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Video; Should you involve us, this is what to expect – Oxfarm packages

 

There is a huge demand of fruits as more people are becoming healthy conscious, There is increased population driving the demand of food higher, Due to numerous challenges while farming traditional crops like Maize and other cash crops like coffee and tea, the trend favors fruit tree farming.

There is also a decline in major fruit producing countries in southern hemisphere like Mexico and South Africa due to climate change which is favoring countries in tropics like Kenya.

Due to enhanced bilateral trade between Kenya and other countries like China and US the demand will continue to rise due to enhanced ease of doing business and exports.

 

We as OxfarmAg ltd we assist in farm orchard establishment for various types of fruit trees.

Through our research, we have realized that most farmers do not have required expertise to go about fruit tree farming and they make they make costly mistakes while establishing their orchards.

This has caused many customers huge losses, of trial and error.

As OxfarmAg ltd we assist in giving valuable information, establishment of the orchards and marketing of the produce on the behalf of the farmer.

 

Here are some of discounted prices of various fruit tree farming.

These discounted cost are for August 2019 only.

Book now Here by submitting your details.

 

Check below on the cost of various fruit tree farming packages.

Hass Avocado Package

APPLE FARMING PACKAGE

 

MACADAMIA FARMING PACKAGE

 

MANGOES FARMING PACKAGE

 

ORANGES/TANGERINES FARMING PACKAGE

 

PIXIE ORANGE FARMING PACKAGE

 

POMEGRANATE FARMING PACKAGE

 

LIME FARMING PACKAGE

 

LEMONS FARMING PACKAGE

 

GRAPES FARMING PACKAGE

 

 

CONTACT US AND BOOK TODAY.

Discount ends on 31st August 2019.
+254706222888

WhatsApp link HERE
or info@Oxfarm.co.ke

Check our Catalogue or download on this link.

Oxfarm Catalogue discounted prices pdf

 

 

 

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Diseases and Pests That Affect Oranges

Oranges are round citrus fruits with finely-textured skins that are, of course, orange in color just like their pulpy flesh; the skin can vary in thickness from very thin to very thick. Oranges usually range from approximately two to three inches in diameter.

Diseases in Oranges

  1. greasy spot in oranges

    Greasy spot.

It’s a fungal disease.

Symptoms

Yellowish-brownish blister spots on leaves, often on the underside of the leaf.

Spots develop into oily looking blisters.

Control

Timely application of copper based fungicide.

  1. Sooty mold.

sooty mold in citrus

It’s a fungal disease.

Symptoms

Leaves becomes black

This is as a result of honeydew secretions from insects such as white-flies, aphids and mealy bugs.

Control

Use an effective insecticide and also spray copper based fungicide and where there is severe infestation spray again after 14 days.

  1. Citrus canker

It’s a bacterial infection.

Symptoms

Yellow halo-like lesions or scabs on the fruit, leaves and twigs.

Severe infections can cause leaf loss, blemished fruit, fruit drop and die back.

Spread

It spreads easily and quickly on air currents, insects, and birds and on humans by means of clothing and infected implements.

Control

Use copper based fungicide as a preventative measure. Destroy already infected trees to contain the spread of bacteria.

PEST AND DISEASES CONTROL IN TREE TOMATO (TAMARRILO) FARMING

  1. Root rot

It is caused by the soil-inhabiting fungus from the phytophthora species.

 Symptoms

Dark brownish patches of harden bark on the trunk of the tree.

The infected area is then left as a dark sunken canker.

Control

Remove all leaves and damaged fruit when it falls to the ground.

Prune off all lower branches off the tree so that the tree branches are more than 2 feet from the ground.

Spray the tree with an effective fungicide.

Pests Affecting Oranges

  1. Aphids

aphids on oranges

They sack the sap out of the leaf.

There is yellowing and the twisting of the leaves, which gives the appearance of deformed leaves. As the severity of the aphid infestation increases, leaf drop and twig and branch die back.

Control

For effective control of aphids use an insecticide e.g. prosper and make sure the underside of the leaf is sprayed thoroughly.

  1. Red mites

They are extremely tiny pest and red or purple in color. These mites infest leaves and fruit. Intense infestations during hot, dry weather can cause leaf drop.

Control

Spray an effective insecticide e.g. karate.

  1. Citrus leaf miner

They feed within the leaves creating distinctive silvery tunnels or ‘mines’.           

Damage is usually worst when there is new flushing particularly on young trees below three years old.

Control 

Spray an effective insecticide e.g. karate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Some of the best fruits to grow in Kenya

The world loves fruits. Fruit farming is a great contributor of our economy, contributing to the food basket. Below are few of the fruits that you can grow both for home consumption or for commercial purposes.

Banana Farming in Kenya

In Kenya, bananas are favorite fruits among many families. It is almost impossible to find a home that doesn’t grow bananas. In some parts like Kisii and Nyamira, it’s almost a main dish. Bananas should be grown in rich soil with plenty of water, shade and support, as their trunks tend to bend. There are different types of bananas in Kenya; hybrid and local.  A banana tree takes about 9 months to grow, and bananas meant for commercial purposes are harvested before ripening to reduce damage and loss during transportation.

Apple Farming in Kenya

There are two major types of apples grown in Kenya, the green one and the red ones. Apples grow best in full sunlight away from wind, in wet loamy or sandy soil. From the time it’s grown, an apple tree can take an average 2 – 4 or 2 – 6 years to bear fruit and can live for 100 years or more.

Read: Get Over Ksh 700,000 from an acre of Hybrid onions in Kenya

Mango Farming in Kenya

Mangoes are succulent fruits grown in places with plenty of sun and water. There are different types of mangoes grown in Kenya. One should do research to know which mangoes will grow best in the area they are in. A mango tree can take 3 – 5 years to mature and bear fruit if grafted and upto 8 years if not grafted. Like bananas, mangoes are harvested before they are ripe reduce damage and loss during transportation. Learn more about mango farming here

Orange Farming in Kenya

Oranges are very popular in the Kenyan market. They are found everywhere; in markets, supermarkets, kiosks and the likes. There are different types of oranges, some of them may not be too sweet. Identifying the type of orange tree is not a difficult task though. The sweetest oranges have a deep orange skin. Oranges take about 3 years to grow and produce fruit if grafted, if not, they may take up to 15 years! They, just like pineapples, require high temperatures to produce sweet fruit. Learn more about Orange farming in kenya here

Hass Avocado Farming in Kenya

Hass avocado at Mkulima Wa Nyeri Farm

In kenya, hass avocado farming is picking momentum. Avocados are widely used in Kenyan homes. They are used as baby feed, mashed and mixed in food (some people cannot stand this), or used as dessert in homes and hotels as well. There are quite a number of avocado types grown all over the country. Avocados take about 3 years to grow and bear fruit. They grow best in warm weather. They must be harvested before they ripen in order to reduce wastage during transportation. Learn more about hass avocado farming here

Read: How to achieve success in a given agribusiness venture

Pawpaw Farming in Kenya

Pawapaw farming is very sensitive but pawpaw are always in demand in kenya. Unlike other sweet fruits, pawpaws are extremely sensitive to sunlight which can kill them. They need plenty of shade during their first year of growing. A grafted paw paw tree can start bearing fruit in 2 -3 years, while a non-grafted tree can take up to eight years! This of course depends on the quality of the seeds used. Learn more about pawpaw farming here

 

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ORANGE FRUITS INVESTMENT

The orange tree is an evergreen, flowering tree, with an average height of 9 to 10 m (30 to 33 ft), although some very old specimens can reach 15 m (49 ft). Its oval leaves, alternately arranged, are 4 to 10 cm (1.6 to 3.9 in) long and have crenulate margins.
Some of the varieties grown in Kenya are

  • Sweet oranges (Citrus sinensis)
  • Limes (C. aurantifolia)
  • Grapefruits (C. paradisi)
  • Lemons (C. limon)
  • Mandarins (C. reticulata).

Being a citrus fruit, the orange is acidic: its pH levels are as low as 2.9, and as high as 4.0

REQUIREMENTS
Citrus species can thrive in a wide range of soil and climatic conditions. Citrus is grown from sea level up to an altitude of 2100 m but for optimal growth a temperature range from 2° to 30° C is ideal. Long periods below 0° C are injurious to the trees and at 13° C growth diminishes. However, individual species and varieties decrease in susceptibility to low temperatures in the following sequence: grapefruit, sweet orange, mandarin, lemon/lime and trifoliate orange as most hardy.
Temperature plays an important role in the production of high quality fruit. Typical coloring of fruit takes place if night temperatures are about 14° C coupled with low humidity during ripening time. Exposure to strong winds and temperatures above 38° C may cause fruit drop, scarring and scorching of fruits. In the tropics the high lands provide the best night weather for orange color and flavor.
Depending on the scion/ rootstock combination, citrus trees grow on a wide range of soils varying from sandy soils to those high in clay. Soils that are good for growing are well-drained, medium-textured, deep and fertile. Waterlogged or saline soils are not suitable and a pH range of 5.5 to 6.0 is ideal. In acidic soil, citrus roots do not grow well, and may lead to copper toxicity. On the other hand at pH above 6, fixation of trace elements take place (especially zinc and iron) and trees develop deficiency symptoms. A low pH may be corrected by adding dolomite lime (containing both calcium and magnesium)

 

A citrus orchard needs continuous soil moisture to develop and produce, and water requirement reaches a peak between flowering and ripening. However, many factors such as temperature, soil type, location, plant density and crop age influence the quantity of water required. Well-distributed annual rainfall of not less than 1000 mm is needed for fair crop. In most cases, due to dry spells, irrigation is necessary. Under rain-fed conditions, flowering is seasonal.
There is a positive correlation between the onset of a rainy season and flower break. With irrigation flowering and picking season could be controlled by water application during dry seasons. Irrigation systems involving mini sprinklers irrigating only soil next to citrus trees have been developed as an efficient and water conserving irrigation method.
 

HOW TRANSPLANTING IS DONE

  • Transplant in the field at onset of rains.
  • Clear the field and dig planting holes 60 x 60 x 60 cm well before the onset of rains.
  • At transplanting use well-rotted manure with topsoil.
  • Spacing varies widely, depending on elevation, rootstock and variety. Generally, trees need a wider spacing at sea level than those transplanted at higher altitudes. Usually the plant density varies from 150 to 500 trees per ha, which means distances of 4 x 5 m (limes and lemons), 5 x 6 m (oranges, grapefruits and mandarins) or 7 x 8 m (oranges, grapefruits and mandarins). In some countries citrus is planted in hedge rows.
  • It is very important to ensure that seedlings are not transplanted too deep.
  • After transplanting, the seedlings ought to be at the same height or preferably, somewhat higher than in the nursery.
  • Under no circumstances must the graft union ever be in contact with the soil or with mulching material if used.



CITRUS MANAGEMENT

  • Keep the trees free of weeds.
  • Maintain a single stem up to a height of 80-100 cm.
  • Remove all side branches / rootstock suckers.
  • Pinch or break the top branch at a height of 100 cm to encourage side branching.
  • Allow 3-4 scaffold branches to form the framework of the tree.
  • Remove side branches including those growing inwards.
  • Ensure all diseased and dead branches are removed regularly.
  • Careful use of hand tools is necessary in order to avoid injuring tree trunks and roots. Such injuries may become entry points for diseases.
  • As a general rule, if dry spells last longer than 3 months, irrigation is necessary to maintain high yields and fruit quality. Irrigation could be done with buckets or a hose pipe but installation of some kind of irrigation system would be ideal.

FERTILIZERS

For normal growth development (high yield and quality fruits), citrus trees require a sufficient supply of fertilizer and manuring. No general recommendation regarding the amounts of nutrients can be given because this depends on the fertility of the specific soil. Professional, combined soil and leaf analyses would provide right information on nutrient requirements.

In most cases tropical soils are low in organic matter. To improve them at least 20 kg (1 bucket) of well-rotted cattle manure or compost should be applied per tree per year as well as a handful of rock phosphate. On acid soils 1-2 kg of agricultural lime can be applied per tree spread evenly over the soil covering the root system. Application of manure or compost makes (especially grape-) fruits sweeter (farmer experience).

Nitrogen can be supplied by inter cropping citrus trees with legume crops such as mucuna, cowpeas, clover or dolichos beans, and incorporating the plant material into the soil once a year. Mature trees need much more compost/well rotted manure than young trees to cater for more production of fruit.
Conventional fertilization depend on soil types as well.

DISEASE CONTROL
There are a large number of citrus diseases caused by bacteria, mycoplasma, fungi and viruses. The organic citrus disease management consists in a 3-step system:

  • Use of disease-free planting material to avoid disease problems
  • Choosing root stocks and cultivars that are tolerant or resistant to prevalent diseases
  • Application of fungicides such as copper, sulphur, clay powder and fennel oil. Copper can control several disease problems. However, it must not be forgotten that high Copper accumulations in the soil is toxic for soil microbial life and reduce the cation exchange capacity.

 

source; Goldenscape Tree Africa

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Establishing a tree fruit orchard in Kenya

Establishing an orchard for your tree fruits

Where to plant your fruit trees is an important consideration when starting your orchard. Ideally you want good drainage, good soil, plenty of sunshine (fruiting trees require a minimum of 6-8 hours of sun per day during the growing season), and good air flow. You want your trees to be wind protected and try to avoid low-lying sites. A slope is the best location, if you have one. Fertile soils with a depth of  more than 1.5 meters and pH range of 5.8–6.6 are ideal for growing fruit trees.

Dig large holes before planting fruit trees. The tree holes need to be large enough to accommodate the root system, a 2 feet diameter is a good measurement. Mix well with the existing soil and good quality compost. Mulching and composting are an important part of the orchard.

The proposed orchard’s site has to be cleared as thoroughly as possible of perennial weeds, undergrowth, trees, stumps, roots, trash and debris. This should be followed by levelling of unwanted anthills and the elimination of their destructive inhabitants. To achieve a good tilth of the cleared land, fruit growers are advised to plant an annual crop a year before starting fruit cultivation. After this annual crop has been harvested, the final re-ploughing, harrowing and levelling is carried out.

 

Selection of suitable fruit species/cultivars

The choice of suitable fruit species and cultivars to grow is one of the most important prerequisites for successful fruit farming. A cultivar must be adapted to the environmental conditions of the locality in which it is to be grown, and there should be a good market demand for it. For many fruits there is an extended list from which to choose.

  • Mangoes (Kent, Tommy, Ngowe and apple varieties) @150
    Hass avocados/fuerte @150
    Oranges @150
    Muthakwa grafted tree tomatoes @100
    Apples @400
    Lime @150
    Lemons@100
    Tangerines @150
    Macadamia @400
    Grafted purple passion fruits @70
    Aplicot @300
    Pepino melons @100
    Tissue culture bananas @250
    Guavas @100
    Plums @400
    Peaches @300
    Pomegranates @300
    kiwi @800
    Pawpaw @50
    Grapes @250