project would have there,” said Kari assistant director of horticulture and industrial crops Lusike Wasilwa. Kari has also developed dwarf varieties for the coastal region — Peach and Sabre, to add to the other five varieties. The dwarf varieties have been developed by grafting superior varieties onto local varieties that do well in the coast to produce high yielding varieties.
Value addition Farmers are also being taught value addition to their crops through post harvest methods to preserve their fruits. The shelf life of a picked ripe mango is two weeks, but farmers can preserve peeled mangoes in sugar saline solution for up to three months. This “stops farmers from panic selling at throwaway prices,” said Wasilwa.
“In Kenya, industrial and small scale processors process four of the 10 mango products processed worldwide, confining processing to juices, pickles, Indian chutney and jams. Yet all the 10 products, which include mango paste, puree, pulp and powder, can be processed locally, said Wasilwa.
Next year, Kari aims to help farmers process mango powder for selling. Currently, farmers sell a kilo for Sh5 to Sh20 season. Yet if these are solar dried and packaged, a pack can sell for between Sh120 and Sh150 in supermarkets. Farmers at the Coast sell half a kilo of locally processed jam for Sh100.
Read more at: Standard digital
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Mango varieties in kenya

Francis

Francis has a deliciously spicy and sweet taste. The flesh has fibers but is very soft and juicy. Francis is Bright yellow in color with green overtones and flaunts an elongated and sigmoid S-shape. Owing to the fibrous flesh, Francis may not be a popular choice for salads, but it finds great use in chutneys due to its tangy flavor.

 

 

 

Glenn

Glenn is an excellent choice among various varieties of mango. It has a sweet, silky and peachy flavor and an exotic odor which make it popular among mango lovers. Glenn mangoes are a little red or pink in color and oval to oblong in shape.

 

 

 

Kent Mangoe

The Kent mangos feature a sweet and delicious taste which is further enhanced by their juicy flesh which has a limited number of fibers. Due to their texture and flavor, Kent mangos are ideal for juicing and drying and also find uses in baking (they make for a great mango bread recipe!). Kent mangos are dark green having a dark red blush over a small portion of the fruit. The fruit itself is large and oval in shape.

 

 

 

Madame Francique

also known as “Dessert Mango” owing to its great use in desserts. This variety features varying colors from light green to orange to slightly yellow. Madame Francique is known for its rich, sweet and spicy taste which is rare and tangy but exceptionally brilliant.

 

 

 

 

Ataulfo

The vibrant yellow Ataulfo with a sweet and creamy flavor is every mango lover’s absolute favorite. Ataulfo has smooth, firm flesh with no fibers making it easier to use in salads or just consume on its own. This kind of mango is small and oval in shape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tommy Atkins

They have a mildly sweet flavor with firm, stringy and fibrous flesh. Tommy Atkins have different shades going on their medium to large oval bodies. The most prominent of them is the dark red blush which covers most of the fruit.

 

 

 

Valencia Pride

A child variety originating from Haden mangos, the Valencia Pride also finds its roots in Florida. First reported Valencia Pride fruit was produced in 1941. This variety is large and the skin is covered with a large red blush while some yellow hues also find their way around it. Valencia Pride is a fibreless variety and has a smooth, melting, juicy texture along with a mouthwatering odor which makes it a premium choice.

 

 

Keitt

It is enjoyed both when fully ripe and green and also as pickles when not fully grown. Keitt mangos have a sweet and fruity flavor with firm, juicy flesh having only a limited amount of fibers. Keitt mangos are dark to medium green often with a pink blush over a small portion of the mango. The keitt mangos are vast and oval in shape.

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Surprising Benefits of Mangoes

When you savor delicious and succulent mangoes every season, you probably don’t think about the immense health benefits coming with every bite. A common nickname for mangoes is actually ‘the king of fruits’. Beyond the sweet, luscious taste of mangoes, they also contain an abundance of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that assure your optimum health.

For decades, mangoes have been used to soothe stomachs. Similar to papayas, they contain certain enzymes with stomach comforting properties. As the popularity of mangoes has spread, many food manufacturers have introduced jellies, jams, squash, pickles, marinades and spices that include pure mango flavor.

Mango is rich in fiber, so if you have at least one mango every day in your diet, you are almost guaranteed to prevent constipation, piles and symptoms of a spastic colon. Research and studies published at Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety have demonstrated that dietary fiber has a positive effect on eliminating degenerative diseases, including certain cancers and heart conditions. Now you have even more reasons to include this delicious fruit in your daily diet. The more you participate in strenuous activities,the more bodily potassium you lose, which is yet another helpful side effect of mangoes – high potassium content!

Nutritional Value of Mangoes

Mangoes belong to the same family as that of pistachios, gandaria, mombin and cashews. Some common names for mango are mangot, manga, and mangou, depending on the region or nation. It originated in southern Asia, more specifically in Burma and eastern India, almost 4,000 years ago. Many stories in Indian mythology include the mention of the mango plant, and Lord Buddha is said to have often meditated in a mango grove. Mango cultivation first spread to Malaysia, eastern Asia and eastern Africa and was finally introduced to California around 1880. They were introduced to Africa and Brazil by Portuguese explorers, while mango cultivation started in Hawaii and Florida around the 19th century.

According to Indian beliefs, mangoes symbolize life (it is the national fruit of India) and is used in almost every sacred ritual. Mango leaves are almost always used for festivals and wedding decorations. ‘Chutney’ made from Indian mangoes is the original chutney and has become universally popular. Today, India remains the world’s major producer of mangoes, but Thailand, China, Brazil and Mexico also cultivate this highly beneficial fruit.

Health Benefits of Mangoes

Mangoes are very low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. They are also an excellent source of dietary fiber and vitamin B6, as well as a good source of vitamin A and vitamin C. They are rich in minerals like potassium, magnesium and copper, and they are one of the best sources of quercetin, betacarotene, and astragalin. These powerful antioxidants have the power to neutralize free radicals throughout the body. Ailments like heart disease, premature aging, cancer and degenerative diseases are due to these free radicals that damage the cells.

In China, mangoes are sweet and sour and offer a cooling sensation. The tonic made from mangoes in Chinese herbal medicine is known as yin tonic, and it is used to treat bleeding gums, anemia, cough, constipation, nausea, fever, sea sickness and as a cure for weak digestion.

MangoesKeeps Blood Pressure Under Control

Mangoes have an impressive vitamin content that assures overall health. They are rich in potassium (4% in 156 mg) and magnesium (2% in 9 mg), and mangoes are great natural remedies for high blood pressure patients. They also contain selenium, calcium, iron and phosphorus. They are said to be vitamin powerhouses as they are rich in riboflavin, vitamin B6, vitamin A,vitamin C,vitamin E,vitamin K, niacin, folate, thiamin and panthothenic acid. These components help you to avoid a host of diseases that can come from deficiencies of these vitamins and minerals. The vitamin E content in mangoes can even help to boost your sex life by triggering the activity of your sex hormones.

Cancer Prevention and Heart Health

Related Post: Why Hass Avocado is the new Cash Crop

Mangoes have high amounts of pectin, a soluble dietary fiber that efficiently contributes to lower cholesterol levels in the blood. Pectin can also help prevent you from developing prostate cancer. Recently, studies at The Institute for Food Research discovered that a compound within pectin combines with galectin 3 (a protein playing significant role in all the stages of cancer). The European Prospective Investigation of Cancer also has come up with a strong association between eating mango and lowering the risk of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract.

Weight Gain

Mango consumption is one of the easiest ways to gain weight. 150g of mango has around 86 calories, which can be absorbed easily by the body. Moreover, they contain starch, which transforms into sugar that aids in gaining weight. Some people work hard to put on weight for a variety of reasons, and mango should definitely be a part of their diet. Mango milkshakes will accelerate the process of gaining weight since they also contain milk, and are notoriously delicious!

Aids Digestion

Mangoes play a prominent role in eliminating problems such as indigestion and excess acidity. The digestive enzymes in mangoes help to promote natural, efficient digestion. The bioactive ingredients in mangoes like esters, terpenes and aldehydes contribute in enhancing appetite and also improve the function of the digestive system.

Cures Anemia & Helps in Pregnancy

Mangoes are rich in iron, which makes them beneficial for people suffering from anemia. A regular, moderated intake can help eliminate anemia by increasing the red blood cell count in the body.

Mangoes are also very beneficial for pregnant woman, since the iron requirements during pregnant is extremely essential. Doctors often prescribe iron tablets during pregnancy, but instead of supplementation, you can enjoy a healthy iron-rich diet with juicy mangoes. The taste buds during pregnancy usually lose some of their sensitivity, so mangoes will surely prove to be the delight of your day, for more than just its health benefits.

Cures Acne

Perhaps you are surprised to know that mangoes are closely related to skin health. Other than bringing a healthy glow to your face, they also help to lighten skin color. You can easily enhance your beauty by including this tasty fruit in your diet on a regular basis.

Mangoes effectively treat acne by opening the clogged pores of the skin. Once these pores are opened, acne formation will eventually stop. Unclogging the pores of the skin is the most effective way to eliminate acne. To enjoy this benefit, there is no need to eat them every day; you need to remove the pulp and apply it on the skin for around 10 minutes, then rinse it off.

Slows the Signs of Aging

Mangoes contain high amounts of vitamin A and vitamin C, which both help to produce collagen proteins inside the body. Collagen helps to protect blood vessels and the body’s connective tissues, thereby slowing down the skin’s natural aging process. Therefore, mangoes can rightly be called an anti-aging food. Dietary supplementation is the best way to restore your youth in a natural and delicious way.

Promotes Brain Health

Mangoes have abundant quantities of vitamin B6, which is vital for maintaining and improving the brain’s function. These vitamins aid in the amalgamation of the major neurotransmitters that contributes in determining mood and the modification of sleeping patterns. They naturally provide significant quantities of this vitamin. With mangoes as a part of your diet, you can be assured of a healthy brain and effective nerve functioning. You will also be avoiding medicinal supplements, which have a long list of possible side effects. The Glutamine acid content in mangoes also improves concentration and the power of your memory.

Boosts Body Immunity

As mentioned earlier, similar to carrots, mangoes are rich in beta-carotene, a powerful carotenoid. This element of mango helps in to enhance the immune system of the body and make it impervious to bacteria and toxins. Excess beta-carotene is also transformed into vitamin A inside the body. Vitamin A is another antioxidant vitamin and gives you additional protection against the free radicals that can harm your internal systems. Thus, mangoes are great choice for food items to add into your regular diet. They not only increase your chances of living a disease-free life, but is also a pleasure to eat due to its magnificent taste.

Diabetes Management and Prevention

Further research is still ongoing, but some studies have already revealed that mangoes are a great natural remedy for diabetes. It was a long-told myth that diabetic patients should avoid mangoes because of its sweet taste; now it is being shown that other than the fruit, the mango leaves are also helpful in curing diabetes. Place 10 or 15 mango leaves in warm water and close it with a lid before going to bed. In the morning, drink the water on an empty stomach after filtering the leaves. Regular practice of this method has shown positive results for diabetic patients in the management of their blood sugar levels.

What are Mango Allergies?

It is possible to suffer from mango allergies. Some people can be sensitive to mangoes, since they belong to the Anacardiaceae family and are therefore a distant relative of poison ivy. Mangoes contain a small amount of a substance called urushinol, which is a toxic resin that can cause dermatitis. The severity of this skin allergy varies between individuals. However, the peel and juice of mangoes are more responsible for this allergy, while the flesh of the fruit has a relatively low chance of inducing this allergic reaction.

source: organic facts

 

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Common challenges in mango production in Kenya and Africa

Common challenges in mango production in Africa

Many farmers in Africa invest in mango orchards. However, there are a number of Production related hindrances at farm level that include:

Limited access to good Quality planting materials

  • There is a general short age of grafted planting materials of improved and higher yielding varieties in many areas. Farmers often use inferior seedlings obtained by germinating mango seeds from indigenous varieties. Such ungrafted trees take much longer to bear fruit. Whereas grafted trees begin to bear fruit within 2 to 3 years, ungrafted trees will take at least 5 years to bear fruit, depending on the growing conditions.

Pest and disease problems

  • Mangoes have many devastating pests and diseases, which can result in total yield loss. Major pests include the fruit fly (Bactrocera invadens), seed weevil (Sternochetus mangiferae) and mealy bugs (Rastrococcus invadens). Diseases like anthracnose and powdery mildew are common in almost all mango growing areas

RELATED: How well-planned are you for tree fruit farming this season?

Poor orchard management

  • In many areas, mango trees are left to grow so big that pest and disease management, harvesting and other field operations are difficult to implement. Except in big or commercial farms, mango trees are normally scattered around the gardens, ranging from 2 to 100 trees per household. This scattered nature makes mango a commonly neglected crop in terms of management, but becomes important only during the harvesting season.

Post harvest losses

  • Fruit damage is a common problem as a result of poor pest and disease management and the poor harvesting practices. Also, a lot of fruit is lost after harvest, especially during the peak seasons due to the limited capacity to store and process fruit. This is further worsened by the poor roads and transport infrastructure to markets.

Limited returns from mango production

  • Mango is highly seasonal and harvest is only expected at certain times of the year depending on the local conditions. During this time, most areas are harvesting and so the local markets are saturated and, therefore, offer very low prices, which may not even cover transportation costs.
  • Mango production is becoming a very important economic activity with potential to improve food and income security. Strategies are, therefore, needed to minimize risks associated with mango production and improve the productivity of mango orchards. This chapter, therefore, introduces organic approaches that can contribute to better production conditions of mangoes, and can be adapted to the prevailing local conditions.

We could love to here your thoughts concerning mango farming and challenges encountered at personal level.

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EXPORT OPPOTUNITIES FOR MANGOES

Kenyan mangoes have a ripe market in Japan

As the mango harvesting season approaches, farmers should be looking at export prospects as a way of making better earnings than they have been by selling them locally.Ministry of Agriculture officer Samuel Mburu says the surplus production of mango fruits during peak season of December-March has often been linked with losses on the part of farmers, who fail to select their markets well.

Farmers and vendors often sell their produce at throw-away prices for fear of losses, occasioned by the perishable nature of the fruit, yet they can chop them up and dry them for export.

Mangoes, which on average cost about KSh30, can shed off their price by up to a third to retail at KSh10 in local market, like Nairobi’s Wakulima and Gikomba.

A kilogramme of dry mangoes can fetch between Ksh650-KSh700 in export, according to Mburu. It requires about 6Kg (or  7-10 pieces) of fresh mangoes to make 1kg of dry chips.

“Japan and China are ready markets for dried mango chips. In fact, this market is stable all year round and can ensure regular earnings for farmers,” he said.

East African Growers and Keitt Exporter Ltd, among other companies, buy, package and exports this fruit and many more others on behalf of farmers.

Stratregy

Off-season production (June–August), can let farmers enjoy high local prices because the markets are usually not saturated around this time.

“But export produce must be of high quality,” Mburu, who is based in Machakos County told Farmbiz Africa.

Mr. Mburu advises farmers to select the pesticides they use wisely and also ensure that their produce are protected from diseases.

“Farmers lose between 30 per cent and 40 per cent of their produce to pesticides and diseases. Even if not all fruits are affected directly, quality is not guaranteed.”

“Quality produce starts with growing clean planting materials, and proper pest and disease control,” he said.

To look out for

Anthraxnose is one of the most common diseases that affect mangoes, and Mburu recommends planting of less susceptible varieties such as Tommy Atkins, Madoe, Keitt, Vandyke, Matthias, Sabine and Sabre.

Cutting and properly disposing affected parts of the plant can save on a great deal besides regular pesticide spraying.

For Mango management practices and seedlings contact us

 

Source: farmbizAfrica.com

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Starting a mango orchard Kenya

Its now easy to start a mango orchard both for commercial and for consumption. With only sh 40,000, we will make your dream come true in your one acre land. This includes the cost of seedlings,planting and three months monitoring. We also do replace all the seedlings that are not thriving well. All varieties of mango seedlings are available including tommy, Kent and Apple. You can also buy the seedlings from us and do the planting yourself. Each seedling at sh 150. We ship across the country at a small fee.Visit our offices at Hermes building ,Tom mboya opposite KTDA or click here to contact us.