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Mango Exports To Europe Expected To Resume In September

Kenya expects to resume exporting mangoes to the European Union markets in September. The country had imposed a ban on exporting mangoes to Europe due to high levels of fruit flies. The temporary ban was imposed to protect the market and to ensure that farmers implement acceptable pest management practices. Fortunately, the eight-year self-imposed ban has been uplifted after the tests sent to the European Union indicated low fruit fly incidences.

According to Mr. Yako, the Horticultural Crops Directorate (HCD) assistant director in charge of regulations and compliance, fruit fly infestation levels have been reducing drastically. This assures that producers and exporters can resume enjoying the lucrative EU markets.

Local fruit farmers have been battling with the fruit fly for almost two decades when Sri Lanka reported the presence of the pest in the country in 2003. Between 2010 and 2014, the presence of fruit fly infestation on Kenyan mangoes resulted in interceptions of several consignments by European Union regulatory authorities.

To minimize the fruit fly populations and to create pest-free zones, new strategies have been implemented. For instance, the government has been providing traps to small-scale farmers and has also launched the Komesha Fruit Fly Campaign. Besides, mango producers have been advised to embrace modern agricultural practices, use traps, and adhere to integrated pest management practices.

When the ban was enforced, Kenya shifted the exports to Middle East markets, selling the fruits at relatively lower prices compared to EU states. When mango exports to the EU resume, prices are expected to hike from Ksh 8 to Ksh 30 per fruit. In Europe for instance, a 4 kg carton costs Ksh 350 which translates into an average of Ksh 35 per fruit.

The government is collaborating with small-scale and large-scale producers to implement successful approaches to tame the spread of fruit flies and it has assured that there will be no complications in reopening the market.

Even as the market resumes, it has been noted that mangoes still find their way to Europe through third part markets, especially in Middle East countries such as the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia.  To maintain its reputation and to prevent the entry of quarantine pests to EU states, the country has imposed tougher measures and wants a mark of origin on all horticultural produce exported to the European Union and other parts of the world.  A mark of origin will assure buyers in the European Union that the mangoes are coming from Kenya. Besides farmers will fetch higher returns compared to that from Middle East markets.

In Kenya, mango production is a significant economic enterprise. Commercial farmers mainly grow varieties known as Keitt, Kent, Apple, and Ngowe. Apart from a competitive advantage in the export markets, Kenyan mangoes have a unique value proposition. They are mainly produced in the Ukambani region especially Machakos, Makueni, and Kitui Counties, and in the Coastal regions. In Makueni, Apple, Kent, and Keitt are the most commonly grown varieties.

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Tips that can help you devise effective crop protection strategies in fruit farming

Crop protection is a challenge for most tree nut, fruit, and vegetable farmers. Attacks by pests, fungal and bacterial diseases, depleted soil, and harsh climatic conditions cause massive damage to crops in different parts of the country causing significant losses for farmers. There are various strategies you should implement to ensure optimum crop protection.

Develop a regular monitoring weed, pest, and disease monitoring program

To achieve sustainable crop production, it’s important to invest in crop monitoring. It helps growers to detect pests and possible disease development, understand the performance of their crops, and helps them create resilient farming systems. Crop monitoring minimizes crop protection costs which can arise when plants are heavily infested by pests or attacked by diseases. In fruit production, it’s important to develop a centralized and independent monitoring system to help growers devise successful pest, disease, and weed control strategies.

Manage pests and diseases on time

Pests and diseases can adversely affect crop performance and overall production. At times, they can destroy the entire produce fruits causing losses to the farmer.

  • Pests and diseases in fruit trees can be controlled in various ways such as:
  • Planting high-quality varieties that are resistant to various pests and diseases
  • Defending young plants against pest and disease pressures
  • Use chemical control, especially in severe cases to control pests and disease development. However, pesticides and fungicides should be applied at controlled levels. For instance, using copper-based pesticides extensively can cause damage to newly emerged leaves of pear, plum, and apple trees.
  • Embrace cultural pest control
  • Introduce beneficial insects such as ladybugs to minimize the populations of pests such as aphids, mites, and scales.

Managing weather risks

Crops are always susceptible to weather risks and unpredictable climatic conditions. Phenomena such as hail, drought, floods, and extreme temperatures can cause serious crop damage, especially in the early, flowering, and fruit development stages. Before venturing into fruit farming, it’s important to understand the weather patterns in your region and to understand the ecological requirements of the tree you are planning to grow. Fruit trees such as citrus, avocado, and macadamia can tolerate harsh climatic conditions while strawberries, grapes, and watermelon are easily affected. Understanding your climate will help you plant crops that are suitable for your region and to prepare the field for harsh weather conditions.

Weed Management

Weeds deprive the grown fruit trees, competing with them for nutrients and water. Besides, some weeds carry diseases while others act as hosts for pests such as Tuta absoluta. Each year, farmers lose a significant percentage of their harvests because of weeds, pests, and diseases. They can be controlled in various ways such as:

  • Mulching
  • Planting cover crops such as legumes
  • Chemical control using herbicides
  • Biological and agrotechnical control

Stay ahead in Fruit farming with Oxfarm Ltd solutions

Whether you are a novice organic fruit grower seeking crop protection strategies or an established convectional farmer looking to adapt to the changing climate and rising water shortages, Oxfarm has different solutions to help your crops flourish. Apart from drip irrigation systems and high-quality seedlings, Oxfarm also provides enticing packages to help you establish your commercial orchard and helps you devise effective pest, disease, and farm management strategies. As a way of helping farmers enjoy the productivity and profitability of fruit farming, Oxfarm provides an extensive selection of crop protection solutions that farmers can use in their orchards.

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The Unconventional Relationship Between Fruit Farmers and the Changing Climate

The relationship between a farmer and the weather varies from people who are not affected or depend on the changing weather conditions. For people who love outdoor activities such as hiking and traveling, a sunny day is all they would wish. However, farmers want balanced weather conditions, with moderate rainfall alternating with a sunny day.

On most occasions, the relationship can be hard to describe since the weather has become indispensable and unpredictable. Besides, the ecological requirements for different crops vary.

All farmers require rainfall

The water requirements for different crops, which mean that most crops show a different response when the water levels are beyond what they require. Farmers usually pray for balanced temperatures, sunshine, and rainfall for their crops to achieve maximum productivity. However, this does not happen and they have to adapt to the unpredictable weather patterns and adopt various strategies to achieve the balance.

Working with different weather requirements

Fruit trees require different weather conditions to flourish, which means that farmers have different weather needs. For farmers rearing livestock and growing multiple crops, the view of optimum weather becomes more complex.

A rainy season with cold-weather helps out thirsty crops. However, another crop might require a warm, dry spell to fully mature for harvest. For instance, crops such as grapes require temperature shifts between day and night to preserve their acidity and to lengthen the growing season, giving them more time to mature. However, extreme temperature variations in other crops such as watermelon and citrus promote disease development. Before investing in fruit trees, farmers should first understand the ecological requirements of the plant they want to grow and the soil and weather conditions in their region.

The need for conversation in extreme weather unifies farmers

With the increasing effects of climate change and extreme global warming, predicting weather patterns has become difficult. No farmer hopes for harsh weather conditions such as extreme cold or heat, drought, and flooding.

When a certain region is affected by extreme conditions, the need for conversations to devise better ways to adapt to the changing climate brings different farmers together. For fruit farmers, when severe weather conditions strike, farmers from different agricultural communities come together to share ideas and resources to cushion themselves from the impact. For instance, prolonged heavy rainfall favors the development of diseases such as powdery mildew, anthracnose, and root rot in plants such as strawberries, grapes, and watermelon. Prolonged drier seasons with extreme temperatures favor the growth of thrips which can cause massive damage to plants, especially when they attack fruit trees during the flowering stage. Such uncertain times bring farmers together to share ideas on better strategies they can implement in their farms to keep their crops healthy and productive.

Prioritizing on weather monitoring helps in achieving success

The weather requirements for different crops vary. Some crops require a certain temperature range to germinate, grow, and form fruits. Temperatures, humidity, rainfall, and wind can be used to predict the occurrence of various diseases and pests. Investing in weather monitoring can help farmers obtain essential information to assist them in devising planting plans, crop protection and farm management programs, and harvesting strategies. This helps the crops to achieve optimum performance and to avoid yield losses.

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Can Fruit Appearance Affect Farmer’s Profitability?

Fruit appearance matters

Purchasing food either in supermarkets, food stores or local groceries is always in the daily activity list. When walking through stores, it’s easy to spot fresh fruits and vegetables. However, you may have wondered how the fruits are produced and all of them e.g. apples the same as the ones in the grocery or food store. Well, fruits have a different appearance (shape, size and colour). Not all apples are red and of the same size and not all bananas are yellow. Fruit appearance vary in varieties, each having its own unique characteristics and that’s where their beauty originates from. 

The export market is highly demanding when it comes to fruit quality. There are strict measures to ensure that farmers produce high-quality fruits. Same requirements are also in the local market especially in supermarkets and hotels. When fruit farmers fail to meet the required quality, groceries are forced to discard the fruits and end up not buying the produce again. Farmers end up selling at distress prices and are left with a large bunch of fruits. What’s the final result? The food becomes waste and the farmer makes losses and ends up regretting why they invested in fruit farming.

Can fruit appearance affect farmer’s profitability?

Fruit appearance is one of the factors that can determine whether a customer purchases the fruit or not. The colour of fruits is mainly determined by the ecological conditions and management techniques applied. Ecological conditions have a great impact in fruit appearance. For instance, in grape farming, sunlight determines the colour concentrations. When the vineyards receive direct and concentrated sunlight, the grapes develop thicker skin which enhances colour concentrations, flavour profiles, and makes them have stronger tannins. If properly taken care of, grapes with good colour concentrations will always have a higher demand and buyers will always compete for the fruits in the orchard.

When fruits such as apples, mangoes, bananas, or avocados are stored for longer periods, they tend to lose their colour and attractive appearance. When fruits stay for longer periods in the farm upon maturity, they start losing their appearance. Also, when fruits are attacked by pests and diseases, their quality and appearance deteriorates. Such fruits can barely attract any buyers and only a small amount makes it to the market. What does this mean? The farmer can only sell at low prices hence low profits. Few customers are willing to buy less attractive fruits.

How to maintain and enhance fruit appearance and quality

Soil Testing and Agronomy support

Agronomists play an important role in your fruit farming venture. They help you identify your weaknesses, areas you need to improve on, monitor the performance of the trees and conduct soil testing to determine the nutrients absent and need to be supplemented in the soil. They also help you know the pest and disease control mechanism that you should employ. Consulting the experts such as Oxfarm Ag Ltd can help you improve the fruit appearance and quality and enable you to succeed in fruit farming.

Regular weeding

Weeds compete with fruit trees in an orchard for nutrients and water. They also encourage pest infestation and disease development. Orchards should hence be weed-free. Planting cover crops such as legumes and mulching is encouraged to minimize the growth of weeds.

Timely control of pest and diseases

Pests and diseases great affect fruit appearance and quality. For instance, pests such as mites can cause black spots brown spots on avocado fruits while thrips can cause leathery scars. Diseases such as sunblotch can cause discoloration of fruits which in turn affects the fruit appearance.  Regular scouting is recommended to help farmers identify and control pests and diseases in a timely manner.

Consistent application of manure and fertilizers

Fruit trees are heavy feeders and require consistent application of nutrients. Manure should be applied regularly to enhance the growth of plants. Fertilizers should also be applied to supplement nutrients and boost fruit quality.

Oxfarm offers Agronomy support as well as sale of highly certified seedlings.

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Cigar end rot disease in Bananas

Cigar end rot is a disease that can ruin your banana farming venture. It is prevalent in almost all banana growing tracts. It affects the developing fingers which results in the tip ends of the fingers drying up. The ends resemble the greying ash of a cigar. Affected fingers are rejected in the market and hence can result in huge losses. It is therefore important to control the disease before its too late. The fungal disease can also attack ripening banana fruits making a dry rot to develop at the flower ends. During transportation or storage, cigar end rot can progress to the entire fruit. This disease is common when there is high rainfall.

Disease Cycle of Cigar end rot

The pathogen gets into the banana finger through the flower resulting in the formation of a dry rot that spreads to immature banana fingers. Fungal spores/ conidia are spread by air currents and the days mainly occur in the early days of fruit formation. The infection spreads slowly as the fruit develops leading to skin blackening. With time, the tips of the infected fingers are fully covered with a powdery mass of spores. Cigar end rot is common in plantations with excessive shade and high altitude areas with moist conditions.

Common Signs & Symptoms

  • Presence of black necrosis which spreads from the perianth to the tip of immature fingers.
  • Dry rot develops on the pulp of the infected banana fruit. At times, the rot can spread even up to 2 centimeters from the tip of the fingers.
  • The wrinkled necrotic tissue eventually becomes completely covered with the mycelia of the fungi.
  • The entire finger can get rotten especially when the emerging fingers are affected.

Etiology

  • The formed fungal spores are hyaline, oblong to cylindrical. These spores are mostly in small groups.
  • Since they are asexual spores, conidia are borne at the ends of tapering phialides.
  • The dormant mycelia are the primary source of inoculum while air and soil-borne conidia are the secondary sources of inoculum.
    Epidemiology
  • High humidity ranging from 90-92%, high rainfall and low temperatures, and weak plants provide an ideal environment for disease development.

Management of Cigar end Rot Disease

  • Farmers should use healthy and disease-free and resistant plants.
  • Filed sanitation should be maintained at all times. Since the disease is carried by an alternate host, all potential hosts of the fungus should be removed from the banana plantation immediately. Dead, hanging leaves should be removed from the plants to lower the inoculum level.
  • Once the fruits have been formed, the perianth and pistil should be removed immediately. Infected fingers should be removed and destroyed.
  • Enough aeration should be ensured in the plantation by minimizing the overcrowding of the banana plants.
  • Polythene sleeves should be placed over the stems before the fingers emerge.
  • Maturing stems should be constantly bagged.
  • The bunches should be sprayed with copper fungicides to prevent disease formation.
  • To minimize the chances of post-harvest infestation, ripening room and packing stations should be kept clean.

If controlled, cigar end rot can result in huge losses. Over the past few years, the occurrence of the disease has increased simply because farmers are unable to employ proper management techniques. Healthy and disease-resistant varieties are what anyone should consider planting.

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How to Manage Anthracnose in Watermelon

Anthracnose in Watermelon

Over the years, the demand for watermelon has been increasing rapidly, both locally and internationally. Watermelon has become a crucial part of most fruit salads. It is common to find melon slices served in groceries, alongside lunches during weddings, conferences, cooperate retreats, and also at homes. The success of watermelon farming, however, depends on the quality of fruits and the overall yield. When the fruits are affected by pests and diseases, most likely, nobody will be willing to buy them. Anthracnose is a destructive fungal disease that can ruin your watermelon farming venture if it is not controlled. If not controlled, it can damage the fruits and lead to vine death. When the plants are severely infected, especially when there are numerous lesions, anthracnose causes vine defoliation leading to low-quality fruits and a significant yield reduction.

Symptoms of Anthracnose in Watermelon

This disease is common in cucurbits such as melon and cucumber. At its early stages, water-soaked spots appear on the leaves which become brown as the disease progresses. Eventually, these spots darken and expand over the surfaces with the foliar lesions developing cracked centers. When stems and petioles are infected, they develop shallow, elongated, tan lesions that girdle the stem resulting to plant wilting. Infected fruits form circular, sunken, black lesions, providing an ideal environment for the formation of acervuli (small fruiting bodies). Under humid conditions, acervuli produce conidia which makes the lesions to have a pinkish color, a unique characteristic of anthracnose. When the disease gets to the pedicels of young fruits, the fruit either abort or shrivel.

Conditions for Disease development

Colletotrichum orbiculare, the causative agent of anthracnose, mostly comes in the seed or infected crop debris. The fungus can be spread by overhead irrigation, insects, splashing water, farm equipment, and field workers. The development of the disease is favored by warm weather and high humidity. The optimum temperature for anthracnose is 24°C. Later infection may inhibit the marketability of the fruits during storage, shipping, and display.

How to Control Anthracnose in Watermelon

The disease develops and spreads in warm, moist conditions, although the fungus can be carried in seeds, and infected debris. Infected vines should, therefore, be removed from the farm and destroyed. Farmers can also implement a comprehensive preventative fungicide program to prevent anthracnose.

Non-chemical control method

  • Avoid composting infected plants. Instead, they should be removed and destroyed.
  • Use varieties resistant from anthracnose.
  • Plant certified watermelon seeds and healthy plants.
  • Plant trees in well-drained soil.
  • Plant the watermelon in well-drained soils.
  • Ensure constant crop rotation with non-host plants such as cucurbits and French beans every 2 to 3 years.
  • To prevent wetting the foliage, avoid overhead irrigation. Also, avoid touching the plants when they are wet.
  • Control all weeds especially the volunteer cucurbits since they can host the anthracnose fungus.
  • Control all weeds, especially wild and volunteer cucurbits
  • Avoid wounding to prevent post-harvest losses since anthracnose can develop and the wounded part of the harvested fruit.

If the disease is controlled, watermelon farming is a disease that can rake you millions of money. The demand for watermelon is yet to be met and hence this is the venture one can consider.

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Two Major structures used in Grafting Fruit Trees

Hass Avocado Seedlings in our Nurseries

Grafting is a technique that is used to combine two plants to produce the desired rootstock, providing trees with the desired fruit characteristics. Grafted plants develop resistance to soil-borne diseases such as bacterial wilt, southern blight, fusarium wilt, root-knot nematodes, and verticillium wilt. It also enables the plants to withstand harsh climatic conditions and to overcome salinity issues. The grafted part is composed of the scion (the top of the grafted plant) and the rootstock (the bottom part). Grafting success is facilitated by the propagation environment, grafting methods and grafting seasons. Greenhouses and shade net houses are common structures in grafting nurseries.

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Greenhouses

They are categorized into two; high cost and low-cost greenhouses. The high-cost greenhouse comprises of a polythene sheet set on metallic ashes. This type is easy to build and it can withstand strong winds without getting damaged. Greenhouses offer an ideal environment for grafted plants. Temperatures inside the greenhouse are higher than in the outside environment although they can be maintained at the desired level. The humidity in the greenhouses can be raised by sprinkling water even during the cold season. Since they offer a propagated environment, the success rate of the plants is high. The investment capacity determines the type of greenhouses and shade net houses required. It is effective for both small scale and large scale graft plants’ nurseries.

Integrating liquid fertlizers through Fertigation into irrigation systems

Shade net houses

A systematic shade house is required for both small and large scale multiplication of graft plants. Mostly, young graft plants need a regulated environment in partial shade. Shade net houses can be easily built since only wooden poles are used to support the shade net. They allow the circulation of air and are not affected by wind. They offer a controlled environment required for the proper growth of the graft plants.

In a controlled environment, the graft plants take fewer days to sprout. These plants have a high number of leaves and grow at a faster rate. In Greenhouses and shade net houses, the grafts seem to heal quickly. The graft exposure to optimum temperature and humidity results in variations in the number of leaves of the graft plants. High humidity helps in the formation of the callus between the scion and stock and also prevents the scion from drying. Compatibility between the scion and the stock promotes cambium formation and easy union formation.

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Why You Should Invest in Vegetable and Fruit Farming

Presently, the demand for fruits and vegies from Kenya has been temperate and high for both organic and value added products. Nonetheless, Most producers and companies exporting fresh fruits and vegetables from Kenya are both small and Medium with little if any investment capacity to broaden the production and take advantage of the market demand, and therefore have been unable to explore the export of value added products currently on demand in Europe and other International markets.

A good number of the current exports have been in raw fruits and vegetables and largely to the wholesale markets where competition is growing and prices going down. Currently, there are over 30 companies exporting fresh fruits and vegetables largely to the EU and, to a less extent, to the COMESA region, although the latter is largely informal. On average, the existing companies each exports 2 – 40 tonnes of fresh fruits per week, largely to the wholesale markets in Europe.

 Competitiveness

Competitiveness in Kenya rests with soils, irrigation, climate, opportunities, government policies as well as labour factor prices. Kenya has matchless comparative advantage for growing fruits and vegetables due to its warm, less humid tropical climate, plentiful rainfall and huge opportunities for irrigation. Soils of pH 5 to 6.5 are most ideal for the fruits (such as oranges, Avocados, mangoes and pineapples) and vast areas of this type is obtained in Kenya.

These soils are rare in the world.  Kenya’s climate is summer all year round: moderate temperatures (15 -30ºC) throughout the year with a bi-modal rainfall pattern. The soils have low levels of contamination due to prolonged periods of minimal use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides and herbicides creating natural quasi-organic conditions in most areas.

The November to February harvest period in Kenya coincides with the northern hemisphere winter – a period of peak demand for fresh fruits and vegetables in Europe.

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Justification behind vegetable and fruit farming

There is plenty of land in the country that can be devoted to fruit farming. The government owned irrigation schemes can provide ample land. Besides there is an increasing number of out growers complimenting the raw material supply effort.  The out growers however may be supported with skills, implements. An investor in fruit farming has the option of irrigating the fruit farms to ensure all year round production.

The demand for fresh fruits on a year-round   basis is increasing, and consumers are willing to pay higher prices for out-of-season fresh fruits.  Given EU market entry barriers, Kenya would rather target domestic, border and regional markets. Currently, there is an existing trade within the region supplying Southern Sudan, Uganda and Rwanda. The current production levels of fruits are yet to satisfy the domestic, border and regional demand. It is strategic to strengthen the existing trade which is not satisfied and yet expanding.

However, we have been advising our customers on the best practices that will ensure they sell their produce in  the International markets.

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You Only Have One Month To Prepare; Hass Avocado Farming Package

Hass Avocado farming

If you can remember about last long-rain season of 2018 most farmers were caught unaware since the long rains started a bit earlier than expected. A delay in planting can lead to many inconveniences leading to huge losses.

Timely planting

Timely planting as we call it means that you need to have everything prepared for the long rains before it starts. Planning and preparing early will help you avoid costly mistakes.

If you are planning to invest in hass avocado we got you covered by assisting you plan. Taking into consideration this is a long-term investment you are required to put several issues in your list.

First, you need to conduct a soil analysis to know how healthy your soil is. Soil is one of the factors a farmer can control and get better yields.  The analysis will determine the soil PH, nutrients available (both micro and macro), soil organic matter as well as cation exchange capacity. Soil analysis is done during dry season so that the control measure is done early enough. OxfarmAg Ltd will help you get through with this process especially before this coming season. We normally visit your farm pick samples for analysis and advice you recommendation to take.  Most of the farms that we have visited in Central and Rift valley region require addition lime to reduce acidity.

The second benefit of preparing your farm early is ploughing and digging of holes for planting which should be done early to allow more time for other consecutive work to be timely done. With OxfarmAg Limited as your partner, we will help you achieve this. Our team is able to assist in digging holes with the recommended sizes as well as ensuring proper spacing for hass avocado farming. We do this putting into consideration the direction of the sun (North-South Orientation).

During land and holes preparation we also assist in mixing of the top soil with manure in a proper proportion to avoid damage of roots after planting.

 

Seedlings Selection

Nowadays emergence of small nurseries is everywhere and most of these operators don’t meet requirements for operating a nursery. Most of them have hass seedlings that are not certified by Kenya Plant Health Inspectorate Service – KEPHIS and registered by Horticultural Crop Directorate – HCD. A genuine nursery should operate with both certificates. Buying the seedlings from these nurseries which at times might be cheaper can save you a few coins for now but will result in huge losses and regret in say 3-5 years from now. Consideration should be emphasized from the rootstock selection, scion from true to type hass avocado variety and propagation method have to be adhered to standard set.

At OxfarmAg limited we propagate and we ensures that you get certified quality true to type hass avocado plants.

 

Planting

We carry out planting during the rainy season or with irrigation water. This is the most sensitive part of any hass avocado farming enterprise. Planting determines about 30% success your enterprise. Proper planting will avoid first drying of your seedlings, second root rot diseases and third fast maturity of the plants where a farmer start harvesting within the first 2-3 years.

Engage OxfarmAg Ltd we will plant your seedlings professionally and never regret.

 

Pollination

Hass avocado abort heavenly for several reasons; nutrients available for the plants, pests and diseases, weather patterns and also pollination plays a big role.

During planting we ensure we follow a guideline where we inter-crop with some Fuertes to boost on cross pollination. This ensures more fruits in your trees, better fruit development and also larger sizes of fruits.

 

Pests and Disease control

Most avocado farmers are not concerned about pests and diseases which also play a big role to the productivity of the trees. Farmers are used to grow the traditional (Kienyeji) avocados without much care. For better production of hass avocados, quality maintenance and export requirement, ensure you get advice from OxfarmAg Ltd.

 

Irrigation, Pruning and Harvesting

When considering best ways to manage your farm, the above practices are crucial. When we walk with you this journey, we will help you and teach you how to go about all the above processes.

 

Marketing

OxfarmAg Ltd together with other exporting companies and local processors have partnered to ensure all the fruits you get from your farm get the best market prices. We grade your fruits for exports and for local oil extraction processing.

 

OxfarmAg Ltd Contract with Farmers

We have planting services for our farmers which involve signing a contract between the company OxfarmAg Ltd and the Farmer for 3-4 months depending on how long the process will take from farm preparation to planting of seedlings.

Our packages per acre include: soil analysis, planning, measurement and digging of holes, delivery of 150 seedlings to the farm, planting and monitoring for 3 months. All these services you get at a cost of Ksh 40,000 per acre.

Farmer should ensure the farm is cleared, provide manure and other management practices like irrigation, removal of suckers, and security of seedlings e.t.c. We do this in most parts of Kenya all you need to do is to call us get to know if hass avocado can do well and if they can do, you invite us for farm visit and advice.

Call,Text,Whatsapp 0706222888

Email; info@oxfarm.co.ke and request for quotation and sample contract.

 

From the first engagement we become your lifetime partners in farming by offering agronomy advice and discounts. Our added advantage is that we can assist in giving you options of some other crops that you can intercrop with hass and get to recover your initial investment soonest.

 

About us

OxfarmAg Ltd

oxfarm.co.ke / oxfarmorganic.com

We are an online agricultural information portal providing solutions to pressing issues affecting farmers in Kenya, like access to information, research and technology in farming, market trends and connecting farmers with potential market/buyers. We are registered under Kenya company act by the name OxfarmAg Ltd. We are certified to provide agricultural inputs mostly seedlings of high quality. We have qualified agriculturists in most part of Kenya who are involved in management of various agricultural projects. We believe nowadays Money grows on trees.

 

P.O. Box 3552-00100 Nairobi-Kenya

Contacts: +254 706 222 888 or +254 723 662 773/

Email; info@oxfarm.co.ke

Website; http://oxfarm.co.ke/ or www.oxfarmorganic.com 

 

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Interested in the fruit farming and export business in Kenya?

Orange fruit farming

Kenyan’s potential in fruit production is rather untapped when compared to South American and Asian countries that dominate the export market. It is high time that Kenyans start to look out for ways of exploiting the demand that is growing and the lucrative market for tropical fruits both domestically and internationally.

How huge is the potential for the fruit farming and export business in Kenya?

As millions of people around the world look for healthier and organic foods, fruits are growing in demand both locally and globally.

Apart from the millions of fruits that we eat at home in Kenya, many of us do not notice the huge volumes of bananas, pineapples, mangoes and several other tropical fruit varieties that are shipped to Europe, the Middle East and USA every week!

Kenya has a unique advantage to profit from this very lucrative market for tropical fruits which grow abundantly on our continent.

This post explores the tropical fruit business and looks at a couple of successful entrepreneurs who are already exploiting the potentials of the fruit production business in Kenya. In our earlier posts, we have also included very detailed manuals that reveal all the technical details of starting and succeeding in fruit farming.

Why Is The Market Potential For Tropical Fruit farming Huge For Kenya?

Our research has identified three strong reasons why Kenya’s future in the tropical fruits business is shining very bright. Here they are:-

·         Kenya Has A Strong Geographic Advantage

More than 70 percent of fruits consumed on earth come from the tropics, which is why they’re called ‘tropical fruits’.

A very large portion of Africa is located in the tropics – a region that enjoys all-year-round sunlight and has a perfect climate for fruits to thrive and grow abundantly.

As a result, Kenya and Africa at large remains one of the world’s largest producers of some of the most popular fruits on the planet – citrus, pineapples, bananas and many others.

Despite our continent’s huge potential for fruit farming business, a lot of fruits grown in Kenyan are consumed locally.

Because fruits are highly perishable (spoil very quickly) and many farmers have little access to good storage facilities, Kenya currently exports less than 5 percent of the fruits it produces every year.

However, there are signs of positive change as some entrepreneurs are already making the best of this bad situation.

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·         A Growing Demand For Healthier And Organic Foods

Due to the revelations by modern science about the health benefits of eating fruits and vegetables, millions of people around the world (especially in developed countries) now include some form of fruit in their daily diets.

Apart from their rich nutrient, mineral and vitamin content, fruits are now known to lower blood pressure; reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, and probably some cancers; and help to lower the risk of eye and digestive system problems.

The growing consciousness in Western countries to adopt fruit-rich diets is one of the major drivers of the growing demand for tropical fruits which are abundant in Kenya. As a result, countries like Ghana, South Africa, Ivory Coast and Kenya earn millions of dollars every year from fruit exports to Europe, the Middle East and USA.

According to the World Health Organisation, millions of people around the world still die prematurely from diseases associated with low fruit consumption. While this is sad, it signals a promising and lucrative growth in the demand for Kenyan tropical fruits now and in the future as more people add fruits to their diets.

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·         A Rapidly Growing Fruit Juice Industry

Recently, Prof Kibwana the Makueni County governor launched a mango processing plant which is meant to buy mangoes from residents of Machakos, Kitui and Makueni to process juice. These are some of the changes that we are talking about. Value addition is taking shape in Kenya and in the near future Kenya will be producing finished products. Another company in Mweiga Nyeri County is producing juice from tree tomato fruits. Tamarillo farm in Nyeri is now processing tree tomato fruits to produce chillie source, jams, and juice.

This rapid growth is driven by a rising preference by customers for healthy drinks (like fruit juices) over soft drinks (such as carbonated drinks – like Coke and Pepsi). There is also a rising demand for organic, super fruit and 100 percent natural fruit juices without any sweeteners and preservatives.

This means that in the very near future, producers will require more raw fruits to make a glass of juice making fruit farming business lucrative.

As more manufacturers shop for fruits to produce more juice to serve the growing demand, Kenya will become a huge supplier due to the abundance of fruits that grow on the country. This added demand from fruit juice manufacturers is allowing farmers across Kenya to process their harvested fruits into less perishable concentrates thereby reducing spoilage and earning them more money.

If you are confident that the fruit business will work for you, it’s important that you start taking action as soon as possible. Oxfarm is here to help you by providing certified seedlings as well as required information that can help you grow.