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How can farmers In Kenya Increase Their Profit Margin?

Tomato Farmers in Kenya

Farming is not just farming but a business as well. We have realized that increasing profit margin from farming uses similar strategies as other industries across the country. Farmers look to maximize labor, reduce spending and maximize revenue so the business can retain as much profit as possible. Short of simply raising prices, there are a number of strategies farmers can employ to increase profit margin without sacrificing the quality of products brought to the market.

Selling to Local Businesses

Selling to local community markets and grocery stores can help a farmer decrease transportation costs for products and increase profit margin. A farmer selling farm produce to local grocery stores and markets doesn’t have to hire transportation to reach delivery destinations that are far, which cuts down on fuel costs and strain on delivery equipment. A farmer also reduces payroll by having shorter delivery routes for drivers. Local grocery stores prize produce from local growers because of the increasing number of consumers looking to reduce carbon footprint through the purchase of locally grown products.

How to earn a living from Watermelon farming in Kenya

Investing in Alternative Energy

Investing in alternative energy solutions, including solar power, can allow a farmer to reduce energy costs and increase profit. Solar power can provide a cheaper form of energy to power farm equipment than conventionally generated electricity.

Crop Rotation Habits

Proper crop rotation strategies can help reduce a farmer’s fertilizer costs, enrich the soil, and increase take-home earnings. For example, planting beans when maize isn’t in season increases nitrogen content in the soil. These strategies can also help kill off harmful insects and retard the growth of harmful bacteria. Integrated Pest Management,  can help a farmer operating on a small or large scale to bring a greater percentage of produce and other food products to market. The increased yield, combined with healthier soil, allows a farmer to retain a greater percentage of his revenue as profit.

Improving Farm Equipment

Purchasing more efficient farm equipment, including tractors, harvesters and grain separators, can help reduce a farmer’s equipment costs in the long run and lead to increased profits. A farmer incurs increased costs up front to purchase more energy-efficient equipment, but the savings the farmer receives in reduced fuel and maintenance costs over time can outpace those up-front expenditures. Purchasing new capital assets expected to earn income for the farm also allows a farmer to recoup these expenditures over a number of years through depreciation. This ensures the farmer has eligible tax deductions over the useful lives of these items.

Farmers Should Boost irrigation

With the growing effects of climate change on weather patterns, more irrigation will be needed. Average yields in irrigated farms are 90% higher than those of nearby rain-fed farms.

Increase the use of fertilizers

As soil fertility deteriorates, fertilizer use must increase. Kenyan National in collaboration with local governments need to ensure the right type of fertilizers are available at the right price, and at the right times. Fertilizer education lessens the environmental impact and an analysis of such training programs in Kenya found they boosted average incomes by 61%.

Improve market access, regulations, and governance

Improving rural infrastructure such as roads is crucial to raising productivity through reductions in shipping costs and the loss of perishable produce. Meanwhile, providing better incentives to farmers, including reductions in food subsidies, could raise agricultural output by nearly 5%.

Make better use of information technology

Information technology can support better crop, fertilizer and pesticide selection. It also improves land and water management, provides access to weather information, and connects farmers to sources of credit. Simply giving farmers information about crop prices in different markets has increased their bargaining power.

 

For more information, keep visiting our website.

 

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What Causes Tomatoes To Split And How do you Prevent Tomato Cracking

Tomato farming in Kenya is a common practice among many farmers. This is because everyone loves tomatoes. They are great in cooking, salads and sauces and even make a great gift. However, with these beautiful and tasty beauties comes a problem. Sometimes, right in the middle of thinking everything is alright with your tomatoes, you will find splitting tomatoes or tomato cracking. Farmers in Kenya have made losses through tomato cracking and we want to help you prevent it.

How To Establish An Arrow Root Farm

 What causes tomatoes to split?

Fluctuation of temperatures sometimes can cause problems for newly growing tomato transplants. It is therefore very crucial to mulch your plants, either with organic mulch such as straws, wood chips or plastic. The mulch will conserve water and also prevent disease from spreading. When it comes to mulch and tomatoes, plastic mulch has shown to be the best mulch to help prevent tomato cracking. Sometimes, if you have a lot of rain after a spell of really dry weather, you’ll find splitting tomatoes on your tomato plants. A split tomato problem is really caused by lack of water. If you take away water, the tomatoes cannot stay lush and juicy, and the skin will crack just as your skin cracks if you do not have enough moisture. And when the tomatoes receive a large amount of water quickly after this, they fill with water and the skin bursts at the cracks like an overfilled water balloon.

Here Are The Things To Consider When Establishing Drip Irrigation In Your Farm

How to Prevent Tomato Cracking

This cracking problem in tomato is more than just an aesthetic problem. You will realize that through these cracks bacteria and fungus can be introduced into the fruit and cause them to rot or provide an easy access to pests. For you to prevent splitting in tomatoes, you will have to water your tomato plants once a week with about 1-2 inches of water. To keep tomato cracking to a minimum, be sure to keep your tomato plants watered evenly on a regular basis. Protect them from a severe drought in your absence by setting up a watering system on a timer. This way you can water your farm when you aren’t home to do it and you won’t have to deal with severe tomato cracking. It’s as easy as that to solve a split tomato problem. Finally, be sure to fertilize your tomatoes according to the instructions on your tomato fertilizer. Fertilizer or manure is important to keep the soil healthy enough to help your plants produce as many tomatoes as possible. If you follow these rules, soon enough you will have plenty of unsplit tomatoes to enjoy and to sell.

 

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How to control various soil diseases in our farms

Fighting soil diseases in our shamba can be a nightmare at times. With our tips, you can learn how to detect problems early and keep them out of your shamba.

Just like any other living organism, soil is susceptible to viruses, harmful fungi and bad bacteria, particularly when its out of balance. If in any case the soil in your farm is infected by the diseases below, your entire crops might be affected and it might also be very hard to fight them. The most important thing in keeping your soil and crops healthy is through protection and prevention. You can also use the tips below to detect and prevent diseases even if your farm doesn’t have them currently.

Soil diseases: Damping-Off

Soil diseases
Plants affected by Damping off soil disease

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Its a fungus disease that mostly affects spinach, beets, low-growing seedlings, , chard, and lettuce. Damping-off typically attacks young plants, but can also affect germinating seeds, preventing germination from happening at all.

To prevent it, try Growing in high-quality soil with good drainage as it is one of the best way to prevent damping-off. As for seedlings, thin young plants to create better airflow, and don’t over water. Consider planting into sterilized soil or companion planting with garlic and chamomile, which have been known to help reduce the fungus. Once you have damping-off, lighten up on watering, preferably using a mister. Thin young plants and move them to a warmer area to encourage more rapid seed growth.

Read: Improving banana farming in Kenya through Value Addition

Soil Diseases: Verticillium Wilt

It’s a type of fungus. Crops affected include strawberries, potatoes, peppers, tomatoes and eggplant. Symptoms include leaves wilting and dying, typically from the soil upward.

To prevent it you can purchase wilt-resistant seeds, but also check any plants you buy for wilt, and never transplant a wilting plant into your garden. Verticillium wilt is very difficult to get rid of, though healthy, well drained soil will help. Soil polarization has been shown to reduce occurrences.

Soil Diseases: Downy Mildew

Downy mildew is caused by fungus. Affected crops include squash, cucumbers and other cucurbits; basil; grapes. Its symptoms may include; tiny yellow spots appear on leaves in early to late summer, killing the leaf canopy and making the fruit vulnerable to sun scorch.

How to Prevent It: Buy seeds resistant to downy mildew, and if irrigating, irrigate from below to keep the leaves as dry as possible. Rotate crop families every season, and cover the transplanted crops with row cover if you’ve experienced downy mildew in the past. There has been some success ridding downy mildew with bio-fungicides. We recommend farmers to dilute solution of copper spray to reduce the spread of the disease.

Soil Diseases: Powdery Mildew

Its caused by fungus. Crops Affected may include, squash, cucumbers and other cucurbits; roses; grapes.

Symptoms: Yellowish spots appear on the top of leaves and purple spots appear below, most commonly in warm, wet weather.

To prevent it, as with downy mildew, buy resistant seeds and irrigate from below to prevent creating a culture where powdery mildew can thrive. Row cover can help prevent bugs from transferring disease from plant to plant. Rotate crops each season.

This disease spreads easily among plants, so consider tearing out any affected plants and throwing them away. (Do not compost to avoid risk of spreading the disease.) Early applications of milk spray has also been shown to help prevent powdery mildew.

Soil Diseases: Bacterial Wilt

Its caused by a bacteria. The Crops Affected may include passion fruits, cucurbits, especially muskmelons and cucumbers. Symptoms include leaves wilting on the stems.To prevent it you can grow cultivars that are resistant to this wilt, but the best prevention is using row cover to keep cucumber beetles and other bugs from transmitting the disease.

There is no easy way to get rid of bacterial wilt. If you see the infection, remove the plants from your garden, especially passion fruits.

Soil Diseases: Foliar Nematodes

Affected Crops may include strawberries; ornamental crops, including asters, primrose, violets, ferns and dahlias. Symptoms might include yellow patches appear on leaves and may turn brown or black. Shoots may also become stunted and produce deformed flowers.To prevent it, Plant resistant cultivars, and always plant in well-drained soil with good air circulation. Clean up plant debris every season. Irrigate from beneath the plant if possible. How to Get Rid Of It: Destroy any affected parts of the plant. Thin plants if possible for better air circulation.

Read: 8 types of agribusiness ideas to think about in 2018

Soil Diseases: Root Knot Nematodes

soil deseases
Carrot affected by Rot Knot Nematodes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s a nematode disease which affects thousands of crops , including corn, tomatoes, lettuce and potatoes. Its symptoms include wilting or yellowing plants; stunted fruits and flowers. To prevent root Knot nematodes plant resistant varieties when available. Marigolds, used as a cover crop and tilled into the soil at the end of the season, have been shown to help prevent the disease. Healthy soil full of organic matter will likewise help crowd out the nematodes.

Neem oil has been shown to help rid a garden of nematodes, though they are difficult to eradicate in the current season. Add compost and organic matter to soil at the end of the season to improve soil quality for the next year.

Soil Diseases: Bacterial Soft Rot

Its caused by bacteria. The affected crops include corn, potatoes, tomatoes, beans, carrots, sweet potatoes and onions. Bacterial soft rot primarily attacks tubers, rhizomes, bulbs and corms, creating black spots, yellow spots, a rancid odor and rot. It can also affect already harvested crops, including potatoes and carrots. To prevent it, plant in well-drained soils with good circulation. Keep areas around the garden, storage houses and greenhouse free of plant debris. There are no known remedies to get rid of it. Dispose of affected plants, and do not bury or compost.

Read: Reasons Why You Should Start an Agribusiness in Kenya Today

Soil diseases: Mosaic Virus

Its kind of a virus that affects potatoes, squash, tomatoes, cucumbers. This disease can affect both the leaves and fruit, appearing often as leaves with mottled yellow patches or stunted growth of the fruit with both green and yellow spots. To prevent it find mosaic-virus-resistant seeds, and shielding the plants with row cover helps prevent bugs from bringing the disease. In addition, always rotate crops. For you to get rid of it, tear up the plants and throw them away. Mosaic virus is highly contagious and can destroy a crop and spread to others.

Read: How Many Years Will It Take To Get Returns On Invested Capital Under Hass Avocado Farming

Soil Diseases: Scab

Its type of a fungus that affects mostly tuber crops such as such as potatoes, beets and radishes. This disease doesn’t usually affect the yield of a crop, but can blemish crops with small, rough, corky spots making them unsuitable for sale. To prevent it, lowering the soil pH to below 5.2 can help reduce the chances of scab. Purchase disease-free seed when available.

Because scab is generally discovered upon harvest, it’s hard to detect. Keep soil evenly moist and rotate crops every season to avoid the fungus.

Thank you for finding time to read this article. For more information about farming and how to control pests and diseases kindly contact us.

 

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Ultimate guide for beans farming in Kenya

Beans farming in Kenya is not as common as maize. However, it is one of the common grown crops in Kenya. In fact, it is often inter-cropped with the main crop for maximum absorption of nutrients by both plants. Our guide will help interested parties, both farmers and traders to have a clear mind on beans farming and how they can get money as far as beans are concerned.

Varieties of beans grown in Kenya

Beans popularity in Kenya may be due to the fact that bean recipes are numerous and beans are consumed almost with everything and contain quite a considerable amount of protein. Before venturing into beans farming, it is advisable to look at the different varieties available. If a farmer knows the different types of beans he will be able to choose the best based on its performance. Below are the several varieties;

  • Rosecoco beans Kenya
  • Mwezi moja beans
  • Chelalang beans
  • Mwitemania beans
  • Yellow beans

Do your research well as a farmer and identify which variety does well in your area and guarantees high yields.

Read: Some of the best fruits to grow in Kenya

Yield per Acre of Beans

The hybrid varieties nowadays are very impressive and has a high yield compared to the traditional varieties. Most of the improved varieties produce about 20 pods for each plant, which translate to about 25, 90 kg bags per acre. Notably, this crop is high yielding when all the conditions are optimal.

Dry beans market

Beans are source of proteins which makes Kenya depend highly on them. The market for beans is overwhelming, both locally and international. Depending on quality and type of beans, the prices per 90 kg bag of beans ranges between Ksh 7,000 and Ksh 12,000. Particularly, beans fetch better prices when it is not harvesting period. Some varieties are also more expensive than others. The rose coco and kidney beans, for instance, are a bit pricey compared to the other varieties which are available in large quantities. Beans with a high supply across the country will fetch a lower price compared to those that thrive in specific areas. Irrespective of the type of beans, the market for beans is always there and since it’s a grain, you can store it and sell when the prices are high.

Price of beans in Kenya

Just like any other agricultural product, prices for beans fluctuate depending on a number of factors including demand and supply. The crop will tend to be expensive when they are in high demand, which is often around planting time when farmers need seeds for planting, and also during periods with no new crops. The cost may also depend on the region you are in and when you are buying or selling. So different areas in Kenya register varying prices of beans. Averagely, beans prices in Kenya range from Kshs. 7,000 to Kshs. 12,000 in major towns of

Kenya from low to high seasons. The best thing to do when scouting for better rates is to check the indices often provided by trading companies and the government on the prices of beans in major towns including Eldoret, Nakuru, Kisumu, Nairobi, and Mombasa. It is not surprising that each town could register a different price for the same variety of beans. This is because different factors play out when determining the prices.

Read: Why you should have a working business plan for you to succeed in commercial maize farming

Beans production

It is always good to have a projection before embarking on planting the crop. This is where you consider farming as a business and have a clear business plan. You will need to have a structured plan on what to expect through the farming period and how to counter different eventualities. Your projections against the real data will give a vivid picture of whether or not to proceed with the venture. Apart from this, knowing exactly what to do is necessary. Below are some tips that might help you with your business plan;

  • Know the appropriate beans planting season in Kenya
  • Choose the best beans varieties in your area
  • Consider ideal ecological requirements – This includes temperatures of about 20 to 25 degrees, altitude of between 1,000 m to 2,100 m above sea level, rainfall of between 900 mm to 1,200 mm per year and a soil pH of 6.5 to 7.5

Although the market for beans is always there and appealing, beans farming is not an easy task especially if you are to do it commercially. However, it is always possible to register good yields if you do it right and follow the above steps. You also need to have achievable goals.

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Profitable chilli farming in Kenya

Farming in Kenya has picked in the best way we could have all imagined. Even with chilli farming one can make un imaginable profits. Chilies have great nutritional value since they can be source of vitamin C, Vitamin A, Vitamin B, iron, potassium and magnesium. The capsaicin in them contain anti-bacterial, anti-diabetic, anti-carcinogenic and analgesic properties. They also help to reduce cholesterol levels in the body, aid in digestion, help relieve migraines, muscle and joint pain.

Given the tropical climatic conditions of Kenya, chilies farming is ideal, and the warmer the growing conditions the hotter the chili.

Read: How to quit your job, move to your farm and start making sane money

How to Make money Through Chilli Farming

Chilies should be farmed in an area where they get enough sunlight, where the temperatures don’t get below 150C.

Cultivars

The varieties of Kenyan chillies represent some of the hottest of them; Cayenne Pepper, Bird Eye, Jalapeno, Serenade, habareno and more.

Chili Farming: Ecological requirements

  • The crop can grow at elevations from sea level to 1500m above sea level
  • The crop thrives in areas with medium rainfall about 600-1,200mm per annum.
  • Excess rain can causes leaf shedding and cause rotting
  • Extreme water deficits can stunt growth and cause flower abortion and fruit drops hence irrigation is recommended where rainfall is insufficient.
  • Chilies are warm seasoned crops hence sensitive to frost. The optimum temperatures for growth and fruit set are 20-300C.
  • Night temperatures below 16oC and day temperature above 320C can however prevent/reduce fruits set.
  • Low humidity and high temperatures cause abscission of buds, flower and fruit.
  • Light loamy, non-acidic, well drained soils are ideal for capsicum growth but with proper soil management, chili can grow in a wide range of soil types. Soil pH of 4.3-9.7 is well tolerated. However the optimum is pH is 6.0-6.5.

Read: I Have Been a Good Farmer Why Aren’t I Successful Yet?

Chili Farming: Planning Production

  • Production should be done in collaboration with the buyer so that the produce can be collected immediately after drying
  • Get certified seeds from a recommended source.
  • The size of farm should be determined by the labour available especially during harvesting.

Chilli Farming: Fertilizer application

  • Application of up to 10 tons/ha of Farm Yard Manure or compost is recommended depending on soil organic matter content (2 handfuls per planting hole).
  • 250 kg/ha TSP or DAP may be applied during transplanting.  Top-dress with 100 kg/ha CAN when plants are about 15 cm and later with 200 kg/ha CAN after 4 weeks.

Chilli Farming: Harvesting

  • The fruits are ready for first picking between 2 1/2 to 3 months after transplanting.
  • Picking continues for 3 to 4 months and it is recommended to harvest all the red ripe chilies as soon as they appear.
  • Harvesting can be done once or twice a week.
  • Harvest mature, deep red fruits only of length not more than 2 cm. Chilies should be picked without stalks.
  • Damaged, overripe, or green chilies should not be taken to the dryer.
  • The fruit should be picked early in the day after dew evaporates from the plant.
    Note
  • It is far more profitable to harvest all the fruit from a few plants than half of the fruit from many plants.

Chilli Farming: Yield

  • Depending on management yields of 1,000 kg to 3,000 kg per acre can be achieved.
  • Well-managed farms should be able to yield at least 600 grams of fresh chili per plant per year or 200 grams of dried chili.
  • A well maintained crop should produce up to 3 tons of chili per acre.

Chilli Farming: Challenges in production

  • Harvesting is the most labour intensive activity in chilli production. This has been a deterrent to large scale production of chili.
  • It is advisable not to plant more bushes than you can easily harvest.

Read: Cost and returns of establishing successful dairy farm

Chilli Farming: Advice to potential growers

  • The market demands top quality and consistent product. Drying and grading operations needs to be maintained at high standards.
  • Start on a small scale and expand production as you get experienced.
  • It is important to plan production with the Buyer in order to ensure timely delivery of the produce after drying.

 

 

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What Is the Difference Between Agriculture And Agribusiness?

Agriculture involves the cultivation of crops and the raising of livestock for food, the most basic of human needs. The first ecologists, farmers, understood the interaction of soil, water, grasses and trees; they understood the need to work with nature to produce sufficiency or abundance, and to try to avert scarcity in times of drought or pestilence. Agriculture dictated the survival and development of societies, and security in food allowed the growth of modern industrial states.

In today’s interdependent and technological world of global markets and distribution systems, agriculture has become an essential element of national and international economies. Food is a commodity for trade, and food security is a matter of global concern. The future security of the world’s food supply has focused international discussion on one over-arching question: Can agricultural systems meet the demands of a rising world population and expanded expectations on the one hand, and deal with the deterioration of land and soil resources on the other?

Read: How youth you can succeed in farming

Many scientists today believe that modern agricultural practices, which have increased efficiency and production to an extent unknown in history, now appear to be exhausting the agricultural ecosystem. A movement towards more sustainable agricultural practices has begun. On the other hand, agribusinesses point to new science and technology based on genetic engineering and other methods that may revolutionize the food industry.

Kenya, rich in resources, has always been a major exporter of food. Kenyans, like other societies, have seen farmlands and farm communities as part of their environmental heritage, national identity and culture. But in today’s world of supermarkets, fast foods and freezer containers, where food is available to all who can afford it, many urbanized Kenyans have lost the connection between the food they eat and the land that produces it, not recognizing the profound changes that agribusiness has brought to farming communities, the farming way of life and the environment.

In recent years, concerns about pesticide use, biotechnology and other issues have focused public attention on the quality and safety of food and industrial farming techniques, and spurred interest in alternatives. Resolving issues regarding the sustainability of Kenyan agriculture will involve a new recognition of the integrity of nature and ecosystems and the wisdom of farming methods in harmony with the local environment, while at the same time utilizing the best national and international science and technology to maintain food security levels and meet the challenge of rising populations and deteriorating land and soil resources.

Read: Should I quit my job and start farming?

Players of Agribusiness in Kenya

From Sugarcane farming in the western region to tea farming in the Western Kenya region, livestock keeping in northern Kenya, maize farming in the north rift and fishing in the Indian Ocean, smallholder producers face more or less the same hurdles to wealth creation. The good news is that opportunities exist to make farming, including the small-scale types, a profitable venture for anyone. One of the ways of bringing shine to the much-neglected sector is by adopting sustainable agribusiness.

Agribusiness is a broad area and covers the entire spectrum of food production with multiple players along the value chain. It includes farming, the supply of various inputs, distribution, processing, wholesale and retail sales, research and development, marketing and financing as well as the end product: the food on the plate of the consumer.

The key players in the value chain include the farmers, co-operatives, regulators, government agencies, research institutions, companies, business associations, financial institutions, multilateral bodies, civil society, and the academia.

Sustainable agriculture is not singularly fixated on the profit motive. It considers the socio-economic, environmental and cultural impacts of various activities along the value chain. It supports the local economy through knowledge transfer, job creation, supporting local enterprises and ensuring food safety and security.

The academia can play a crucial role in promoting sustainable agribusiness through carrying out research on new ways of doing agriculture such as better and eco-friendly ways of increasing the soil fertility, increasing animal produce, among other things.

There are various businesses that do a lot with regard to promoting sustainable and inclusive agriculture. There is also a need for improvement in infrastructure, climate change mitigation and adaptation, research and extension, value addition and skills upgrading.

As long as funding remains limited or is diverted by officials, farming will remain unattractive and farmers will continue to suffer in spite of their toil. Lack of trust across the value chain is another issue with many farmers perceiving middlemen as exploiters. The other key aspect is the imbalance of trade between Kenya and its trading partners. Take for instance, coffee and tea which are grossly under-priced with farmers barely meeting the cost of their investment.

Yet the same commodities fetch better prices once they leave the farmers’ hands. The widespread failure to add value to farmers’ produce denies producers the opportunity to earn the true value of their produce. It also denies local entrepreneurs and budding industrialists the opportunity to grow new lines of business and create jobs for many jobless Kenyans. Value addition requires policy intervention through a favorable tax regime, lower cost of power, improved infrastructure and government commitment to find markets outside its borders.

Read: I don’t have capital to start my agribusiness venture how do I start from scratch?

Kenyan farmers and especially the youths are urged to indulge in farming and more specifically agribusiness. Do it for fun and money!

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How Do I Monetize My Passion On Farming?

Farming is a business and so farmers must treat it as such. This starts with proper planning and diligent execution of all on-farm and off-farm activities. If you intend to make farming your business then keeping records is a very important activity to note. Tracking your income and expenditure, weather trends, the efficacy of applications and treatments on the farm, efficiencies of various technologies, amongst others, can determine your success or otherwise in farming. You cannot ignore records keeping from your daily chores on the farm.

Below are some of the tips that you can use to monetize your passion in farming.

Have A Long-Term Vision

If you have decided to be a farmer for a very long time, then it is always nice to have a clear long-term vision. A vision, as in any business, will be your long-term guide and motivation. Whenever you pause to ponder over your farms, your vision is what you weigh against progress to see if you are on the path to achieving what you envision. Altogether, your records will be a vital guide.

Set Clear Goals for Your Farms

Now, break long-term vision into short-term goals. Do not be too ambitious. Keeping records of various activities will help you track progress. Make sure the goals you set are in line with your vision and set up activities that can address the goals. Think of your resources and which farming enterprise to start with, in which season. Decide how to use your capital and how you intend to generate profit. With your knowledge of records keeping, you will steadily get to your vision.

Track Money Coming in And Going Out of The Farm

It is very critical for farmers to track their income and expenditure. Keep all your invoices, receipts and all documents relating to income and expenditure on your farm. Moreover, keep a journal to record all the monies spent especially on labour. Where there are more than one enterprise, you may keep records separately to be able to track progress on individual enterprises. Do not forget to record dates of various transactions. Your records will inform you, which months have the highest demands for money.

Learn From Your Data

The records you have kept will be your greatest tool moving forward to achieving your goals and ultimately your vision. From the records, you can compare the cost of inputs and their efficacies. Moreover, you can know from the data if you are truly making a profit. The data should be able to give you all the vital information you need, to make all the necessary changes or improvements. If you do not find any information you want, that in itself is enough information to know what to add to your records the next time around.

Calculate Your Own Labor Time and Where To Use It

Most farmers think that their own labor used on the farms are worth no money. However, keeping records of your own labor will help you know how to distribute it to maximize profit. Costing your labor will give you the true picture of the actual cost of production in a particular enterprise. Data on your labor will help you decide when or if you need to hire. Besides, it helps to take up other responsibilities in your farming enterprise.

Make Use of Available Resources

You do not need to be good at math or an expert accountant to keep good records. In fact, there are lots of resources available that you can use. You can dwell on your personal experience or that of other farmers. Furthermore, you can seek the help of an Extension officers from the nearest County Government’s offices.

Develop Successful Habits

Keeping good farm records is obviously one of the key habits you need to develop, as well as a focus. With a focus on the set goals and vision, you are always bent on learning from the data and improving. Develop the habit of organizing your records very well and making your future plans for them. Set times to look at your books. Either weekly, monthly or quarterly. This will help you concentrate on other activities and make an evaluation of your data at other times at specific intervals.

Doubled with your passion in farming, if you do the above, well we guarantee you success in farming. Make it an agribusiness and not just farming.