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How to improve your fruit harvest

Growing your own fruit means that you can enjoy the pick of delicious varieties fresh from the tree or bush, turn them into pies, jellies and jams or store for future use. And you don’t need a lot of space, either – in small gardens, you can grow fruit as cordons or trained trees. You can also grow fruit in containers.

With a little care throughout the year, you can enjoy the best possible harvests – here’s how.

Plant at least two fruit trees

Plant at least two fruit trees so that they can cross pollinate. Where space is limited, choose self-pollinating varieties that fruit on their own, or try family trees with several varieties grafted onto a single trunk.

Protect blossom

Protect blossom from frost if possible, by covering with fleece. Remove the covers by midday so that pollinating insects can get in, then recover at night.

Mulch

Mulch around the base of plants with well-rotted organic matter in autumn, to lock in nutrients and water into the soil, and suppress weeds. Use pine needles around berries as they create the acidic conditions they love. Scatter slow-release fertiliser, such as chicken manure, each spring onto moist soil.

Water regularly

Water new fruit plants regularly until they are established, and continue to water any plants in pots. Water all fruit plants when they have ripening fruit, but be careful not to over-water as this can lead to tasteless fruit and can leach nutrients from the soil.

Related Post: drip irrigation in fruits

Pick off fruits

Pick off baby fruits from newly planted fruit trees in their first season. It takes willpower, but it allows the tree to concentrate on establishing well. Mature trees will drop fruits early in the season (called the ‘June drop’) but it’s a good idea to thin fruits growing too close together so that those remaining have room to mature.

Underplant with flowers

Underplant fruit with nectar-rich flowers such as nepeta, lavender or annual flower mixes to attract bees and other pollinating insects – they’ll pollinate your blossom at the same time.

Let fruit ripen fully

Let fruits ripen fully on the plant or tree, so that they have more time to build up nutrients. But pick them before they become overripe as they may rot and spread disease – and will attract wasps too.

For more information, visit our offices, and book your seedlings early enough.

 

 

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Benefits of Growing Your Own Fruits

Benefits for you and your family:

  • Fresh and nutritious fruits. Fruits from your own garden are higher in nutrients than the ones that have traveled several thousand miles to get to your grocery store.
  • Having your children assist you in the garden can increase the chance that they will eat more of the fruits and vegetables they have helped to grow.
  • Growing your own fruits can offer you the opportunity to reduce the amount of pesticides that you use in your garden, making them healthier.
  • Growing your own fruits will save your money at the grocery store.
  • Gardening increases physical activity. It is a great way to engage the whole family in physical activity and lets them help to take responsibility for the garden.
  • The fruits grown in your garden will promote health because they are rich in nutrients, especially in phytochemicals, anti-oxidants, vitamin C, vitamin A and folate.
  • Gardening gives you’re a real sense of appreciation when you can see the bounty of your efforts.
  • Growing a garden gives you a new appreciation for nature, when you can have the opportunity to see how things grow.
  • Gardening may stimulate many new interests. You may want to learn more about botany, landscape architecture, photography, nutrition, and farmer’s markets.
  • Gardening gives you the opportunity to give back. If you have an abundant garden, you might give some of your produce to the local soup kitchen or food bank.
  • This can be a great time to create memories with your children, memories that can last a lifetime.
  • Your garden can lead to new skills, and knowledge for you and your family, your child may have a new found interest to become a farmer!

Society and Community

  • Gardens can foster a great sense of community through parent to parent connections, teacher to student or student to student.
  • Schools and community may decide to build a community or school garden. This is a tremendous learning tool for all involved as well a providing a source of nutritious fruits
  • A community/school garden can help to foster and motivate future leaders (e.g., 4-H afterschool programs).
  • Neighborhood Community Gardens beautify landscape, support local farmers, can create a food secure community where residents do not need to rely on vendors to supply fresh produce.

Environment

Tall fruit trees provide shade.

  • You can use less pesticides or use natural pesticides and this will be less contamination to the environment.
  • Produce peels and waste can create a lot of green waste and takes up a lot of space in the garbage can. Recycle them to make your own compost. It is less expensive than buying fertilizers.
  • Turn unsightly lands into attractive landscapes.
  • Get creative. There is a potential to grow an innovative gardens like futuristic horticulture gardens that are very cost-effective and require substantially less space.

If you’ve got a bit of empty space on your farm, growing a fruit tree is a good way to fill it and still get a passive income- beehives are a similar option, but you can surround a grown tree with beehives for kicks.

Investing in more fruit trees will make them more worthwhile, definitely- the combined benefit of many fruits is always going to be more apparently valuable for the time you spend interacting with the tree every few days. Even ignoring the quality level gain of a fruit tree and placing some kegs or preserves jars right next to your trees can boost the profits you’re seeing from your tree without much extra effort, or you could keep them around as a guarantee of some portable energy consumables during a given season.

Start exploring today!! Book seedlings today!

 

 

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Fruit grafting provides better varieties

Fruit grafting provides better varieties

Keen gardeners could already be at home with a farming technique referred to as grafting. For hundreds of years, orchardists, rosarians, nursery homeowners and different growers have used this method to form plants with improved malady resistance and strength, increased yields and distinctive physical forms, and to form fruit trees that bear multiple varieties on a similar tree.

Though there are many sorts of graft, in its simplest kind, graft attaches the shoot system (the scion) of 1 plant to the basis system (the rootstock) of a separate plant. The 2 are grafted along in a very straightforward procedure, and once the graft union has cured, the 2 plants grow joined.

Fruit grafting permits growers to mix the positive attributes of 2 varieties into one fruit tree. In most cases, the descendant and rootstock should be from a similar species (or, sometimes, a similar family) so as for them to be compatible and for the graft union to require. But, you’ll graft associate apricot with a fruit tree because they are within the same stone-fruit family.

Related Content: apple farming in Kenya: mitigating risks

How Fruit Grafting is Done

Avocado Fruit grafting

The technique of fruit grafting permits farmers to possess dwarf fruit trees (the dwarfing attribute is carried within the rootstock), apples that bear 5 varieties on a similar tree, and a “fruit cocktail tree” that grows many styles of fruit, every on its own branch.

The rootstock chosen for graft is usually chosen for the intensity or malady resistance of that individual selection. The shoot system, or scion, is chosen for flower color, fruit production or distinctive growth kind.

Grafting is kind of common among fruit and decorative trees, particularly those with distinctive or specialized forms. As an example, several weeping trees are created by graft a nodding shoot system onto a straight-trunked form of a similar plant, and a few maples is also grafted onto totally different rootstocks to enhance their winter strength.

One slightly newer means the technique of graft has found its means into our gardens is thru vegetables. Some seed catalogs carry grafted tomatoes, peppers, melons and different vegetables. Although these plants are commercially fully grown in different components of the globe for several years, they are just finding a direct the us.

Grafted fruits are created by choosing a great-tasting, heavy-yielding selection and graft it to a rootstock with improved malady and gadfly resistance, early maturity, drought tolerance, and/or vigorous growth. the thought is that these grafted plants can perform higher and turn out sooner than those fruits that are un-grafted.

Keep in mind, though, that graft is helpful just for the generation of plants on that it had been performed. The enhancements created through graft aren’t carried to ensuing generation via saved seeds or perhaps by taking cuttings of the plant. graft cannot lead to improved issue like purposeful plant breeding can; it’s just a noteworthy thanks to mix the positive attributes of 2 plants into one.

If you need any help towards in sourcing grafted seedlings, planting instructions and other technical advice, Visit our offices or contact us.

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FARMERS IDENTIFY THE HIDDEN FORTUNE IN TREE-TOMATO INVESTMENT

Through our farms and experience, we have seen farmers make extraordinary profits through tree-tomato farming. Let us now explore the profits you can get through this kind of investment.

We will assume you want to plant tree tomatoes on your five-acre land.

  • 1 Acre can be planted 1200 tree-tomatoes seedlings with a spacing of 2 ½ by 2 ½ ft.
  • 1 tree yields approximately 300-800 fruits per year (this might change depending on growth factors)
  • Alternatively, 1 grafted tree-tomato yields between 20-50 kgs annual
  • 1 Grafted tree tomato seedling costs around Ksh 100
  • Sale of one fruit after maturity 5-10 kshs
  • Drip Water Irrigation 400,000 for 5 years assuming water is tapped
  • Harvesting years = 5
  • Weeding and farm preparation for the 5 years, 400,000
  • Manures & Fertilizers Ksh 300,000 (Diammonium sulphate, ammonium nitrate)
  • Controlling pests   Ksh 200,000 (diseases like Powdery mildew, tree tomato mosaic virus, aphids insets control etc)
  • Other expenses Ksh 300,000

 

For better Understanding, let us now tabulate the information.

Number of seedlings cost Labor & other Expenses Cost
 

6,000

 

600,000

Manures & Fertilizers 300,000
Weeding and Farm Preparation 400,000
Controlling Pests 200,000
Other Expenses 300,000

Lets now calculate the profits while selling one fruit @ Ksh 5

 

FIRST YEAR RETURNS

Fruit sales (5000*500*5) 7,500,000
Less Income for 10 years 1,800,000
Income for one Year 5,700,000
Income per month 475,000

You can  calculate a kilo @ Ksh 80

 

Read Also: Starting an Orchard at home isn’t As tough As you would possibly Think

NB! Throughout our research during planting and harvesting, we have noticed that not all trees yield 100% and so in the above example, we have subtracted 10-15% of the total planted seedlings in the five acres to make it 5000 that is less 1000 trees, we are assuming even if the 1000 trees would reach maturity, they won’t be as productive as the rest.

We at Oxfarm would want to be as honest as it is rather than give our farmers figures that might only appear good but do not really add up.  What we can do to our willing farmer is to inspect your land, conduct soil sampling and testing, water availability survey, land topography survey, selling our grafted tree tomatoes to you. We treat your farm like is yours by giving you free consultation and ensuring you reach the highest levels in farming.

You will realize that we have calculated on the downside by selling a fruit at 5 although the current market is at Ksh 10 and Kgs per tree per year at 30Kgs while it can go as high as 50 basically because we want our farmers to have a clear picture.

If you have any questions regarding tree tomatoes, don’t be left behind, contact us or visit our offices and we will gladly help you.

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Take Advantage Of The Long Rains And Plant Passion Fruits

The short rains are here with us once again. If you as a farmer have been thinking of becoming a great passion fruits farmer, this is the time.

Passion fruits are known to make the best juice and this makes the demand for export very high consequently making the price go high. Due to its acidity nature, passion fruit is highly recommended for juice blending. Passion fruit is commercially produced here in Kenya and is ranked third in categories of fruits exported. This is more reason farmers should establish passion fruits orchards.

There are two common species that are grown commercially in Kenya. The purple passion fruit is heavily grown in the highlands of Kenya mainly because of its flavor and aromatic taste while the yellow passion fruit is mostly grown `in the coastal region mainly for juice extraction due to its high acidity.

Now that the farmer knows where to establish the fruit farm and the two varieties that fits his location, lets learn how to make the best out of it. A light joke is made “passion fruits are like tourists”, they do well when there is enough light and sunlight. With the purple passion fruit, you can have more than three harvesting seasons and a long harvesting season for the yellow passion. This only happens if there is enough water and sunlight.

Before embarking on fruit farming, it is always right to conduct soil test and adjust if need be. Oxfarm Organic conducts soil test at very favorable prices.
I want to take you through how you establish a passion fruit orchard without much struggle and capital. I will assume you have a quarter acre of land ready to make your own orchard.

COMMON REQUIREMENTS

Requirements; you need about150-200 grafted seedlings from Oxfarm Organic Ltd. You can grow your own seedlings from seed but the disadvantages are enormous. Yellow passion fruit plants are drought resistant and are also disease resistant. So, Oxfarm organic and other modern farmers have invented a way of grafting the purple fruit with the yellow passion fruit. The purple is grafted on top of the yellow passion fruits which is used as rootstocks. Purple passion fruit is the darling of the market. One grafted seedling goes for Ksh 70 at Oxfarm Organic ltd. Since passion fruit is a climbing plant, you need two rolls of barbed wire, nails and around 240 pole to suspend the vines. The seedlings should be spaced by 3 by 3 feet and the holes filled with top soil mixed with compost manure. After all this is done and you have acquired your seedlings, it is time for transplanting.

Also Read: Hass Avocado Farmers From Central-Kenya Enjoying Export Opportunity

Passion fruit plants have deep roots and proper harrowing is necessary to ensure the roots don’t hustle with the hard pans in the soil. Your relationship with your passion fruit orchard must have commitment if you are to enjoy the fruits of the passion plant. Prune unproductive shoots and dead wood. Passion fruits tend to have whiskers like cats, called tendrils; these must be pruned to allow for free air and light penetration and reduce incidences of diseases and pest epidemics.

In four to five months if the required care is carried out, you are ready for your first harvest abnd your ¼ Acre is likely to give you 2500Kg/ha the first year and 6000kg/ha in the subsequent years. When the fields register sharp declines in the fourth and the third years, its best for the farmer to replace his fields.

Market

Passion fruits go for more than ksh 80/kg in major towns. The export market fetches further prices because it is the best. Grade one is the one that is three-quarter ripe, smooth with no bruises and of the standard size. The other grades include what is commonly found on our Kenyan markets. However, we all know the passion fruits with wrinkles are very sweet.

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Why Small-Scale Farmers Are Encouraged To Grow Fruits And Nuts

WHY SMALL-SCALE FARMERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO GROW FRUITS AND NUTS

Growing fruits and nuts provides a wide opportunity for kenyan poor families to enhance their incomes as well as improving the nutrition of the poor who currently suffer from deficiencies in vitamins, minerals and other micronutrients because of low
consumption of these foods.

Source Of Vitamins

According to World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), many fruits are, for example, important sources of vitamins A and C that are lacking in the diets of many Africans. Low intake of vitamin A – around 50 million African children are at risk of deficiency – is considered to be Africa’s third greatest public health problem after HIV/AIDS and malaria.

Vitamin C, on the other hand, is essential for protecting cells and keeping the body healthy and also absorbing iron from food. Vitamin C is an important mineral that is present in significant quantities in many fruits. Common fruits include HASS Avocado, Grafted Tree tomatoes, oranges, mangoes, grapes, tangerines e.t.c. Nuts on the other hand include MACADAMIA nuts, groundnuts, cashew nuts, e.t.c.

Impact of Fruits and Nuts Farming
Action on improving fruit and nut availability and quality, when coordinated, is likely to have a major positive impact on the health of African consumers and increase income generation.
If farmers receive good incomes from cultivating high quality fruits and nuts, that consumers can afford and are informed about the benefits of eating them, a strong domestic production sector can develop in Kenya.

 

The cultivation of fruits and nuts by smallholders to feed local markets and support of export markets presents a tremendous opportunity for investment, especially if the indigenous species that are recognized and valued by domestic consumers are considered as well as exotic ones. At present, about 80% of the total market value of fruit and nut crops is earned locally in Kenya, and this market is likely to grow further in the coming decade.

Source of Income

The total value of all traded production was estimated to be 650 million USD in Kenya in 2007, of which around 85% was contributed by fruits and 15% by nuts. Many fruit and nut species are rare assets in that they can be established on farms with a very modest initial investment and their value increases with time and is maintained over many years, continuing to contribute to family livelihoods and to bringing women, men and children out of poverty in a sustainable way.

By conserving these genetic resources in farmland – of indigenous species that are threatened in the natural landscape as forests recede, and of locally adapted exotic species – they are also made available to future generations, so that their livelihoods and health can also benefit.

Moreover, fruit and nut production is not amenable to much mechanization and is therefore labor-intensive, and thus plays to one of the key strengths of smallholders, which is their low labor cost, enabling them to compete with larger farmers.

Read Also: How to improve your fruit harvest

Production of Fruits and Nuts
Although the potential for improving fruit and nut production to improve incomes for small-scale farmers in Kenya and elsewhere in Africa is evident, smallholders face a number of bottlenecks in the cultivation and sale of produce. These include production constraints, such as limited species and variety development, inefficient delivery systems for delivering superior cultivars to farmers, and poor farm management practices,

With smallholders being unaware of better propagation, pest management and irrigation methods to improve quality, increase productivity and profits. In addition, farmers face market constraints, such as poor post-harvest practices that reduce sale ability, poor market delivery systems, lack of knowledge about the species and varieties for which markets are available, and lack of awareness among consumers of the health benefits of eating fruits and nuts.

Market Potential

Kenya has a very big market potential, since in most parts of Kenya, fruits are available throughout the year. This is a very long period and can be utilized to beat the export market. The major challenges facing the fruit marketing in Kenya are the competition from other producers such as South Africa and Israel; these can only be addressed by improving the quality of the fruits produced.

NB! If you need to grow tree fruits, Macadamia nuts or tissue banana, kindly visit our offices or contact us.

 

 

 

 

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profitable passion fruit farming in kenya

Passion fruit farming

All you need to know about passion fruits farming

Varieties to grow in Kenya

  • Purple Passion: (Passiflora edulis) …
  • Yellow Passion: – (Passiflora edulis var flavicarpa) …
  • Sweet Passion or Sweet granadilla: – (Passiflora ligularis) …
  • Giant Passion or Granilla:- (Passiflora quadrangularis) …
  • Banana Passion:- (Passiflora mollissima)

Purple varieties do better at higher altitudes areas than the yellow types which does well in warmer areas. Yellow types tend to yield higher and are more resistant to diseases.

Ecological requirement

Altitude – Passion fruits do well in a wide range of altitudes from 1,200m to 1,800m above sea level East of the Rift Valley and up to 2,000m above sea level West of the Rift valley.

Temperature – Optimum temperature for purple passion fruit is between 18oC to 25oC and 25oC to 30oC for yellow passion fruit.

Rainfall – Rainfall should be well-distributed, between 900mm to 2,000mm per year. Excess rainfall causes poor fruit set and encourages diseases mainly leaf and fruit rusts.

Soil – Passion fruits do well in a variety of soils, which should be reasonably deep and fertile with the soil pH in the range of 6.0 to 6.5. Soil which are very acidic tend to reduce the uptake of the nutrients and also accelerates Fusarium wilt disease that causes rotting of roots.

PLANTING

Preparation of planting materials.

Passion fruit can be grown from seeds but we graft to produces improved stock. Yellow passion fruit is best for production of root stock because of superior disease resistance while purple is good for fruit production.

To reduce the germination period, we soak the seeds in water for 24 hours. After 3-4 months we transplant them to a suitable place in the farm since they will act as a source of scions. We then sow the seeds of yellow passion fruit in plastic sleeves similar to those that we use for purple passion. An important distinction between the seeds of the two varieties is, Yellow passion seeds are brown in color, while those of the purple passion are black in color. Fresh seeds tend to germinate faster than older seeds therefore using them saves about 1 week.

Grafting Passion Fruit Vines

This process involves the choosing the correct rootstock and scion and identifying the most appropriate and common grafting technique is wedge grafting. Success of the graft union depends on the experience of the farmer, the choice of rootstock and scion, management practices such as watering and cleanliness of graft union.

The Rootstock

We graft yellow passion seedling when it attain a thickness of pencil since a thin, fleshy stem reduces the chances of successful graft union. Fleshy stems are prone to excessive transpiration thus leading to graft union failure. Once we select a suitable rootstock with the aforesaid qualities it is it defoliated, terminal end removed leaving a 8 cm long stem.

The Scion

We select a scion of the same thickness of a pencil from an existing purple passion plant that is healthy and free from pests and diseases. The stem must be woody enough and have 2 to 3 buds and we completely defoliate reduce its rate of respiration.

We cut the basal end into a wedge shape that is 2 cm long to allow the xylem and the phloem vessels to be in contact with those of the rootstock. We then cut a slit of about 2 cm long on the rootstock using a clean surgical blade, in which a fitting scion from purple passion is inserted and tied. The graft joint is wrapped tightly using a plastic tape to ensure no air, water or fungi goes through the joint. After 3 weeks the graft union is healed we do the hardening of the plant before it is transplanted.

TRANSPLANTING

We transplant our seedlings at the beginning of the rainy season around April-June or on any other month depending on availability of irrigation water. Passion fruit has deep roots, so soils should be well-tilled. We elect posts to a field having wire trellis to support the growing crop and fruits produced. Passion vines are planted 2m from one row to the other and 3m from one plant to the other.

The vines are usually directed so that growth is in both directions along the supporting wires. Yields are highest following a regular fertilization regime. Old or dead shoots are pruned. We also inter crop with vegetables or other annuals is to utilize free space especially when the crop is young.

Once established, the vines grow rapidly and the fruit should flower after about seven months. Ideally, young passion vines should be set in the field early in the growing season after there is no danger of drought.

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PASSION FRUITS PEST AND DISEASES CONTROL

Disease and pest management

In our farms we have had good and bad experiences when farming passion fruits. We have compiled some of the harmful pest and diseases that have led to big losses in our farms that we would like you to avoid and also have the knowledge on how to control them.

PEST

1. Mealy bugs:

These are small, oval, sucking insects with a cottony white waxy covering to their bodies. Infestation generally occurs on the tender floral buds and fruits. Adults and nymphs pierce the attack parts and suck the sap. The insect secrets a sugary substance over which a black coating develops. Such development interferes the food manufacture by the leaves and it downgrades the quality of the fruit.

2. The Passion Vine Mite

The passion mite may cause serious damage to the vines. Unless damage from these mites is checked the vines may die or the growth may be so adversely affected that there is a marked reduction in fruit. To the naked eye this mite appears as scattered, reddish patches on the lower surface of the leaves along the mid-rib and veins as well as on the fruit surface. The mites attack the young leaves and suck the sap, the affected leaves are generally curled. As a result a heavy infestation may cause complete defoliation and the plant may eventually die.

3. Fruit flies

These insect pests puncture the immature fruits while the rids are still tender. As the fruit enlarges a woody area develops around the puncture. If the fruit is still quite small and under developed, the damage may be sufficient to cause it to shrivel and fall from the vine. If the fruit is well developed, it may grow to maturity. At the time of opening, the area around the puncture has the appearance of a small woody crater which disfigures the outer appearance of the fruit but apparently does not impair the quality of the juice.

(e) Aphids

Aphids infest passion fruit and plants and suck the sap. On fully grown vines, severe damages seldom results. On seedlings, however, aphids may cause severe damage. Aphids are known to be efficient vectors of passion fruit woodiness virus, which is proving to be a serious disease of passion fruit in Kenya.

Routine Pest Control Measures

The control of pests, which attack the passion fruit, involves two basic problems,

(1) The destruction of insects which attack the plants.
(2) The preservation of the insects whose function in pollination is of vital importance to fruit plant.

The problem is complicated because both beneficial and destructive insects are so closely associated with the plant. The injurious insects must therefore be eliminated without destroying the beneficial ones. An approach to this problem is the proper timing of spray applications. Less damage to the beneficial insects, when a farmer schedules his chemical spray application during periods when the pollinating insects are not active.

We advice farmers on varius control measures to use when controlling pest in their farms.

PASSION FRUIT DISEASES

(1) Brown spot disease – Alternaria passiflorae

The disease is caused by fungus known as Alternaria pasiflorae; this is characterized by the development of brown spots and lesions on the leaves, stems and fruits.

The attacked stem normally turns brown and this leads to ring barking. As a result the functions of the plant tissues, which are responsible for carrying food from the leaves to the roots and vice versa, are interfered with and there is subsequent dieback. As the infection progress, the spots enlarge forming a series of concentric rings and the infected leaves and fruits may fall prematurely. The vines may wither from the affected parts upwards particularly after the stem has become desiccated. The quality may also shrink and drop from the vine. When the attacks are very severe, fruits begin rotting either from the stalk or from the bottom producing a brown color in the attacked parts.

The disease may infect vines of all ages. Humid conditions, accompanied by slightly higher temperatures than normal may accelerate the spread of the disease.

Control of Brown Spot Disease

(a) Field hygiene

This involves the constant removal of all infected material, which should be burnt at least once a week. The pruning frequency should also be increased during humid periods when the disease appears to spread very rapidly.

(b) Chemical control

Besides keeping the cines reasonably exposed to the sun by judicious pruning, regular spraying is very necessary to reduce losses where the disease is prevalent.

Related Post: Why Hass Avocado is the new Cash Crop

(2) Woodiness disease

Virus causes the disease. The infection is characterized by grossly misshapen fruits, which show abnormal thickening and hardening of the tissues of the fruit wall and a reduced pulp cavity. The foliage becomes mottled with dark green areas localized on the raised portions of the leaves. The leaf color between dark green and the raised areas is yellow green (mosaic appearance). The leaves are frequently misshapen and reduced in size. In some instances there is lack of growth of the terminal shoot accompanied by a bunchiness of the harsch-textured terminal leaves. The disease is one of the most serious diseases of passion fruit and may curtail the commercial life of a vineyard. Aphids spread the virus, by at the transfer of sap from diseased to healthy plants during pruning and other cultural operations.

Control Measures

Fungal sprays cannot control woodiness, it is therefore recommended that plants showing typical symptoms of the disease be uprooted and burnt. Also ensure you get seedlings that are certified to avoid this disease. Plant hygiene measures should be practiced, especially during training and pruning. Pruning knives should be sterilized by use of appropriate disinfectant, both before and after use. Passion fruits should never be planted again in the same field or in the immediate vicinity particularly where a severe attack has occurred.

3. Fusariam Wilt

Fusariam wilt is serious disease in Passion fruit particularly the local purple passion fruit. The disease is soil borne, which means that the fungus lives in the soil from where it attacks the rooting system of the affected plant. The disease spreads upwards along the stem and one can easily recognize brown patches scattered on the stem. The brown patches can easily be mistaken for the brown spot disease and can only be diagnosed by an experienced person. Since the attack originates from the roots the transaction of water and minerals from the soil are interfered with, the plant starts to wither and eventually it dies.

Control Measure

There is no control of this disease once it attacks the plant. A farmer should uproot and burn it and never again to plant that passion fruit which is very susceptible to this disease on the same soil. We use the  Yellow passion fruit which is resistant to this disease, which is used as a rootstock against this disease.

 

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Grafted purple passion fruits kenya

Grafted purple passion

Why you should think of investing on grafted purple passion fruit. The fruits matures after 6 months. One vine of grafted passion fruit plant can produce a minimum of 50kg or estimated 1500-2500 fruits in one year. One acre can be planted 650-1000 plants seedlings. They have a lifespan of more than 3-5 years. Purple passions have ready market and the current market price per kg at the farm gate is sh 70-100. The grafted ones are recommended because they are resistant to fusariam wilt  a disease present in the soil. Order seedlings from us at sh 70 each. We also do planting and management practices for our clients at an agreed fee. Delivery services available country wide. Visit our offices at Hermes house ,1st floor,opposite KTDA Tom mboya street. contact us for more info