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What you need to know to start a hatchery business

Getting live chick from eggs has been made simple with the innovation of hatchery and despite the fact that working a hatchery, brooding eggs and dealing with the incubation needs some level of aptitude and specialized know-how, egg hatchery business is one that can be done easily with little supervision.

Points to note:

  • Fertilized eggs ought to be gathered from the hen three times each day based on the production framework that is placed.
  • To disinfect the eggs before setting, keep up the privilege barometrical condition amid incubation. Also, test run the hatchery before you set eggs inside. it’s imperative to permit the satisfactory escape of Co2 from the hatchery and;
  • Put the hatchery far from wells and light eggs logically.
  • disinfect hatchery before setting

There are various things required before delving into business, but here, we will be discussing only the most critical aspects.

The Incubation Process

A procedure called incubation is the basic system whereby treated eggs are hatched into chicks. Incubation is the procedure by which prepared eggs are given ideal states of temperature, relative dampness and ventilation essential for the improvement of chicks and their effective hatching.

Since you have now come to terms with the meaning of incubation, it is also imperative to understand that there are two kinds of incubation and they are the natural incubation and Artificial incubation respectively.

The natural incubation entails:

  • Incubation is independent of anyone else after the hen may have laid a few eggs up to 15.
  • The hen gets broody and stops laying.
  • The hen sits on the eggs and gives the required climatic condition, heat, for an effective incubation of the eggs in twenty-one days.

The artificial incubation entails:

  • It utilizes man-made gadget called INCUBATOR, which gives the ideal conditions under a logical framework for the advancement of egg hatchery to chicks.

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Steps to Start an Egg Hatchery Business

Beginning a poultry hatchery is a profitable venture to take to in Kenya. However, it’s imperative to plan out the business in detail before you begin. Here are some pieces of information to enhance your startup procedure:

  1. Get A Business Plan

The business plan eliminates the mystery of business failure, protecting your poultry hatchery from the likelihood of basic oversights. A poultry business plan coordinate with different applications will help you to streamline the procedure, functionality and prospects of your business much further.

  1. Research Your Competitors

Sometime before you open a poultry hatchery in your vicinity, it’s a smart thought to perceive how you will fit in the prospective business environment. It’s always good to “look around” and see what is already on the ground. This will help you to discover competitors close to you. Simply enter your proposed business environment to get a rundown of poultry incubation facilities and businesses in your locality.

Search for Poultry Hatcheries near You. Is the nearby, prevailing market sufficiently huge enough to accommodate another poultry hatchery? If not, it is advised to make certain adjustments, perhaps change location or devise a means of fitting in.

  1. Follow a Well-Guided Master-plan

Develop a hatchery business master plan such that treated eggs are kept for a time of 21 days, and they are then hatched to day-old chicks. The day-old chicks are then sold to poultry farmers and others in the Agro-allied industries.

Generally, the first port of call is to prepare a storage where eggs laid are stored. The eggs are later moved to hatcheries where they will be hatched in 21 days. It is ethical and also helpful to make provision for good health practices in your eggs hatchery business to forestall future contingencies.

As touching finance, your egg hatchery business can be financed by the Agricultural bank, Bank of Industry and Business banks if where you are able to convince them to support your enterprise.

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  1. Network With People Who Are Already in The Hatchery Business

If you are keen on beginning a poultry hatchery business, it’s a savvy move to network with some person who has been in the business for a considerable number of years. Debunk the idea that every competitor is a threat. It’s not always so. Besides, many experienced business people appreciate offering guidance to start-up business visionaries like yourself. If you are tenacious, you can discover a business coach who will bail you out.

The significant position of this stage provides for artificial incubation where a hen doesn’t necessarily have to sit on eggs for 21 days. With the use of the technology available in artificial incubation process, a large number of eggs can be hatched after the stipulated time-frame, within minutes. Today, we have hatcheries with the capacity of more than 100,000 eggs hatchery limit per day.

If you are looking to start hatchery business and you are in need of poultry equipment’s, don’t hesitate, contact us and we will help you out.

 

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Reasons Why You Should Start an Agribusiness in Kenya Today

When most people think of agriculture in Kenya, images of poor and overworked farmers with crude tools on a rural farm readily come to mind. Many, especially young Kenyans, still think that agribusiness is a poor man’s occupation. In Butere Mumias, Tetu, Nyeri, Mavoloni, Machakos or even in Ololunga Narok county everybody wants a white-collar office job in Nairobi city. Agribusiness is hardly on anyone’s mind.

Did you know that Kenya sits on an agribusiness goldmine but most people just don’t see it? If you’re one of the blind, allow me to open your eyes with a few exciting facts you need to know about agribusiness in Kenya. Did you know that since 2009, investors in the USA, Europe, Middle East and Asia have been buying and leasing millions of hectares of Kenyan land for agricultural purposes? Many people may not know it but there’s a trend of serious land grabbing by foreign interests for Kenyan land.

Did you know that Foreign Direct Investment in Kenyan agribusiness was $10 billion in 2010 and is projected to reach $45 billion by 2020? Agriculture is taking a huge leap in Kenya and investors want a piece of the action too. Did you know that Kenya’s agribusiness industry will be worth $1 trillion by 2030! That’s huge! If this projection by the UN comes true, agribusiness will become the ‘new oil’ in Kenya!

In the light of all these facts, how come the rich and wealthy folks are investing in Kenya’s agribusiness industry while the majority of Kenyans are largely ignorant about the amazing potentials of agriculture? Below are five reasons why agribusiness is the biggest opportunity right now in Kenya.

Kenya Has Rich And Abundant Agricultural Land

Agribusiness is key in achieving food security in Kenya
Hass avocado at Mkulima Wa Nyeri Farm

Sub-Saharan Africa according to world bank has almost 50% of the world’s fertile and uncultivated land. The size: over 200 million hectares! This is why the continent is now widely considered to be the future breadbasket of the world. It is this huge abundance of land resources that gives Kenya the strategic potential to feed the world!

Most of Kenya’s agricultural land lies in the tropical rain forest belt, which receives a favorable amount of rainfall and sunlight all year round. As a direct consequence, more than 80 percent of food crops consumed across the world can be produced in Kenya.

Interestingly, a large proportion of Kenya’s agricultural land is located in the rural areas. That’s why they’re often cheap to buy or lease. On the average, one hectare of land (10,000sqm) can be leased for as low as Ksh100 per year (depending on the location). This makes it one of the best land bargains you can find anywhere in the world!

Read: Should I quit my job and start farming?

Kenya Has A Ready Market And High Demand For Agricultural Produce

Agribusiness is key
people must feed everyday! think Agribusiness

Agribusiness is one of the best business opportunities in the world because food never goes out of fashion. People must eat food everyday!

Currently, Kenya’s population is just over 45 million people. At its current growth rate, the country’s population is expected to reach 100 million by 2050. Now and in the future, Kenya will always have a lot of mouths to feed.

Kenya currently spends billions of dollars every year to import grains, flour and all kinds of finished and semi-finished foods which it can produce locally. There is a huge opportunity for entrepreneurs who can provide cheaper and locally-grown alternatives to the food that Kenya imports.

It’s not just the food industry that depends on agribusiness. Several other industries, especially the manufacturing and processing industries, depend on agribusiness for a wide range of raw materials. As Kenya’s economy continue to grow, the demand for raw materials will surely increase and create more interesting opportunities for agribusiness on the continent.

Read: Why you should have a working business plan for you to succeed in commercial maize farming

 Improved Varieties Are Changing The Perceptions

Agribusiness in Kenya has suffered through the years because of its poor yields and crude farm practices. Most of the crops cultivated in Kenya  are very little and are often very prone to pests, diseases and drought. As a result, most Kenyan farmers used to work very hard but have very little to show for all their hard work during harvest time.

However, due to advances in crop/animal science and technology, it is now possible to harvest more food per hectare than ever before in Kenya’s history. There are now improved crop and animal varieties that mature earlier, require less resources, and are less susceptible to pest attacks, diseases and drought. Across Kenya, these improved varieties are increasing yields by as much as 400 percent! For example hass avocados, grafted tree tomatoes.

There are now improved and locally-adapted varieties of maize, cassava, millet, rice, sorghum, beans, sweet potato, cowpea, groundnut, soybean, pigeon pea, banana, durum wheat, and bread wheat.

There are also several local and international organisations that are focused on supporting Kenyan farmers with improved seedlings and support.

Agribusiness Is Very Ascendable. Start With What You Have!

Whether you own one plot of land or 10,000 hectares, agribusiness is one of few business opportunities that allow you to start on any scale, with whatever you have!

Entrepreneurs like Mkulima WA Nyeri started his agribusiness in 2015 in his backyard with just four 500 tree tomato trees. Today, he owns a 3-acre tree tomato farm and fruit nurseries and he is a major supplier to a company in Mega, Nyeri County.

The opportunity to start small means that people with little capital can become part of Kenya’s multi-billion-dollar agribusiness industry. Because of the guaranteed demand for agricultural produce, that small vegetable or poultry farm in your backyard could just become a huge business tomorrow.

Every evidence shows that you don’t have to be a wealthy investor with millions of shillings in the bank or a highly-educated person to start a business in agriculture in Kenya. You can start where you are and use what you have, and grow from there. You can start your agribusiness journey in your home backyard or do it on a part-time basis with your day job. It’s very flexible that way!

Read: How Many Years Will It Take To Get Returns On Invested Capital Under Hass Avocado Farming

Agribusiness Is a Huge Job Creator in Kenya

Agribusiness is one of the most effective ways to create jobs and empower millions of Kenyans. At present, up to 60 per cent of the labor force in Kenya is employed in the agribusiness industry. Agribusiness remains a top employer of labor in many Kenyan counties.

The value chain in the agribusiness industry, from food production, processing and marketing provide huge opportunities for employment and entrepreneurship. So, if you’re looking to start a business or invest in an industry that makes a significant social impact, provides jobs and creates sustainable wealth, agribusiness is surely the way to go!

Read: Passion Fruits prices rise due to low production

Interested in Kenyan Agribusiness? Here’s a top tip!

If you’re excited about the potentials of agribusiness in Kenya and would like to explore it much further, we have just the right resource for you! Just head over to our offices and you’ll learn about several ideas, opportunities and success stories that will surely amaze you.

Kenya is changing. You need to be a part of this big dream that’s finally coming true!

 

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Citrus Fruit farming in Kenya: What you should Know

Growing citrus is a long-term investment, so it’s a good idea to be informed before undertaking this type of farming. These plants are large shrubs or small to moderate-sized trees, reaching 5–15 m tall, with spiny shoots and alternately arranged evergreen leaves. They Include;

  • Limes,
  • Sour & sweet oranges,
  • Lemons,
  • Grapefruits,
  • Tangarines

Ecological Requirements

The growth, development and production of citrus plant depends on the physical characteristics of the soil such as drainage, water-holding capacity, structure, soil depth, and the degree to which water can infiltrate the soil, among others. These characteristics however differ in the various soil types.

  • Citrus can be grown in a wide range of soil types. However, for best results, they should be grown in well-drained soils, which are fertile, well-aerated and with a pH of between 6-6.5.
  • Citrus trees should be planted in a sunny and wind-protected area, and in frost-free regions because they cannot tolerate severe frosts.
  • They can tolerate high temperatures provided the trees are well supplied with soil moisture.
  • Well-distributed annual rainfall of not less than 1000 mm is needed for fair crop.

Read: How to grow Williams Hybrid Banana

Planting

  • Clear the field and dig planting holes 60 x 60 x 60 cm well before the onset of rains.
  • At transplanting use well-rotted manure with topsoil.
  • Spacing varies widely, depending on elevation, rootstock and variety. Generally, trees need a wider spacing at sea level than those transplanted at higher altitudes. Usually the plant density varies from 150 to 500 trees per ha, which means distances of 4 x 5 m (limes and lemons), 5 x 6 m (oranges, grapefruits and mandarins) or 7 x 8 m (oranges, grapefruits and mandarins). In some countries citrus is planted in hedge rows.
  • It is very important to ensure that seedlings are not transplanted too deep.
  • After transplanting, the seedlings ought to be at the same height or preferably, somewhat higher than in the nursery.
  • Under no circumstances must the graft union ever be in contact with the soil or with mulching material if used.

Read: Pests and Diseases control in capscum farming

Maturity/Harvest

  • Upon Planting, Citrus matures and starts producing fruits after 3 years.
  • Depending on the climate, citrus fruits may take 6 to 8 months to ripen.
  • Citrus fruits will not ripen off the tree, so refrain from picking them too early.
  • The best indicator of ripeness is taste.
  • Harvest the fruit by cutting them off with pruning shears or by pulling the fruit stalk from the tree

 

 

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Macadamia nuts farming: How to get most returns

Despite macadamia nut tree being a money-making harvest, several farmers don’t receive most returns, attributable to errors of omission and commission.

Though a mature tree will produce between 80kg and 100kg of nuts, most farmers harvest between 30kg and 50kg, and incur needless production prices. Failure to induce most effort is attributed to errors of omission and commission.

According to Oxfarm, an acre of land will hold to 70 Macadamia trees. This could earn a farmer, going by the present government set minimal returns of Ksh70 per kilogram of nuts, up to Ksh 500,000 – 800,000 per acre if a farmer harvest 80Kg per tree, depending on farming practices and favorable climate. At the a harvest, that comes from 2-3 years after transplantation of seedlings, a farmer will fetch between 30kg and 50kg, on 6-8th year reckoning on the range and the attention given to the trees. Production will increase with each harvest.

Due to high competition for the macadamia nuts by process and selling companies; most companies supply improved costs to farmers. This year, some firms offered the maximum amount as Ksh200 per kilogram of nuts, however external market factors forced the costs to drop to a mean of Ksh130 per kilogram.

Macadamia nuts will grow in most areas of the country, however production can vary depending on the number of precipitation, where farmers don’t have any access to irrigation water.

It is vital to consult experts on best varieties for given regions. The well-liked selection is Murang’a 20. It’s hardy and adapts well to completely different climates, with improved production throughout the year. Different varieties manufacture doubly a year.

Macadamia Nuts Farming: Propagation

Where farmers have gotten 50kg and fewer, it implies that there’s a drag typically beginning with propagation of the seed, to the eye and care given to the tree.

Propagation needs plenty of monitoring and doing the proper issue at the proper time, as well as watering and spacing. One should even be trained to confirm that one will differentiate between types of macadamia nuts by looking on them before planting and at the young stage, to making sure that there’s no mistake once marketing the seedlings to farmers.

Ratios of the propagation media, as well as soil, sand and compost manure, are key among different technicalities that decisions for coaching.

Related Post: Farmers already earning more from Macadamia nuts and hass Avocados

Macadamia nuts farming: Timing

Right from the nursery, correct records should be kept. Transplant the seedlings once the plant has 2 full leaves and a bud, whereas guaranteeing that they’re properly uprooted, handled and transported to wherever they’ll be planted in the polyethylene bag.

 

Macadamia nuts farming: Spacing

The recommended spacing is ten by ten meters, that adds up to seventy trees per acre. Congesting the trees affects nuts production, because the branches can meet, so denying them enough sunlight and different needed conditions for flowering and nuts production.

 

Macadamia nuts farming: Management

Macadamia tree
Macadamia tree in Muranga

 

The other mistake that farmers create is to abandon their trees after planting. The trees need weeding, particularly once young. Their shades cannot suppress weeds. Apply manure a minimum of once a year, as robust healthy trees can guarantee you the simplest quality and amount. Use caution with pruning. Do it in a slanting manner, using pruning scissors. Don’t use a machete.

 

Macadamia nuts farming: pests and disease management

The tree is disease-resistant. Some farmers use chemicals to manage pests and insects. That is wrong. Management them using smoke. Light a fire about 2 meters away from the stem, guaranteeing that it’s not large enough to get into the leaves. We recommend pepper and similar robust smoke producing weeds. The bitter smoke can penetrate throughout the macadamia tree and effectively manage pests and insects.

 

Macadamia nuts farming: Harvesting and storage

Many farmers and processors encounter immense losses attributable to poor gathering and post-harvest handling. generally, losses quantity to over ninety per cent. Don’t harvest premature macadamia nuts. Collect them from the ground and deliver them to the market as shortly as possible to avoid touching their quality Storing at home for long can compromise quality.

The nuts can develop molds, just as they do when harvested immature. Harvest and post-harvest are very crucial stages. When harvested, nuts should be stored in raised sisal bags and not polythene bags. Place the sacks on well-laid out timber planks to that ensure they do get into contact with water.

 

Macadamia has a bright future in Kenya, despite the challenges facing the sector. Book your seedlings today.

 

Macadamia seedlings

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Kiwi-Fruit Farming: New Money Maker for Farmers

A kiwi-fruit costs more than KSh 100 in Kenyan supermarkets today. Have you ever asked yourself why Kiwi-Fruit is that expensive?

Kiwi-fruit as we have said in our earlier posts is an amazing fruit with amazing benefits. A customer who had eaten Kiwi-fruit in U.S.A visited our offices earlier last week seeking to know where he could get seedlings. He told Oxfarm that he has never eaten a fruit that is so delicious and with so much benefits like a Kiwi-fruit. His worry was why Kenyans are still importing Kiwi-fruits while they can grow it in their homes.

Where to Grow Kiwi-Fruits

Kiwi-Fruit
Kiwi-fruit Farming

Kiwi is a temperate fruit that can do well in the temperate regions of Kenya like, Western, Central, Rift Valley, Upper eastern and Many other places. It’s also hardy and can tolerate extreme cold and extreme hot temperatures but being favored by warm climates.

Kiwi-fruit is known to do extremely well in almost any soil but it prefers well-drained that has a PH of 5.0-6.5. Kiwi-fruit does not need much fertilizer and as Oxfarm we discourage use of fertilizers since exposure to a lot of fertilizer results to burning of the roots, therefore, you simply need to use compost manure.

Due to its shallow rooted nature, it requires frequent irrigation for maximum yield. This property also helps the tree to absorb water fast in areas with little rainfall hence surviving such climate.

Commercial Kiwifruit farming in Kenya

Kiwi-Fruit Marketability

As I had said earlier, Kiwi-fruit is very expensive in Kenya. This is so because the demand is higher than the supply. Although Kiwi fruit is a new thing in Kenya, people have embraced it and the market is not shy as well.

As we have continued to preach the kiwi-fruit gospel; its benefits and farming methods, people have heard us and although a few farmers have started planting and selling the fruit, more people are demanding it. The average kiwi vine takes 2- 4 years to mature and start producing fruits.

The first few harvests may however not be as productive but this tends to improve throughout the plants mature life. Once you taste it, you will need to taste again. However, its yet to pick on commercial scale. This gives you an opportunity as a farmer and a business man. Take the advantage of the low supply and the high demand, plant more supply more and reap big.

 

What to Invest in Kiwi-Fruit Farming

At Oxfarm, we are known to have almost all kinds of tree fruits seedlings. We have looked at you as a farmer and we have made it possible for you to have Kiwi-fruit seedlings at an affordable price of KSh 400.  We will also take you through kiwi-fruit management practices. Basically, all what you need is a land, seedlings, enough compost manure, trellis (same as those used in passion fruit farming).

Returns to Expect in Kiwi-Fruit Farming

Approximately, one acre of Kiwi-fruits carries about 650 vines. The first few years as we said might not be as productive but the third – fourth year ought to produce around 20 fruits per vine. The current market price for a kiwi-fruit is more than a 100 but let’s use KSh 50 as selling plice to the market.

Related Content: Hass avocado farming: Suitable Counties

Note! The production increases with time and you might get as many as 50 fruits per vine. What are you waiting for? Contact Oxfarm. We will be glad to assist you make money.