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Water storage can help farmers during dry seasons

water storage

Farmers in Kenya are at times hindered from daily activities due to lack of enough water. However, with Kenya being well geographically placed with quite some rain during the season, Kenyans can store water and use it when it is dry.

Kenya’s per capita water is less than 600 cubic metres, which is below the global threshold of 1,000, making it one of the chronically water-scarce nations. Kenya’s water problem is, thought-provoking: if millions are not threatened by severe drought, they are fighting to remain afloat amid raging floods. Water scarcity is one of the major challenges to sustainable food production the world over, and climate change experts warn that it will only get worse as the world’s population continues rising. But local farmers can alleviate this situation by investing in water harvesting technologies and irrigation.

In Kenya, reservoirs and rock pools are common water storage facilities in homes or farms. A number of people use these methods of water storage to either harvest or store water which is often used either in normal home operations or in farms.

The urge to ensure there is adequate water that can push families into cluttering the garden with many unsightly tanks. Although the sight of one or two overhead tanks in the garden can be forgiven, it’s important to find a better way to place the water storage systems in the compound without interfering with the landscaping of the surrounding farm.

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Ways Of Storing Water

There are a number of options that you can explore to ensure you collect and store water depending on the space available and the water requirement for one’s home or farm. For instance, a home with high dependency on rain water due to perennial water shortage may deem it necessary to have several huge underground tanks. On the other hand, a small family may only settle for an overhead tank with a capacity of 10,000 litres, rather than digging a dam or building a rock pool in their property.

The type of water storage system can only be settled on after the family has identified its water needs. This helps one know the capacity of water storage facility needed. After which, one can choose among the available options.

However, an underground tank is one of the best choices for individuals keen on maintaining a proper manicured garden in their compound. The tank is concealed below the garden surface and is constructed using concrete. Drainage systems are put in place to trap water and guide it to the tank below. Underground tanks are often used by people practicing rain water harvesting.

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After constructing the tank, grass and trees are grown on the surface, to give the garden a flawless look.  Other than concrete, bricks can also be used to construct the underground tank that can be as big as one may wish. In case you are not sure about how to go about it, get help from experts on rain water harvesting. Landscapers can also assist homeowners to design the garden, as well as recommend the best trees or plants to be grown on the surface.

Water tanks can be camouflaged by either being placed on a tower that is raised above the ground. If it’s not too high up, it can have creeping plants grown around the tank or made to resemble the garden pattern or design.

A water tank with a pattern similar to the garden layout or landscape is creative and attractive. It’s pleasant to the eye and adds value to the garden. The design can be done according to one’s taste and preference.

It is paramount to increase investment in terms of water storage techniques, including storing groundwater during wet season, harvesting rainwater and conserving soil moisture through storing water in the ground.

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Here Are The Things To Consider When Establishing Drip Irrigation In Your Farm

Drip irrigation can boost crop production by way of more than 30% at the same time as the use of 30 to 50% much less water than a sprinkler. It can also save you defects in fruits and greens while saving you time. Right here are our 5 concerns for planning a drip irrigation system for huge-scale or small market farmers.

  • Determine the quality of your water supply for your drip irrigation. Factors can also include such things as pond water source that will require installation of a filtering machine or an adjustment of the water PH, depending on your plants. Familiarize yourself with the elevation of the plot/field you plan to irrigate, as it will determine how you size the system and adjust water flow. A 2.3-foot change in elevation, for instance, results in a gain of 1 pound of water pressure going downhill, or loss of 1 pound of pressure going uphill, requiring pressure compensation within the system on steep slopes. Topography, water flow rate and distance also will affect the size of pipes you’ll need.

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  • Will you automate your drip system? Depending on the complexity and size of the system, you may need to split watering times between different zones to water spaces incrementally, based on the output of your pump or the water needs of different crops. Automation ensures consistency in soil moisture and in flow, versus turning the water on and off at irregular intervals. The latter is important if you use the drip system to fertilize.
  • Think ahead. As plants mature, they require more water, which is especially important if you are irrigating perennial fruit crops. Build the system with the capacity to supply the optimum amount of water plants will need at maturity. If your irrigation water comes from the same well your home uses, the pressure tank may need to be upsized to reduce pump cycling and possible pump burnout. Or, you can irrigate at night when family water use is minimal.
  • Permit for expansion whilst putting in your device. For systems 1 and1/2 acre or larger, scaling for expansion up front will save money, as completely mounted pipes need to be buried underneath the frost line and the value of trenching in pipelines is high-priced. Customize your pipes to accommodate expansion as you increase your operations. Doubling the pipe diameter will quadruple the ability water float rate.

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Drip irrigation is not a set-and-neglect-it solution. Systems need to be checked each day as emitters might also plug and rodents may additionally cause damage. The system additionally need to be drained to winterize it.

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When to Use Sprinkler Irrigation

Sprinkler Irrigation is a way for applying irrigation water which is like precipitation. Water is conveyed through a system of pipes for the most part by pumping. It is then showered into the air and irrigated into the whole soil surface through splash heads with the goal that it separates into little water drops which fall to the ground.

Sprinklers provide effective coverage from small to large-scale regions and are best suit for use on a wide range of properties. It is also versatile to about every single irrigable soil since sprinklers are accessible in an extensive variety of discharge limit.

Best Suited Crops

Sprinkler water system is suited for most row, field and tree crops and water can be splashed over or under the harvest shade. In any case, substantial sprinklers are not prescribed for water system of fragile yields, for example, lettuce in light of the fact that the extensive water drops delivered by the sprinklers may harm the product.

Appropriate slants

Sprinkler water system is versatile to any farmable incline, regardless of whether uniform or undulating. The parallel channels providing water to the sprinklers ought to dependably be laid out along the land shape at whatever point conceivable. This will limit the weight changes at the sprinklers and give a uniform water system.

 

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Suitable soils

Sprinklers are best suited to sandy soils with high infiltration rates although they are adaptable to most soils. The average application rate from the sprinklers (in mm/hour) is always chosen to be less than the basic infiltration rate of the soil so that surface ponding and runoff can be avoided.

Sprinklers are not suitable for soils which easily form a crust. If sprinkler irrigation is the only method available, then light fine sprays should be used. The larger sprinklers producing larger water droplets are to be avoided.

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Suitable irrigation water

A decent clean supply of water, free of suspended sediments, is required to keep away from issues of sprinkler spout blockage and ruining the product by covering it with residue.