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Tips on how to get over 20Kgs/Tree from Tree-tomato farming

Tree tomato Fruit can be red or yellow; personally, I prefer the tangy red ones. The plants grow from seed to about 2m tall, long and leggy, and only fruit after they have formed several branches, usually after Year 2.

Related Content:The benefits of certified fruit seedlings

To get the most out of your tree tomato:

  • They only live for about 12 years, so always have a few young ones coming on to replace the old ones;
  • Tip cuttings will fruit sooner, and tend to produce a stronger, more compact bush;
  • In coastal and windy areas, it pays to shelter the trees, and cover them during a frost;
  • Don’t put them in your greenhouse; they grow better outside away from whitefly which covers them like snow otherwise;
  • Feed them like a tomato, with plenty of nitrogen and trace elements;
  • Pruning increases fruit size, so in summer trim some of those leggy growing branch ends back by 60cm.

Combine it all and you can harvest up to 20kg per plant – we have had a crate box full off one tree.

Two Deadly Enemies of Your Tree Tomato

Grafted tree tomato fruitsJust like citrus trees, tree-tomato will die if left to dry out, even if for only a day. In eastern areas you will have to irrigate all dry seasons with a drip line or hand water every few days. In the west, if you’re growing outside, your older plants will get through a few days of dry seasons winds but not many. Get the watering can out or you’ll lose your prized tree. Mulch the root zone to keep the moisture in.

Nematodes are tree-tomatoes worst enemy, they survive by feeding directly off the nutrients pumped through tree-tomatoes roots. They form galls that can reach up to an inch wide where they hide and reproduce, causing many symptoms that point to problems in infected plants’ transport systems. Yellowing plants, stunted growth and general decline are early symptoms, but unless your bed is heavily infected with nematodes, a large tree-tomato planting will only show these symptoms in a relative few plants. They typically appear in soils where tree-tomatoes and other root knot nematode host plants have been grown in the last three to five years, and populations increase the longer an area is used. If you suspect your tree-tomatoes plants have nematodes, start by digging up a particularly weak plant. Roots that have a lot of unusual knobby growths are infected with these parasites.

 

 

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Drip irrigation in fruits

Drip irrigation is a micro irrigation method in which the rate of water application is very low and without any pressure. i.e., drop by drop.  Drip irrigation is based on the basic concept of irrigation only the roots zone of crop, rather than the entire land surface on which the crop is grown. Water flows from the emission points through the soil by capillarity and gravity. The soil moisture content of the crop root zone is maintained at near optimum level to facilitate optimum crop growth and production.

Drip irrigation is useful for fruit crops Banana, Grapes, Citrus, Pomegranate, Papaya, Pineapple, Watermelon, Sweet lime, Mango.

Advantages of Drip Irrigation in Fruits

  • Increased yield
  • Early maturity
  • Water saving
  • Fertilizer saving
  • Increased fertilizer use efficiency by crop
  • Energy saving
  • Labor saving
  • Marginal land & undulated land can be irrigated
  • Use of saline water is possible for irrigation
  • Reduced weed growth
  • Less problem of disease and pest
  • Easy intercultural operations

Also Read: Growing Pawpaw in Kenya: Everything you need to Know

Disadvantages of Drip Irrigation

  • High cost: drip irrigation systems are expensive because of their requirements of large quantity of piping & filtration equipment to clean the water.
  • Expense: Initial cost can be more than overhead systems.
  • Waste: The sun can affect the tubes used for drip irrigation, shortening their usable life. Longevity is variable.
  • Clogging: If the water is not properly filtered and the equipment not properly maintained, it can result in clogging.
  • Drip tape causes extra cleanup costs after harvest. You’ll need to plan for drip tape winding, disposal, recycling or reuse.

This method is not suitable for closely planted crops such as wheat

Components of Drip Irrigation System

  • Pumping set: To create a pressure about 2.5 Kg/sq. cm to regulate the amount of water to be supplied.
  • Filter: To filter the water in Order to remove the suspended impurities from water.
  • Main lines: It is a Distribution system in drip irrigation. Rigid PVC and high-density polyethylene pipes are used as main pipes to minimized corrosion and clogging.
  • Pipes of 65 mm diameter and with pressure rating of 4 to 10 kg/sq. cm
  • Sub Main: It is usually connected to the main lines through a control valve assembly. The function of its to distributes water uniformly to a number laterals.
  • Drippers/emitters: It is fitted to a drip irrigation lateral and intended to emit water in the form of drops or continuous flow at emitter rates not exceeding 15 liters/hr.
  • Drippers function as energy dissipated, reducing the inlet pressure head in the lateral, which generally range from 0.3 to 1.5 atmosphere.

Also Read: Why Hass Avocado is the new Cash Crop

Drip irrigation system is an economical and very efficient system of irrigating for fruit crops, vegetables, row crops etc. Drip irrigated crops use less water compared to overhead irrigated crops. Drip irrigation increase yield.

For more information call or visit our offices. Book your seedlings today!!!

 

 

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Plant hass avocado as a retirement plan

Maybe you have always dreamed about retiring when you hit 60—or even before you get at 50. Having a clear focus and a plan to retire early can be empowering. It feels good to have a purpose and a strategy. plant hass avocado today and you will never regret.

Grab this opportunity to think about what “early” and “retirement” mean to you—and set yourself on a path to bring that vision to life. Some successful early retirees who now blog about their experience prefer the term “financial independence” to “retirement”: The essence is that you, and not an employer, get to call the shots on how you spend your days. That might be a pleasant schedule of travel and community service or maybe working as hard as—or harder than—before on a new business venture you’ve always hoped to pursue.

That’s not to say that making an early exit is easy, though. The more ambitious your vision, the more important it is to start saving and planning as soon as possible and the more compromises between your current lifestyle and future goals you’ll likely need to make.

Related Post: The role of an Agronomist

Consider Avocado Farming

Hass Avocado treeHass avocados matures between 2-3 years, have a long-life span of more than 50 years and you are guaranteed of the market for the fruits. Hass avocado is an investment like no other. With only 40, 000 per acre you can be getting a minimum of KSh 500,000 per year. Oxfarm Organic Ltd plant 150 seedlings per acre and each tree can produce over 1000 fruits per year with the current price of KSh 15 per fruit.

Take for example an employee aged 40 years, and earning an average of 50,000 per month. He can plan an early exit today. What many people don’t know is that working for a person is pursuing someone’s dreams. What about your dreams? We all get it, one needs capital to either start a company or a business. But the question we ask people is, how long have your land laid idle? Five, seven, fifteen years? Now do the math, get out of your comfort zone, plant avocados today and have all the freedom you want. With an avocado farm, you can do other things since avocados require minimal maintenance.

Yes, plant fruit trees, hass avocado, and other perennial crops with haste. For those who work in the office day after day, such can be incorporated in the retirement plan. Such a farm can be a comfortable retreat after years of going back and forth to office. As admitted by those traditional monocrop corn farmers, it can raise the market value of a farm and so it can become a sound investment.

Take a loan if you have to, plant hass avocados and we guarantee you, soon you will fire your boss. We are supporters of anyone who grows avocados.

 

Book your seedlings today, prepare early for next season and two three years to come you will laugh all the way to the market. Call us today for more information.

 

 

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Macadamia nuts farming: How to get most returns

Despite macadamia nut tree being a money-making harvest, several farmers don’t receive most returns, attributable to errors of omission and commission.

Though a mature tree will produce between 80kg and 100kg of nuts, most farmers harvest between 30kg and 50kg, and incur needless production prices. Failure to induce most effort is attributed to errors of omission and commission.

According to Oxfarm, an acre of land will hold to 70 Macadamia trees. This could earn a farmer, going by the present government set minimal returns of Ksh70 per kilogram of nuts, up to Ksh 500,000 – 800,000 per acre if a farmer harvest 80Kg per tree, depending on farming practices and favorable climate. At the a harvest, that comes from 2-3 years after transplantation of seedlings, a farmer will fetch between 30kg and 50kg, on 6-8th year reckoning on the range and the attention given to the trees. Production will increase with each harvest.

Due to high competition for the macadamia nuts by process and selling companies; most companies supply improved costs to farmers. This year, some firms offered the maximum amount as Ksh200 per kilogram of nuts, however external market factors forced the costs to drop to a mean of Ksh130 per kilogram.

Macadamia nuts will grow in most areas of the country, however production can vary depending on the number of precipitation, where farmers don’t have any access to irrigation water.

It is vital to consult experts on best varieties for given regions. The well-liked selection is Murang’a 20. It’s hardy and adapts well to completely different climates, with improved production throughout the year. Different varieties manufacture doubly a year.

Macadamia Nuts Farming: Propagation

Where farmers have gotten 50kg and fewer, it implies that there’s a drag typically beginning with propagation of the seed, to the eye and care given to the tree.

Propagation needs plenty of monitoring and doing the proper issue at the proper time, as well as watering and spacing. One should even be trained to confirm that one will differentiate between types of macadamia nuts by looking on them before planting and at the young stage, to making sure that there’s no mistake once marketing the seedlings to farmers.

Ratios of the propagation media, as well as soil, sand and compost manure, are key among different technicalities that decisions for coaching.

Related Post: Farmers already earning more from Macadamia nuts and hass Avocados

Macadamia nuts farming: Timing

Right from the nursery, correct records should be kept. Transplant the seedlings once the plant has 2 full leaves and a bud, whereas guaranteeing that they’re properly uprooted, handled and transported to wherever they’ll be planted in the polyethylene bag.

 

Macadamia nuts farming: Spacing

The recommended spacing is ten by ten meters, that adds up to seventy trees per acre. Congesting the trees affects nuts production, because the branches can meet, so denying them enough sunlight and different needed conditions for flowering and nuts production.

 

Macadamia nuts farming: Management

Macadamia tree
Macadamia tree in Muranga

 

The other mistake that farmers create is to abandon their trees after planting. The trees need weeding, particularly once young. Their shades cannot suppress weeds. Apply manure a minimum of once a year, as robust healthy trees can guarantee you the simplest quality and amount. Use caution with pruning. Do it in a slanting manner, using pruning scissors. Don’t use a machete.

 

Macadamia nuts farming: pests and disease management

The tree is disease-resistant. Some farmers use chemicals to manage pests and insects. That is wrong. Management them using smoke. Light a fire about 2 meters away from the stem, guaranteeing that it’s not large enough to get into the leaves. We recommend pepper and similar robust smoke producing weeds. The bitter smoke can penetrate throughout the macadamia tree and effectively manage pests and insects.

 

Macadamia nuts farming: Harvesting and storage

Many farmers and processors encounter immense losses attributable to poor gathering and post-harvest handling. generally, losses quantity to over ninety per cent. Don’t harvest premature macadamia nuts. Collect them from the ground and deliver them to the market as shortly as possible to avoid touching their quality Storing at home for long can compromise quality.

The nuts can develop molds, just as they do when harvested immature. Harvest and post-harvest are very crucial stages. When harvested, nuts should be stored in raised sisal bags and not polythene bags. Place the sacks on well-laid out timber planks to that ensure they do get into contact with water.

 

Macadamia has a bright future in Kenya, despite the challenges facing the sector. Book your seedlings today.

 

Macadamia seedlings

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Hass Avocado Farming: What Exporters Expect from You

As demand for hass avocado grows regionally and internationally, there’s no short cut for farmers seeking the simplest market and costs. One should twig right as hass avocado farming  it involves varieties, seedlings and fruits, particularly if you are looking for an export market.

It is necessary for a farmer to start out with clean and prime quality planting materials to urge higher yields. The export market needs quality manufacture, that’s why it’s not advisable to shop for seedlings from unqualified sellers.

Hass avocado tree can be irrigated through drip pipes, and water should always be obtainable. For export quality, the tree ought to be planted in five by five meters spacing or there around, in between the areas one will grow weeds or vegetables to manage soil erosion and to draw in useful insects.

Besides, the hass avocado plant would like enough sunlight throughout flowering. Farmers, therefore, should enable light-weight penetration and management of pest and disease. Before planting avocados, one should conduct a feasibility study on the planned farm before investment. You would like to think about water accessibility, the soil characteristic and therefore the prevailing climate conditions.

Related Content: Commercial Kiwifruit farming in Kenya

Kenya’s Advantage Over Different Countries

Kenya presently produces two hundred,000 metric tons (MT) of the fruits p.a. however solely exports sixteen,000MT. Israel, on the opposite hand, produces a hundred,000 metric tons of the fruits however exports sixty per cent of the full.

The United States is presently the foremost dominant marketplace for avocados followed by Europe and therefore the region Asia. The regions are provided by farmers from the geographic area, African nation, Spain, and Israel. Kenya lags in avocado export because of the fruits lack uniformity. Most countries in Europe not settle for the Kenyan avocados because of challenges that farmers will simply avoid, together with fruit form.

How to handle export hass Avocado

packaged hass avocadoAvocado will just grow well all in all areas of the Kenya except the coastal region because of salinity. Export market demands fruits of certain shapes and sizes, options which may solely be achieved through irrigation of the crops. Avocado farmers in Kenya don’t irrigate their farms as a result their fruits lack uniformity, some are too big, others are medium whereas others are smaller than the desired minimum. Customers at the export market like size 12 fruits with dry matter content of twenty-three per cent.

Another challenge with Kenyan Avocado farmers is that they pick their fruits too early, therefore, they take too long to mature. Native Avocado farmers have advantage over their peers in different countries because of Kenyan fruits gain the market at the time when none of the leading producers have avocado fruits.

“If avocado farming in Kenyan is professionally done, then it will be another success rather like flower farming because of its gathering window which fall at the best time for Europe.” one of the exporters notes.

Also read: Farmers already earning more from Macadamia nuts and hass Avocados

 

Don’t wait, book your seedlings today. Visit our offices for guidelines and more information.

 

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WHY YOU SHOULD PLANT AN ORANGE-TREE FRUIT TODAY

Sweet and juicy to taste, orange is one of the most popular fruits in Kenya as well as the world. Belonging to a group of citrus fruits called hesperidium, oranges have more health benefits than one. Here are the top 10 health benefits of the fruit that Kenyans ignore.

  • Boosts your immunity- A single orange can meet more than 100% of your daily requirement of Vitamin C. This vital nutrient helps improve your immunity, keeping you free from diseases and infections. Here are some more immunity boosting foods.
  • Good for your skin- As we grow older, our skin along with other body parts suffers from free radical damage. This process is like how metals rust after exposure to air.  Even though it is inevitable, oranges are packed with antioxidants and Vitamin C which slows down the process and makes you look younger than your age! Besides oranges, you can eat these fruits and vegetables for glowing skin!
  • Great for your eyes- Along with our skin, our eyes too suffer from damage as we grow older. Oranges are rich in nutrients like Vitamin A, Vitamin C and potassium which are great for your eyes. So, if you want your vision to be just as good as it is now, eat an orange every day!
  • Prevents heart disease-One of the reasons why people get heart disease is because their arteries are blocked due to unhealthy lifestyles and consumption of junk food. Oranges have flavonoids like hesperidin which reduces cholesterol and prevents your arteries from getting blocked. This, in turn protects you from heart attack and various other cardiovascular diseases. Alternatively, you could try these 8 natural cholesterol busters.

Also Read: Regaining Kenya’s passion fruit farming

  • Helps in brain development- Folate and folic acid present in oranges promote brain development and keep the vital organ in mint condition. In fact, these nutrients also make orange a healthy fruit for pregnant woman as it prevents the baby from having neurological disorders later.
  • Prevents cancer- Having cancer can be a tough and harrowing experience for both the patient and the caregiver. Research has shown that a compound called D – limonene present in oranges can prevent various types of cancer like lung cancer, breast cancer, skin cancer, etc. Additionally, the antioxidants and Vitamin C help promote the body’s immunity which helps in fighting cancer cells. Here are some food habits to keep cancer at bay.

  • Keeps you free from stomach ulcers-Oranges are a very good source of fiber which helps keep your stomach and intestines healthy. A diet rich in fiber will ensure that you are not affected with ailments like stomach ulcers and constipation.
  • Protects your vision-Oranges also contain very good levels of vitamin A, and other flavonoid antioxidants such as alpha and beta-carotenes, beta-cryptoxanthin, zea-xanthin and lutein. These compounds are known to have antioxidant properties. Vitamin A is also required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision. Consumption of natural fruits rich in flavonoids helps the body to protect from lung and oral cavity cancers.
  • Great for diabetics-People who have diabetes are unable to absorb glucose since the beta-cells present in their pancreas either fail to produce insulin or the body’s cells are unable to respond to the insulin produced. Oranges are high in fiber and have a high glycemic index which makes it a good food option for diabetics. Also, worth mentioning is that good oranges have a sweet taste, and since diabetics aren’t allowed to eat sweets or other sugary foods, they can eat oranges to tingle their taste buds.
  • Prevents hair loss-Orange has high Vitamin C content which is required for producing collagen which, in turn, is responsible for keeping the tissues in your hair together. Nobody likes bald patches on their head, and eating oranges can ensure that you do not have to part with your lovely hair as you grow older.

How better can you get an orange than getting it from your farm, grow your oranges today by buying grafted seedlings from Oxfarm Organic Ltd. Visit our offices today or contact us.

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Kenyan Avocados: Connecting to High-value Export Markets

Kenya is frequently cited as a “bright spot” in African agriculture. Conducive government policy, strong donor support and private-sector leadership have helped to create success stories in exports to the EU. Policy changes supporting this growth include the liberalization of the fertilizer market. Following the removal of price controls and subsidies, increased competition led to lower fertilizer end-prices, triggering a 14 percentage-point increase in adoption rates among smallholders. Today, agriculture amounts to half of Kenyan GDP and employs 75% of the Kenyan workforce. Kenyan policy-makers and agribusiness players continue to prioritize the growth of agricultural exports, both in green beans and other cash crops like avocados. be

Kenya is one of the world’s largest producers of avocados, with production of 200,000 tons in 2017.For comparison, the largest producer is Mexico with about 1 million tons produced annually. Local varieties dominate Kenyan production (about 70% of total), whereas Fuerte and Hass, the varieties suitable for export, make up approximately 20% and 10%, respectively.

 

Kenyan Avocado Export Supply Chain

 

An estimated 70% of Kenyan avocados – even those for export – are produced on smallholder farms. When not linked to exporters through an out-grower scheme, farmers market their avocados through middlemen, either legally government-certified agents or unofficial brokers. These middlemen typically harvest avocados themselves and organize transport to Nairobi packhorses. This initial leg of transport is usually done with small pickup trucks. Once at the factory, avocados are quality-checked, sorted, washed, waxed, pre-cooled and packed in cartons. Once packed, exporters stuff the cartons into refrigerated containers (“reefers”) outside the processing gate, and shipping companies then transport the reefers to the Mombasa port. There, the reefers, which are controlled-atmosphere-treated, are loaded onto a ship and later trans-shipped in Salalah, Oman. Finally, the reefer containers are unloaded in Europe and delivered to importers

Most often vertically integrated with exporters, packers procure and package a 4-kilogram (kg) carton of avocados at a cost of about US$ 4.10. An additional US$ 1.60/carton is required for shipping to Europe by sea in a reefer. With the import price fluctuating around US$ 7-8/carton, the supply chain overall is profitable. This situation was enabled by government-led infrastructure investments, followed by private-sector investment in reefers, which helped to reduce transport costs versus expensive air shipments. Once this tipping point of profitability was reached, investments started to naturally flow into the sector.

Impacts of Supply Chain Barriers and Potential Solutions

Successful initiatives to overcome supply chain barriers are presented, as well as some remaining opportunities to overcome challenges to future growth.

Transport and Communications Infrastructure

Mombasa is the pivotal port for East African countries and is accessed via the main corridor, the Nairobi-Mombasa highway. By the early 1990s, the quality of this road had deteriorated due to high traffic. The Kenyan government, with the help of the World Bank and the EU, decided to invest in rehabilitating the highway.  Investments were made over approximately a decade, ending in 2005. Travel time from Nairobi to Mombasa was reduced by 40%, from 12 to 7-8 hours, and costs decreased as well. Typically, road rehabilitation projects in East Africa drive operational cost reductions of 15%. Although this saving has a marginal impact on the Kenyan avocado industry – less than 1% of the European end price – the incremental benefit is applied to many different value chains. The overall benefit for Kenya and Kenyan agricultural export value chains is thereby important.

Also Read: how to grow peaches and nectrines

 

Introduction of reefer container technology has made Europe accessible for Kenyan avocados.

One of the major challenges previously faced by this industry was the lack of suitable transport equipment. If not cooled, avocados ripen faster than the time it takes to ship them to Europe. Exports to Europe, therefore, were only possible through expensive air shipments. Alternatively, transporting by sea was only feasible for the more proximate Middle East, where avocados sell for much less than in Europe.

Recognizing this opportunity, exporters first engaged temperature-controlled, break-bulk vessels to replace expensive air freight. They then approached A.P. Moller-Maersk to present the business case for refrigerated container transport. Shipping companies consider a number of factors when evaluating a value chain for reefer investment. Most importantly, they look at the economics and growth potential of the value chain. In this case, if Kenyan avocados were able to be sold profitably when transported by air, there was a clear case for investment in sea freight, provided quality could be maintained during the journey. In addition, key enablers must be in place to ensure sustainable operations. Fortunately, the Kenyan government had invested in the Mombasa port and was able to provide the necessary infrastructure (e.g. specific plugs, berth capacity) to support reefers. Continuous investments are being made to accompany the growth of reefers in the Mombasa port, including a new berth to open this year.

Read Also:Macadamia nuts farming: How to get most returns

Early packing of containers ensures an uninterrupted cold chain. When dealing with perishable produce, maintaining an uninterrupted cold chain is critical for food quality and safety. When reefers were first introduced, exporters preferred to transport avocados to Mombasa in regular trucks and pack the reefers at the port. Over time, exporters realized that they could command a price premium in EU markets if a cold chain was begun as close to the farm as possible. This price premium outweighed the costs of bringing an empty reefer to Nairobi and loading it at the pack house gate. This extended cold-chain-arrangement also simplified logistics by eliminating one touch-point at the port, and is now common practice.

For more information on how to become a better Hass Avocado Farmer, kindly visit our offices or contact us.

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AVOCADO EXPORT FLOURISHING IN KENYA

Kenya is known to support its budget through agriculture majoring on exports of tea, coffee, flowers. However, Hass avocado is now getting a lot of attention. Kenya is in an ideal location for Avocado production since it’s in subtropical climates and avocados do well in such conditions.

South Africa and Kenya are major exporters of Avocados in Africa, with hass, fuerte, and pinkerton varieties. There is a countless potential for hass avocado production in Kenya due to its climatic conditions especially in central Kenya, upper eastern and rift-valley areas. Most avocado farms are near Nairobi, where packing factories are located for export.

Main avocado seasons for the Kenyan avocados is march to September but the fuerte one starts as early as February while the Hass is normally available from May. Nonetheless, due to the difference in climatic conditions and different avocado growing zones in Kenya, there are fruits throughout the year although in smaller quantities which are mainly sold locally.

Also, Kenya enjoys a competitive advantage over other exporting nations mainly because the hass avocado variety harvesting period extends later in the year than Peru’s, thereby granting Kenya a window of opportunity in the global market. Hass avocados from Kenya sell in European markets at roughly three times their domestic price, making the export options extremely very attractive.

 

Also Read: Hass avocado farming: Suitable Counties

More than 115,000 metric tons of avocado are produced in Kenya annually, where 70% are normally grown by small-scale farmers. Sometimes back, most avocados were traded locally, however, this trend has tremendously changed over time where now over three quarters of the produced avocados is exported overseas.

This drastic change can be attributed to technological advancements called `reefer` introduced by Maersk lines has made it possible to transport Kenyan avocados beyond the middle east to Europe markets.

Most farmers who grow Avocado are commonly found in Muranga, Kiambu, Nyeri, Kisii, Meru as well as Mt. Kenya regions. Over the years, Kenya has seen a sharp increase in the number of counties interested in Kenyan Avocados, and these countries are, Hong Kong, Russia, Singapore, Belgium, Germany, Netherlands, France, Egypt, Spain, Iran, Libya and many more. Leading exporters from Kenya include Mt. Kenya Avocado Farms.

The nutritional benefits of avocado are another boosting factor to its demand. All over the world people knows about its benefits and the wide variety of its uses. Guacamole food, with avocado as its main ingredient is very popular especially in America, greatly increases avocado consumption and importation.

Muranga county government through its Governor Mwangi Wa-Iria has started an initiative of encouraging its residents to embrace farming of hass avocados as a way of eradicating poverty as well as boosting their health. The national government of Kenya has also initiated programs that help in boosting the avocado industry to fully comply with the global requirements. Bodies like KEPHIS are actively involved in monitoring as well as educating farmers and exporters. In addition, other county governments are also helping farmers get good market rather than struggle with brokers who offer them low prices.

As you read this article today, more and more farmers are compelled to start growing Grafted hass avocados, which will triple the country’s production rates for exportation. The sky is not the limit for our esteemed farmers. The future belongs to you farmer who is willing to make your hand dirty!

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FARMERS IDENTIFY THE HIDDEN FORTUNE IN TREE-TOMATO INVESTMENT

Through our farms and experience, we have seen farmers make extraordinary profits through tree-tomato farming. Let us now explore the profits you can get through this kind of investment.

We will assume you want to plant tree tomatoes on your five-acre land.

  • 1 Acre can be planted 1200 tree-tomatoes seedlings with a spacing of 2 ½ by 2 ½ ft.
  • 1 tree yields approximately 300-800 fruits per year (this might change depending on growth factors)
  • Alternatively, 1 grafted tree-tomato yields between 20-50 kgs annual
  • 1 Grafted tree tomato seedling costs around Ksh 100
  • Sale of one fruit after maturity 5-10 kshs
  • Drip Water Irrigation 400,000 for 5 years assuming water is tapped
  • Harvesting years = 5
  • Weeding and farm preparation for the 5 years, 400,000
  • Manures & Fertilizers Ksh 300,000 (Diammonium sulphate, ammonium nitrate)
  • Controlling pests   Ksh 200,000 (diseases like Powdery mildew, tree tomato mosaic virus, aphids insets control etc)
  • Other expenses Ksh 300,000

 

For better Understanding, let us now tabulate the information.

Number of seedlings cost Labor & other Expenses Cost
 

6,000

 

600,000

Manures & Fertilizers 300,000
Weeding and Farm Preparation 400,000
Controlling Pests 200,000
Other Expenses 300,000

Lets now calculate the profits while selling one fruit @ Ksh 5

 

FIRST YEAR RETURNS

Fruit sales (5000*500*5) 7,500,000
Less Income for 10 years 1,800,000
Income for one Year 5,700,000
Income per month 475,000

You can  calculate a kilo @ Ksh 80

 

Read Also: Starting an Orchard at home isn’t As tough As you would possibly Think

NB! Throughout our research during planting and harvesting, we have noticed that not all trees yield 100% and so in the above example, we have subtracted 10-15% of the total planted seedlings in the five acres to make it 5000 that is less 1000 trees, we are assuming even if the 1000 trees would reach maturity, they won’t be as productive as the rest.

We at Oxfarm would want to be as honest as it is rather than give our farmers figures that might only appear good but do not really add up.  What we can do to our willing farmer is to inspect your land, conduct soil sampling and testing, water availability survey, land topography survey, selling our grafted tree tomatoes to you. We treat your farm like is yours by giving you free consultation and ensuring you reach the highest levels in farming.

You will realize that we have calculated on the downside by selling a fruit at 5 although the current market is at Ksh 10 and Kgs per tree per year at 30Kgs while it can go as high as 50 basically because we want our farmers to have a clear picture.

If you have any questions regarding tree tomatoes, don’t be left behind, contact us or visit our offices and we will gladly help you.

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Why Small-Scale Farmers Are Encouraged To Grow Fruits And Nuts

WHY SMALL-SCALE FARMERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO GROW FRUITS AND NUTS

Growing fruits and nuts provides a wide opportunity for kenyan poor families to enhance their incomes as well as improving the nutrition of the poor who currently suffer from deficiencies in vitamins, minerals and other micronutrients because of low
consumption of these foods.

Source Of Vitamins

According to World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), many fruits are, for example, important sources of vitamins A and C that are lacking in the diets of many Africans. Low intake of vitamin A – around 50 million African children are at risk of deficiency – is considered to be Africa’s third greatest public health problem after HIV/AIDS and malaria.

Vitamin C, on the other hand, is essential for protecting cells and keeping the body healthy and also absorbing iron from food. Vitamin C is an important mineral that is present in significant quantities in many fruits. Common fruits include HASS Avocado, Grafted Tree tomatoes, oranges, mangoes, grapes, tangerines e.t.c. Nuts on the other hand include MACADAMIA nuts, groundnuts, cashew nuts, e.t.c.

Impact of Fruits and Nuts Farming
Action on improving fruit and nut availability and quality, when coordinated, is likely to have a major positive impact on the health of African consumers and increase income generation.
If farmers receive good incomes from cultivating high quality fruits and nuts, that consumers can afford and are informed about the benefits of eating them, a strong domestic production sector can develop in Kenya.

 

The cultivation of fruits and nuts by smallholders to feed local markets and support of export markets presents a tremendous opportunity for investment, especially if the indigenous species that are recognized and valued by domestic consumers are considered as well as exotic ones. At present, about 80% of the total market value of fruit and nut crops is earned locally in Kenya, and this market is likely to grow further in the coming decade.

Source of Income

The total value of all traded production was estimated to be 650 million USD in Kenya in 2007, of which around 85% was contributed by fruits and 15% by nuts. Many fruit and nut species are rare assets in that they can be established on farms with a very modest initial investment and their value increases with time and is maintained over many years, continuing to contribute to family livelihoods and to bringing women, men and children out of poverty in a sustainable way.

By conserving these genetic resources in farmland – of indigenous species that are threatened in the natural landscape as forests recede, and of locally adapted exotic species – they are also made available to future generations, so that their livelihoods and health can also benefit.

Moreover, fruit and nut production is not amenable to much mechanization and is therefore labor-intensive, and thus plays to one of the key strengths of smallholders, which is their low labor cost, enabling them to compete with larger farmers.

Read Also: How to improve your fruit harvest

Production of Fruits and Nuts
Although the potential for improving fruit and nut production to improve incomes for small-scale farmers in Kenya and elsewhere in Africa is evident, smallholders face a number of bottlenecks in the cultivation and sale of produce. These include production constraints, such as limited species and variety development, inefficient delivery systems for delivering superior cultivars to farmers, and poor farm management practices,

With smallholders being unaware of better propagation, pest management and irrigation methods to improve quality, increase productivity and profits. In addition, farmers face market constraints, such as poor post-harvest practices that reduce sale ability, poor market delivery systems, lack of knowledge about the species and varieties for which markets are available, and lack of awareness among consumers of the health benefits of eating fruits and nuts.

Market Potential

Kenya has a very big market potential, since in most parts of Kenya, fruits are available throughout the year. This is a very long period and can be utilized to beat the export market. The major challenges facing the fruit marketing in Kenya are the competition from other producers such as South Africa and Israel; these can only be addressed by improving the quality of the fruits produced.

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