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End of year Kenyan Farm Tour and Training – Kenran Dairy – 12th December 2018

omigo magera farm

Theme: How to run and manage a modern day dairy farm on a small piece of land.

The farm that started with 6 dairy cows in 2016 is to day the hub of 85 dairy cows comprising high yielders, low yielders, in-calf heifers, and unweaned heifers housed in different sections of the unit depending on age and development stage. Utilizing modern innovation technology in milking and preservation, Kenran Dairy is one of the most technological advanced farm in Kenya today.

*From the high investment in computerised milking machines, to the high standards of hygiene practiced by the farmhands; everything spells Europe-style class here.*

The cows here listen to slow jam & classic music, undergoes pedicure, shaving to keep them clean and sleeps on cow mattress to ensure comfort hence more milk production.

 

Related: 6th Mushroom Training – Bannie-El Mushroom Farm in Limuru – 24th November 2018

 

That is what best describes former South Mugirango MP Omingo Magara’s farm tucked deep inside Ongata Rongai. His one-acre farm is an example of how to run a modern-day dairy unit.

One of the biggest headaches for large-scale dairy farmers is safe milk preservation and boosting their milk yields while maintaining their profit margins. Because majority of them lack affordable milk preservation equipment and machines, some end up using dubious methods to achieve this goal.

The farm, having partnered with EuroDairy supplies innovative dairy equipment’s such as coolers and milking machines from Muller — a farm equipment company in Netherlands. Hon Magara also runs a fully stocked state of the art facility that stocks modern dairy farming equipment’s, spare parts and general cow comfort such as cow brushes, cow shaving machines, hoof cutters, cow magnets and detergents for washing milking machines, all which are key to boost milk production

Expect to learn on the following

• Dairy farming as a business
• Production and herd structure
• Housing
• Spacing
• Animal health
• Calf rearing/young stock management
• Feeds/feeding management
• Groupings and requirements (lactating, dry cows, calves and heifers)
• Cow comfort and efficiency
• Herd management
• Adoption of technology
• Socio-economic management
• Staff management
• Challenges

 

Payment Details
Farmers Trend
Mpesa Till Number 201677
Then send confirmation details to +254 706 222 888

Charges per head 4,000/=

Inclusive of transport from Nairobi, writing materials and meals

 

 

More Details about the farm. Omingo Magara The Dairy Farmer

 

MORE PHOTOS OF THE FARM

 

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Basic Characteristics of an agri-preneur

Agribusiness is important to global food supplies and developing economies. However, getting agricultural products from re-mote rural areas into larger markets has its challenges. These include a lack of intermediaries to develop relations between vendors, purchasers and contract systems. Other problems include inconsistent product quality and supply of products because of poor infrastructure. There is also competition in domestic markets from transnationals that can sell their products for less than domestic producers can. This is where an agri-preneur comes in; sees a problem and thinks of a solution.

What is agri-preneurship?

Agri-preneurship is a key factor for the survival of small-scale farming in an ever-changing and increasingly complex global economy. But what is agri-preneurship? How does it relate to small-scale farmers who operate on the edges of the economy?

Agri-preneurship is one way in which small-size farmers can confront issues such as under-employment and need for new jobs. Opportunities exist for farmers to create value-added agricultural products that are sold in local markets. For example, Oxfarm adds value to tree-tomato fruits to make juice and jam. Rural agri-preneurs can compete against larger corporations through a business cluster that controls significant quantities of local farm products.

Agri-preneurship motivations are important in understanding how the agri-preneur operates their business or defines success. Traditionally, the definition of an agri-preneur is an individual who starts a new business, cognizant of associated risks and ambiguities, for profit and growth. The agri-preneur takes advantage of opportunities and gathers resources, usually money, and other necessary non-monetary resources to turn their ideas into reality. Motivation for agri-preneurship, its meaning and measures of success differ among people, as well as countries, and by income level.

In addition, agri-agri-preneurship is tied to personal identity. Each agri-preneur seeks to legitimize their identity through business activities and thus their goals reflect the environment and social norms. For example, an agri-preneur in a developing country may view success as the ability to support oneself and one’s family. In contrast, another agri-agri-preneur may be competitive, seeking to be the largest and best in order to reach their goal to be a profitable self-supporting business, independent of others.

Read: How to make Silage for your Dairy Cows in Kenya

Agri-preneurship dynamics

Successful agri-prenuers in Kenya are highly knowledgeable, contacts with various people, innovates and adopts improved practices in agribusiness. However, there are many challenges that these farmers face: social barriers, economic barriers, regulations, access to finance and information, and their own managerial capacity to cope with risks and changes and to seize opportunities.

 Characteristics of an agri-preneur

  • An agricultural agri-preneur should be able to think purposefully in terms of farm activities. This is perhaps, the hardest task most farm agri-preneurs face. Most of the farm people find it easy to do, to act, to perform. Most farm people have difficulty, however, in thinking clearly about farm development. An Agricultural agri-preneur must be able to think.
  • An agri-preneur should be able to express himself clearly. The best conceived idea is worthless, unless it can be communicated. An Agricultural agri-preneur must communicate to farm laborer effectively.
  • An, agri-preneur in the farm sector must possess competence in farm operations. This does not mean that he must be a technician. But rather, he should possess the technical competence necessary in his field to enable him to manage the farm effectively.
  • Farm entrepreneur should possess the ability to think broadly. He should be able to see the overall, not miss the forest because of the tree. Broad comprehension is necessary so that he can see the effect of each proposed action on the whole of the farm activities.
  • An agri-preneur must know the actions and reactions of different farm people engaged by him in his farm or in the hired farm which he is managing, and he should have the tact, intelligence, foresight, etc., to channelize such actions and reactions for greater interest of farm activities in which he is engaged.
  • Agri-preneurs must take appropriate decisions with regard to farm activities from its very first stage till the last stage and he should know how to coordinate various stages of farm operations so that new result is encouraging.
  • He should know how to get various facilities extended by the government, semi-government and: other departments, institutions and organizations in time and in right quantity. This is a quality he must have to have for being successful in his farm activities.
  • He should also be able to think how his land can be used in the best possible way through multiple-cropping or double cropping and to make proper arrangements so that he gets maximum prices for his farm products. Production and marketing of farm products should be well coordinated.
  • He should be able to maintain daily records of the …..costs including depreciation costs of his farm activities and should make all possible efforts to reduce costs to the minimum and to have maximum return after selling his farm products. There should be a detailed costs and revenue accounts of his farm.
  • He should be able to think the feasibility of starting an agro-industrial activity to supplement his farm income. He should also see how he can earn more through subsidiary occupations.
  • He should work in such a way that he can minimize jealousy, rivalry etc. Among his neighbors so that his farm operations are least disturbed.
  • He should be tactful enough to avoid political pressure, if any, to influence his farm decisions.
  • He should foresee vested interests to disturb his farm activities beforehand so that he can take appropriate steps at the right time to minimize such influences, if any.
  • He should be dynamic. This is a trait that is characteristic of leaders and is essentially needed in a changing economy. This trait is a desire to move ahead, to change, to break new trails, to do bigger and better things. It is not an obvious personality trait. It is not a high-pressure personality. In fact, it may not even show on the surface. But it is desirable and usually spells the difference between passive agri-preneur and dynamic agri-preneur.
  • He should possess skill in human relations in the farm sector and have insight into human motivation and behavior, this enables him to lead, not drive, his farm workers.

Read: Ksh 2000 for an Apple? Here are the most expensive fruits in the world

In the process of farming the farm agri-preneur will require to decide on the best size of his enterprise, the storage facilities needed, and the amount of credit required to implement the production plan. Similarly, the methods for land preparation, planting, weeding, irrigation, fertilization of land, controlling pests and diseases, harvesting, threshing and cleaning of produce need to be decided in advance. Decisions on all these issues are vital as they very much influence the productivity of an individual farm. Nevertheless, a serious obstacle is to be found in the shape of imparting appropriate training, to farmers in order to make them capable of taking decisions of various types, so that the farmer of tomorrow may also become a good agri-preneur.

 

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How to quit your job, move to your farm and start making sane money

Forget the well-paid 8-to-5 job, two bedroom house and the other trappings of material wealth. Sure, it’s nice to have them, but we farmers know that real wealth is clean air, clear water and healthy nutritious food, not piling up stuff and then dying with it.

We want to spend our days outside, tending our gardens and food forests, spending more time with our families. We want the freedom and security of a farm and take care of our needs, bring abundant vitality back to the landscape, and earn a living wage from our efforts to “make the Earth great again”.

It’s a modest dream, isn’t it? In a world of greedy banking elites, deceitful and self-serving politicians and daily environmental destruction, it’s a simple ideal that deserves to come true, and yet you can’t help but wonde..Can this dream come true for you?

Do you really have what it takes to be a farmer, or that’s just an escapist fantasy? Is it realistic to expect that you can make a living wage from your farm and quit your job, or is it just the pipe dream that everyone ‘normal’, including your spouse, thinks it is?

Well, we are here to tell you that it doesn’t have to be just a dream. Actually, in contrast to what you might have been told, it’s quite a reasonable expectation.

There is a way to turn your dream into a productive reality, but the truth is you’ll have to be strategic about it and learn a little bit about business and entrepreneurship.

Having a hobby vs. running a business

The moment you decide to use your land to generate some income for you, you’re no longer just a hobby farmer playing. At that moment, you also become an entrepreneur, and your farm becomes a small business. Farming today is essentially entrepreneurship and this means that you’ll be putting extra hours to make this work. I’ve never seen anyone starting a sustainable and profitable farm business without the time investment. Also, there’s the chance of failure, almost at every step of the way. You can invest all that time and money, try and fail miserably because you made a fatal mistake.

In other words, it’s exactly like starting a business. Exactly. Can you succeed as a farmer entrepreneur? Sure, there are many people doing it, some of them crushing it and that’s why many people are attracted to making a living from the farm, because it can be done. But you can also waste all that time for nothing and lose everything you invested in.

Process for Starting A Successful Farm Business

 Know Yourself and Identify Your Strengths, Passions And Interests

Most people are not evenly gifted, even as farmers within producing plants or animals, that’s why you tend to see farms that gravitate towards plants and farms that gravitate towards animals. And that’s why generally you don’t see expertness on both of those things even among the farmers.

Think about this for a second, what kind of person are you; are you an animal, plant, technical or people person? Not everything will come naturally to you, and not all elements of permaculture will interest you to the same extent, nor will you have the same levels of skills and strengths in all areas of your new professional life.

You might be a people person, with teaching and education as your thing, or you might be a technical person who just loves earthworks and can’t stop talking about machinery – you get the picture, right? Whatever it’s, discover your natural inclinations and your unique skill-set.

Select Your “Industry” Based on Your Strengths And Passions

Now, based on your initial assessment, decide what would be the best path for you. Not everything in farming has the same appeal to everyone, and not everything comes down to being simply a farmer, you have many options from which to choose.

To sum up, in essence you can choose to be a farmer (the most obvious option), a secondary producer of value-added products , do marketing and distribution (basically selling the fresh produce or value added products), provide services related to your farm or farming (ecotourism, basic healthcare…), develop a nursery, i.e. plant propagation and animal breeding (everyone needs plants), teaching and education on the site (and online as well), or consulting – designing and implementing designs.

As this suggests, there are many ways to win at this permaculture game and, once you now know what interests you, comes naturally to you, and what your strengths are, you’ve definitely minimized the chances of doing something that, ultimately, won’t work out for you.

Research Your Local Market and Identify What People Want

When you’re starting a farm business, ideally you want to find something that is at the intersection of your passion/strengths and what people want to buy. Once you’ve determined the first part of that equation, your next step should be to research your local market to learn more about your potential customers and their needs/desires.

I’m going to simplify the process here and say that the market research in this stage boils down to analyzing what type of people live in your local area (demographics – young students, retirees, or…), what the culture of the area is like (what do people value – local artisan products, nutritious food or perhaps they couldn’t care less), what is their purchasing power (is the local economy booming and people have the extra income to spend on quality produce, products and services?) and their purchasing habits.

This research doesn’t have to be complex or extensive, in the beginning just develop the habit of putting your market research hat on when you visit different places (especially your competitors) and looking at who are the customers, what’s the demand like for certain products, what sells well and why, how are they marketing and selling their produce/product/service.

For example, if you want to start a nursery, make sure you visit one and see what people are buying. If a certain type of tree is selling like crazy, then this is a good indicator that there is a demand for more than what’s being produced. You could be potentially filling that hole, (see what I did there?), so dig deeper.

Read: I Have Been a Good Farmer Why Aren’t I Successful Yet?

Produce A Minimum Viable Product and Learn About Business

Once your research has shown that there is a need for a certain produce, product or service, it’s now time to test the waters and produce something of your own.

At this stage, I suggest you hang on to your old job and start something small on the side. I really don’t recommend simply handing in your notice and figuring it out later; you wouldn’t want to jump off a cliff without a parachute and then try to figure out how to make one on the way down. Instead, use your secure job and security to learn new skills and start to develop something on the side.

You don’t have to worry about all the details of running a successful business just yet, diving in too deep when starting out can result in analysis paralysis and, as a budding entrepreneur, momentum is important. So, start small and as a sideline – this can be one nursery bed, one garden bed, one room to rent, one value-added product…

The point is that all these small activities will require some prior learning and, most importantly, are scaleable, think about them as small modules or small business units.

Read: I don’t have capital to start my agribusiness venture how do I start from scratch?

Develop Deep Domain Expertise and Scale Up

Okay, so let’s recap what you’ve done thus far: you’ve found your permaculture career path based on your passions, interests and strengths, you’ve done the market research that’s helped you pinpoint exactly what people want and like to buy (a produce, product or a service) and you’ve successfully created your first MVP, which proved that people will want to buy from you.

You haven’t invested that much time and/or money, yet in the process you’ve learned about business and what it means to be entrepreneurial.

As you can see, you don’t have to wait for that perfect, day when you’ll suddenly have more space, land and time to start that big business that will replace your day job and you’ll live happily ever after. You want to test the waters first and take a few calculated risks. Being risk-averse is a good thing, especially if you’re the breadwinner in your family.

Now you can start to take that one small test module that has produced your MVP and scale it up. For our nursery example, this could be to two, four, six or eight buckets, a further nursery bed, or to a more professional setup. You’re not attempting anything new, rather you’re simply doing more of the same, just on a bigger scale.

As you scale up and produce more products or provide more services they become better with every new iteration as you start to learn more about the entire business cycle.

Because you now know that you’re onto something, you have extra confidence to put in the time and effort to develop the necessary expertise in your domain.

Stack Other Enterprises and Develop Multiple Income Streams

Once you’ve mastered that first initial business unit or enterprise and it generates some continuous profit, you can start thinking about all the other business opportunities on your farm. First, you need to focus on just that one aspect and getting it off the ground, but once you have it running efficiently, you can use the profits to expand your field of operations and stack other enterprises.

If you’ve have had a close look at the sources of incomes of successful permaculture farms, you can clearly see that every single one of them has multiple income streams. That’s because it’s hard to make a living by doing one thing; the reality is that in today’s world no one venture alone can keep the farm afloat.

You should always ensure multiple income streams. In this way you become more resilient and, if one falls apart, each business unit will prop up the others (some years one unit will carry the others, while at other times, other units will be successful). Eventually, all of these will help keep you securely anchored to the land, close to your family and the abundance you’ve created.

Look for other business opportunities on your farm and use existing profits to start developing and stacking other enterprises.

Whatever Your Dream Is, Get Started Now

Starting a successful permaculture farm business is not easy, and realistically there is a high chance you’ll fail, but here’s the deal… If you really want to come closer to living off the land, you must be willing to actively get yourself in the game, making mistakes, learning from them and then moving on, wiser and stronger.

Whatever your dream is – get started now. Don’t wait for that perfect, never to be seen, moment when you’ll have more land, the optimal financial situation, more experience. As we’ve learned, you can start small, on the side, with just one small module and, if it works, then scale up. You can start your journey as a hobby, but to be able to make a living from something, it has to be more than just that. You can start out that way, but ultimately you’ve got to turn it into something more.

Read: How youth you can succeed in farming

As with everything you try for the first time, at first it’s going to be a bad version of what you want to be. Accept this, because, in the beginning, the right mentality and momentum are more important than perfection. That imperfect and modest version of what you is still better than where you’re currently at if your life feels drab, soulless and unfulfilling.

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I Have Been a Good Farmer Why Aren’t I Successful Yet?

Farming in Kenya is not as easy as people think. If you listen to the media today, you will hear of many successful stories, well don’t be confused if you are an aspiring farmer and think that you can generate fat incomes overnight. Many farmers have lost hope and gave up on farming because of such stories.

We all at one time reached that point where it seems like going forward is impossible. When you’re already overwhelmed, it’s easy to talk yourself into giving up on farming. However, giving up too soon could cause you to miss out on success. Hang in there you never know how soon you might start seeing progress and profits. Give it a little more time. Below are a few reasons that might help you keep on farming.

Read: What Is the Difference Between Agriculture And Agribusiness?

Farming Takes Time

If you hear successful stories on media, chances are that farmers in Kenya have done it before and it’s not their first agribusiness venture. Most successful farmers in Kenya whom I know are people who have tried, failed, tried, failed, and tried again and eventually succeeded. They didn’t call each iteration a failure. They called it a way to improve, because each test, each trial, gave them new information which influenced and improved the next model. Not getting it right the first time, or the 100th time, is not a sign that you should quit. It’s simply a way for you to keep learning how to do it better next time.

There is nothing like Instant success

We’ve all heard stories of the overnight rise to richness. But the truth is that what looks like an instant or overnight success is always preceded by years of struggle and work. There’s a long, hard road to success, but when success hits we only focus on the last mile or so. It looks so easy, and makes for such a great story, that we ignore the miles and miles of obscurity, difficulty, and perseverance required to get to that hill top of glory. Those stories make us feel that if we haven’t achieved a high level of success in a matter of days or months, we must be doing something wrong. And we are: we’re listening to make-believe stories as if they were guidelines to how life works.

The most valuable things Takes Time

People and especially Kenyans like easy, comfortable, familiar things. That’s because we tend to be lazy, and we don’t want to put forth the effort required to do difficult things. Because we shirk from the effort, we go to great lengths to convince ourselves that we don’t need that goal… whatever it is. We pretend that we’re satisfied with the easy things, but we know the truth. The best things, the things that matter most, are the most difficult.

Read: I don’t have capital to start my agribusiness venture how do I start from scratch?

Try the right thing

If you’re trying and failing, perhaps you just haven’t tried the right thing, crop or activity yet. Don’t judge yourself and quit on life and on your goals because you’ve failed in one area, or even several. Every time you try and fail, you learn something about yourself, about life, and you gain experience that can help you to do better next time. So press on. Try something different, and don’t let past failure keep you from future success.

Persistence matters more
If you feel like you aren’t good enough, or talented enough, remember this: there are plenty of supremely talented people out there working at dead-end jobs, not using their talents. Talent is great, but without tenacity, talent won’t get you very far.

I know, I know: the overnight success stories. Right. But there’s a backstory to those, remember? And the backstory is the tenacity that kept that talented person pushing forward, long before success “hit.” Success doesn’t hit, or happen. Success is something you reach by hard work and determination. So hang in there, and stay tenacious.

Your past does not determine your future

For you to succeed, your desire for success should be greater than your fear of failure. Many great successes were once known as big, sad, sorry failures. Every amazing entrepreneur was once a shaky little start-up. Every great farm was once a small plot. And 99.9 percent of the time, their first attempts were not their best. But they didn’t quit. They pushed through one bad draft after another, one business flop after another, until they learned enough and tried enough that they succeeded. Each failure teaches you. Each attempt can give you valuable insight into how to do better next time.

No one is doomed to repeat what didn’t work in the past. It’s a gift in disguise; a gift to look back and learn the mistakes from your past. You never know, the past might be the thing that will guarantee you your future.

Success is coming, just hang in there! Don’t Quit Farming!

 

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What Is the Difference Between Agriculture And Agribusiness?

Agriculture involves the cultivation of crops and the raising of livestock for food, the most basic of human needs. The first ecologists, farmers, understood the interaction of soil, water, grasses and trees; they understood the need to work with nature to produce sufficiency or abundance, and to try to avert scarcity in times of drought or pestilence. Agriculture dictated the survival and development of societies, and security in food allowed the growth of modern industrial states.

In today’s interdependent and technological world of global markets and distribution systems, agriculture has become an essential element of national and international economies. Food is a commodity for trade, and food security is a matter of global concern. The future security of the world’s food supply has focused international discussion on one over-arching question: Can agricultural systems meet the demands of a rising world population and expanded expectations on the one hand, and deal with the deterioration of land and soil resources on the other?

Read: How youth you can succeed in farming

Many scientists today believe that modern agricultural practices, which have increased efficiency and production to an extent unknown in history, now appear to be exhausting the agricultural ecosystem. A movement towards more sustainable agricultural practices has begun. On the other hand, agribusinesses point to new science and technology based on genetic engineering and other methods that may revolutionize the food industry.

Kenya, rich in resources, has always been a major exporter of food. Kenyans, like other societies, have seen farmlands and farm communities as part of their environmental heritage, national identity and culture. But in today’s world of supermarkets, fast foods and freezer containers, where food is available to all who can afford it, many urbanized Kenyans have lost the connection between the food they eat and the land that produces it, not recognizing the profound changes that agribusiness has brought to farming communities, the farming way of life and the environment.

In recent years, concerns about pesticide use, biotechnology and other issues have focused public attention on the quality and safety of food and industrial farming techniques, and spurred interest in alternatives. Resolving issues regarding the sustainability of Kenyan agriculture will involve a new recognition of the integrity of nature and ecosystems and the wisdom of farming methods in harmony with the local environment, while at the same time utilizing the best national and international science and technology to maintain food security levels and meet the challenge of rising populations and deteriorating land and soil resources.

Read: Should I quit my job and start farming?

Players of Agribusiness in Kenya

From Sugarcane farming in the western region to tea farming in the Western Kenya region, livestock keeping in northern Kenya, maize farming in the north rift and fishing in the Indian Ocean, smallholder producers face more or less the same hurdles to wealth creation. The good news is that opportunities exist to make farming, including the small-scale types, a profitable venture for anyone. One of the ways of bringing shine to the much-neglected sector is by adopting sustainable agribusiness.

Agribusiness is a broad area and covers the entire spectrum of food production with multiple players along the value chain. It includes farming, the supply of various inputs, distribution, processing, wholesale and retail sales, research and development, marketing and financing as well as the end product: the food on the plate of the consumer.

The key players in the value chain include the farmers, co-operatives, regulators, government agencies, research institutions, companies, business associations, financial institutions, multilateral bodies, civil society, and the academia.

Sustainable agriculture is not singularly fixated on the profit motive. It considers the socio-economic, environmental and cultural impacts of various activities along the value chain. It supports the local economy through knowledge transfer, job creation, supporting local enterprises and ensuring food safety and security.

The academia can play a crucial role in promoting sustainable agribusiness through carrying out research on new ways of doing agriculture such as better and eco-friendly ways of increasing the soil fertility, increasing animal produce, among other things.

There are various businesses that do a lot with regard to promoting sustainable and inclusive agriculture. There is also a need for improvement in infrastructure, climate change mitigation and adaptation, research and extension, value addition and skills upgrading.

As long as funding remains limited or is diverted by officials, farming will remain unattractive and farmers will continue to suffer in spite of their toil. Lack of trust across the value chain is another issue with many farmers perceiving middlemen as exploiters. The other key aspect is the imbalance of trade between Kenya and its trading partners. Take for instance, coffee and tea which are grossly under-priced with farmers barely meeting the cost of their investment.

Yet the same commodities fetch better prices once they leave the farmers’ hands. The widespread failure to add value to farmers’ produce denies producers the opportunity to earn the true value of their produce. It also denies local entrepreneurs and budding industrialists the opportunity to grow new lines of business and create jobs for many jobless Kenyans. Value addition requires policy intervention through a favorable tax regime, lower cost of power, improved infrastructure and government commitment to find markets outside its borders.

Read: I don’t have capital to start my agribusiness venture how do I start from scratch?

Kenyan farmers and especially the youths are urged to indulge in farming and more specifically agribusiness. Do it for fun and money!

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I don’t have capital to start my agribusiness venture how do I start from scratch?

Starting an Agribusiness in Kenya with no capital is one of the most difficult and frustrating thing. The Kenyan government on paper has placed many avenues that are meant to help the youth in farming but they rarely work. In most cases you will apply only to realize much of your time has been wasted but nothing of value has come out of it. This normally leaves most of the youth frustrated and hopeless with nowhere to turn to for funding. So what can one do in order to start agribusiness without capital or with little capital?

  1. Start Small

We always urge people to start small. By so doing you will be able to use the little resources you have to start small and grow naturally. After a while, you will look back and thank God and time for what you will have become. In addition, you will have build-up enough experience that will help you to even come up with custom made solutions to help you with farm problems.

  1. Grow what you know

We advise you not to venture into farming practices that you are not well familiar with. Always ensure you have done your research well and you have all the knowledge and skills at your disposal. This will enhance your chances of success in the agribusiness you want to venture into. In addition, it will reduce the outside help that may have increased the expenses into the agribusiness. In most cases, having the knowledge and experience in a certain farming venture is all it needs to succeed.

  1. Market your Agribusiness

Spread the word to your family, friends, colleagues and anybody you know about your new agribusiness. Send e-mails, call and make your new business known in all your social media platforms. Your family and friends are the first priorities and they might help you spread the word. This method of marketing can help you to introduce your agribusiness to a much greater audience. When it comes to harvesting, your contacts will have the information of what is coming their way. This means that when a friend or a contact hears anybody asking for a product that you produce, they will just give your contacts.

  1. Avoid too much expenses

When you start your farm in Kenya, you are going to have plenty of expenses, and there are some that just can’t be avoided. What you can avoid though is overspending. For example if you want to plant Cabbages and you do not have money to buy the expensive hybrid seeds, why don’t you instead buy the normal seeds and save the money. By doing this you will have enabled yourself to spread out your money and buy other farm implements that will be required during the growing period e.g. insecticides, fungicides and D.A.P. Being frugal in the beginning can be the difference between success and a failed agribusiness.

  1. Work Hard

 Hard work is an absolute necessity, but when you are starting an agribusiness venture in Kenya with little to no capital then you must be prepared to dedicate everything you have into making the farming business a success. This might mean planting and taking care of the crops yourself, handling marketing, dealing with billing and accounting, and every other working part of your business. You will wear many hats and it will require the majority of your time and energy if you are to make it.

Agribusiness is not hard neither is it simple. It requires patience and dedication. Stay focused, try and do agribusiness that doesn’t require much money but keep your eyes on the ball.

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How to Be Smart in The World of Agribusiness

Agribusiness can provide jobs for young people and help Kenya achieve development goals. Progress in this arena, however, remains limited.

This future can be realized through making agriculture both profitable and “cool” for young people. If you are a young man living in rural areas you must have experienced several barriers, one of which is lack of information on current agricultural technologies and agri-business. To overcome this barrier, attend training programs that link you to climate-smart agricultural practices and profitable new agribusinesses.

Youth can be involved in a number of agricultural activities, including production, post-harvest handling, distribution and marketing of agricultural products. Removing barriers to start-up capital will allow young people to innovate and expand current agri-businesses. By so doing Kenya an the world in general can solve the issues of poverty and hunger.

The majority of Kenya’s smallholder farmers rely on traditional weather knowledge for agricultural activities. This knowledge, however, cannot keep pace with rapid weather changes affecting precipitation patterns and temperatures. Without access to accurate and accessible weather information, farmers, especially the youth, face declining agricultural productivity and increased hunger. As a smart agribusiness investor, start by accessing modern weather and climate data. Profitable agri-businesses under a changing climate can create decent and competitive employment opportunities for the youth.
Technology and the internet are probably the first things that come to mind when you think about the future of work for young people; not agriculture or farming. This makes historic sense, as agriculture sheds labor when countries develop. And the traditional ways of producing food do not look particularly cool. Yet, technology and the internet are also opening up opportunities for agriculture, and urbanization and changing diets are calling for new ways to process, market and consume our foods.

Read Alos: 10 Biggest Agricultural Venture That Guarantee More Money in Your Pocket

The future of jobs in agriculture

While the majority of youth expresses to see its future outside agriculture, many good job opportunities on and off the farm remain in agriculture. The challenge is to make the agricultural sector and its up and downstream activities competitive through innovation, public investment in supportive rural public goods and services, and secondary town development to make them sufficiently attractive to young and older farmers alike. This remains a largely unfinished agenda, one which is equally important to reach the twin goals of eradicating extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity.

Read Also: 5 Things to Consider When Thinking of Starting a Fish Production

Kenya’s youth need new climate-smart agricultural technologies (high yielding and more resilient food crops, irrigation and machinery). The youth also need energy, communication and transport infrastructure that links them to lucrative regional and global food markets. Finally, the youth need gender responsive policies that will enable women and girls to access climate services, credit, agricultural inputs and equipment and insurance.

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10 Biggest Agricultural Venture That Guarantee More Money in Your Pocket

Farming in Kenya is picking up in a high speed and the youths haven’t been left out. If you are thinking of the best ways to make money through venturing in agricultural business, we have researched for you some of the best ideas.

To start with, some of these ventures don’t require much capital and the outcome results are somehow average.

  1. Fish Farming

Commercial fish farming business is a lucrative investment that can spin money at any time of the year continuously. With the implementation of modern techniques and having owned space, an entrepreneur can start this business with moderate capital investment.

  1. Piggery

Having a sufficient landholding an entrepreneur can start a piggery business. Among the various livestock species, piggery is most potential source for meat production and pigs are more efficient feed converters after the broiler. The major facility is pig farming requires a small investment in buildings and equipment.

  1. Vegetable Farming

Spinach, lettuce, pumpkin, broccoli, cabbage, and cucumber et al, are all vegetables that are consumed in every part of the globe and can also be cultivated in every part of the world. This goes to show that there is a very large market for vegetables. So, if you are looking towards starting an agricultural crop cultivation business, then one of your options is to go into vegetable farming.

  1. Mushroom Farming

Mushroom farming is one of the most profitable agricultural business ideas for young entrepreneurs, which has a turnaround period of only three weeks. Yes, you heard that right! And, it has huge profit potential with demand for good quality and organic mushrooms being high among restaurant owners as well as households.

  1. Poultry equipment manufacturing

These are usually skilled artisans who construct various equipment needed on the poultry farm – welders, carpenters, electricians etc. You can learn the various specifications needed for the poultry equipment and you are in business.

  1. Chicken and egg distribution business

This basically involves bridging the gap between poultry farmers and the consumer market. It is very lucrative and requires relatively little money to start-up. You can focus only on chicken, eggs or both. You meet poultry farmers, buy their stock and resell them in the market to wholesalers and retailers. It does not need any special skills, only your marketing abilities and a working vehicle.

  1. Fertilizer Distribution Business

If you like the idea of making a profit by helping people work with the soil, you might enjoy being a part of the fertilizer industry by starting fertilizer distribution business. Entrepreneurs can initiate fertilizer distribution business with a proper selection of products from any location. Find suppliers willing to do business at a suitable price in your area. Obtain quality products at a reasonable price from a reliable source. You can go for import also in the case of bulk purchase. In fertilizer distribution business, the source you choose will depend on your start-up budget.

Also Read: Different Types Of Poultry Farming And Their Products

  1. Soil Testing Lab

Soil Testing is agronomically sound, beneficial and environmentally responsive tool used for monitoring the nutrient as well as making precise fertilizer recommendations for various crops and cropping sequences ensuring no damage to the environment. Establishing a soil testing lab is one of an ideal agriculture business ideas in Kenya.

  1. Fodder Farming for Goats and Cows

Fodder is any agricultural foodstuff used specifically to feed domesticated livestock, such as chickens, horses, pigs, cattle and goats. The term refers to food given to animals, rather than the food they forage for themselves.

  1. Agrotourism

You could also offer a whole tourist experience at your farm where people can come visit and maybe even stay as part of a bed and breakfast type of experience.

Also read: Why Hass Avocado is the new Cash Crop

 

These are just but a few, if you are really interested in agricultural business, there are several others that you can start. Start today and you will never regret.

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Management of green house is paramount. Why?

Good greenhouse management is critical for the proficiency and health of the farm. It might appear to be straightforward — put a seed in a tray with soil, include water, and voila, there are youthful plants to transplant into the field. In writing, truly, it’s as simple as that. Be that as it may, ideal air temperature and water delivery are essential for the advancement of seedlings. Additionally, hidden in the air all around us, in the water leaving a hose, and in the ground inside a greenhouse, there are numerous baffling little living things prepared to wreak destruction on youthful plants. The three most imperative nursery management practices are ideal temperature control, consistent air circulation and appropriate moisture delivery.

Optimal Temperature Control

Air and soil temperature are generally known to be critical for seed germination, yet the details for each kind of seed are so extraordinary it can be difficult to oversee. For example, solanums (tomatoes, eggplant, and so forth) require an ideal soil temperature of around 90 degrees while spinach needs an ideal soil temperature of 70 degrees. For tomatoes, if the temperature is too low, the seeds will stay lethargic; for spinach, soil temperature that is too high can cause thermo-lethargy, averting germination.

So how can one deal with the soil temperatures per specific crops? For the most part keeping up the temperature of a nursery in the 70-80 degree range is best for all crops. Appropriate ventilation and air dissemination help keep up that temperature in warm months. Making sure to open the greenhouse before it’s excessively hot and shutting it before it’s cool (to keep the warmth in) are imperative practices. In the winter months, a few people use electric or propane radiators to keep up warm temperatures. In hot atmospheres, shade fabric can be hung over a greenhouse to keep the temperature down if necessary. Overseeing soil temps for various cropss should be done using area particular warming mats to raise the soil temperature or utilizing little shade structures to keep flats cooler on your greenhouse tables.

All together for the greater part of this to work, keep in mind to use quality soil and surrounding air thermometers. On the off chance that assets are accessible, buying a framework that is programmed, where the ventilation is guided straightforwardly into your thermometer, can make life considerably less demanding. Make sure to keep monitoring your greenhouse. Greenhouses are to a great degree fastidious and the slightest changes in sunlight and wind, or technological troubles can leave your greenhouse very dry and seedlings shriveled or dead.

Air Circulation

To help keep up temperature and prevent pests of the insect or fungal kingdoms, proper air flow is urgent. A greenhouse ventilation framework ought to be comprised of low, side-wall and end-wall vents to permit cool air in, and edge vents to enable the hot air to debilitate out. Fans at the end walls and in the edge are essential to circle the air around the greenhouse and in addition make a slight  breeze easily get through the plants, keeping spores and insects from hanging out on small starts. Air circulation is also very vital in relieving abundance moistness in the greenhouse that molds and “damping off” organisms love. “Damping off” living beings are fungal pathogens.

Read: make money through passion fruit farming

Proper Moisture Delivery

Maybe the most imperative piece of germinating a seed is water. For some, reasons, observing the moisture levels of your soil media is critical and the ideal moisture required for germination may not be natural. Seeds require steady moisture to germinate, however they don’t require profound watering. Seeds ought to be watered all the time sufficiently only to keep up a shallow and high moisture content in the upper part of the soil media where the seed lies. Permitting the extremely top soils to dry down once in a while is critical in forestalling soil borne pathogens.

Once the seed has sprouted and developed, it is critical to start incorporating a consistent wet-dry swing in your media to both advance dry season resilience for their opportunity in the field and avert “damping off” organisms from growing. As discussed, “damping off” organisms are fungal pathogens that occupy the soil surface of your seedling flass and trays frequently shaping a green hard covering. These living organisms can influence the stems of seedlings to decay and the plants at last die.

The depth of the watering is also an incredibly important aspect of moisture management practices in the greenhouse. Once the seedlings begin to grow, the deeper their roots are. Incorporating longer and deeper waterings less frequently gives the plants the needed wet-dry swing (especially on the soil surface) but also promotes good root growth and drought tolerance.

Utilizing these ideal practices will give you beautiful seedlings that will have a greater success rate in the field.

Read: Different Types Of Poultry Farming And Their Products

 

 

 

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Benefits of Growing Your Own Fruits

Benefits for you and your family:

  • Fresh and nutritious fruits. Fruits from your own garden are higher in nutrients than the ones that have traveled several thousand miles to get to your grocery store.
  • Having your children assist you in the garden can increase the chance that they will eat more of the fruits and vegetables they have helped to grow.
  • Growing your own fruits can offer you the opportunity to reduce the amount of pesticides that you use in your garden, making them healthier.
  • Growing your own fruits will save your money at the grocery store.
  • Gardening increases physical activity. It is a great way to engage the whole family in physical activity and lets them help to take responsibility for the garden.
  • The fruits grown in your garden will promote health because they are rich in nutrients, especially in phytochemicals, anti-oxidants, vitamin C, vitamin A and folate.
  • Gardening gives you’re a real sense of appreciation when you can see the bounty of your efforts.
  • Growing a garden gives you a new appreciation for nature, when you can have the opportunity to see how things grow.
  • Gardening may stimulate many new interests. You may want to learn more about botany, landscape architecture, photography, nutrition, and farmer’s markets.
  • Gardening gives you the opportunity to give back. If you have an abundant garden, you might give some of your produce to the local soup kitchen or food bank.
  • This can be a great time to create memories with your children, memories that can last a lifetime.
  • Your garden can lead to new skills, and knowledge for you and your family, your child may have a new found interest to become a farmer!

Society and Community

  • Gardens can foster a great sense of community through parent to parent connections, teacher to student or student to student.
  • Schools and community may decide to build a community or school garden. This is a tremendous learning tool for all involved as well a providing a source of nutritious fruits
  • A community/school garden can help to foster and motivate future leaders (e.g., 4-H afterschool programs).
  • Neighborhood Community Gardens beautify landscape, support local farmers, can create a food secure community where residents do not need to rely on vendors to supply fresh produce.

Environment

Tall fruit trees provide shade.

  • You can use less pesticides or use natural pesticides and this will be less contamination to the environment.
  • Produce peels and waste can create a lot of green waste and takes up a lot of space in the garbage can. Recycle them to make your own compost. It is less expensive than buying fertilizers.
  • Turn unsightly lands into attractive landscapes.
  • Get creative. There is a potential to grow an innovative gardens like futuristic horticulture gardens that are very cost-effective and require substantially less space.

If you’ve got a bit of empty space on your farm, growing a fruit tree is a good way to fill it and still get a passive income- beehives are a similar option, but you can surround a grown tree with beehives for kicks.

Investing in more fruit trees will make them more worthwhile, definitely- the combined benefit of many fruits is always going to be more apparently valuable for the time you spend interacting with the tree every few days. Even ignoring the quality level gain of a fruit tree and placing some kegs or preserves jars right next to your trees can boost the profits you’re seeing from your tree without much extra effort, or you could keep them around as a guarantee of some portable energy consumables during a given season.

Start exploring today!! Book seedlings today!